Java Servlet / JSP Example

Discussion in 'Java' started by saifnobel@gmail.com, Dec 12, 2007.

  1. Guest

    I have a servlet JSP example compiled and running on my home PC. When
    I open the following link in a web browser on my PC,

    http://localhost:8084/servlets-examples/index.html

    I can view this page. How can I view this same page remotely? That is,
    how do I configure my PC and this servlet example for it to be
    viewable on the Internet from anywhere?

    Cheers,

    Saif
    , Dec 12, 2007
    #1
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  2. Lew Guest

    wrote:
    > I have a servlet JSP example compiled and running on my home PC. When
    > I open the following link in a web browser on my PC,
    >
    > http://localhost:8084/servlets-examples/index.html
    >
    > I can view this page. How can I view this same page remotely? That is,
    > how do I configure my PC and this servlet example for it to be
    > viewable on the Internet from anywhere?


    Assuming that you do not violate your ISP's Terms of Service (TOS), there
    isn't usually anything special. Naturally you cannot refer to it as
    "localhost" from a remote location; your client will have to use the publicly
    accessible address.

    Naturally your firewalls and routers will have to let the request in, but that
    has nothing to do with your app server or servlet.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Dec 12, 2007
    #2
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  3. "Lew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > wrote:
    >> I have a servlet JSP example compiled and running on my home PC. When
    >> I open the following link in a web browser on my PC,
    >>
    >> http://localhost:8084/servlets-examples/index.html
    >>
    >> I can view this page. How can I view this same page remotely? That is,
    >> how do I configure my PC and this servlet example for it to be
    >> viewable on the Internet from anywhere?

    >
    > Assuming that you do not violate your ISP's Terms of Service (TOS), there
    > isn't usually anything special. Naturally you cannot refer to it as
    > "localhost" from a remote location; your client will have to use the
    > publicly accessible address.
    >
    > Naturally your firewalls and routers will have to let the request in, but
    > that has nothing to do with your app server or servlet.


    Check out no-ip.org. They allow you to map your publically accessible IP to
    a domain name. If you have a dynamic IP (which you probably do) this will
    keep DNS updated with the current value. It works this out automatically by
    reflecting off their website. You will still have to configure your
    firewall and routers to forward the connection to your local machine, if you
    have such intermediaries.

    Matt Humphrey http://www.iviz.com/
    Matt Humphrey, Dec 12, 2007
    #3
  4. "Matt Humphrey" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Check out no-ip.org. They allow you to map your publically accessible IP
    > to a domain name.


    For free.

    > If you have a dynamic IP (which you probably do) this will keep DNS
    > updated with the current value. It works this out automatically by
    > reflecting off their website. You will still have to configure your
    > firewall and routers to forward the connection to your local machine, if
    > you have such intermediaries.
    Matt Humphrey, Dec 12, 2007
    #4
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