java software naming question

Discussion in 'Java' started by mcheung63@gmail.com, Jan 7, 2013.

  1. Guest

    Hi
    My name is Peter, Asisn, In internet, western people love to name their software with a "s" ending, suchs as : windows, google docs.
    What is the reason? Is it easier to pronounce with a "s" sound? If my software doesn't end with a "s", will western people think it is hard to say that word?

    thanks
    from Peter
     
    , Jan 7, 2013
    #1
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  2. On Monday, January 7, 2013 4:11:44 AM UTC-5, wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > My name is Peter, Asisn, In internet, western people love to name their software with a "s" ending, suchs as : windows, google docs.
    >
    > What is the reason? Is it easier to pronounce with a "s" sound? If my software doesn't end with a "s", will western people think it is hard to say that word?
    >
    >
    >
    > thanks
    >
    > from Peter


    No we just like making stuff plural (I don't but marketing people seem to like it)
     
    Aryeh M. Friedman, Jan 7, 2013
    #2
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  3. On Monday, January 7, 2013 4:11:44 AM UTC-5, wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > My name is Peter, Asisn, In internet, western people love to name their software with a "s" ending, suchs as : windows, google docs.
    >
    > What is the reason? Is it easier to pronounce with a "s" sound? If my software doesn't end with a "s", will western people think it is hard to say that word?


    Also note that there are plenty of programs that are not pluralized like most java based applications (tomcats ikkkk!!)
     
    Aryeh M. Friedman, Jan 7, 2013
    #3
  4. Muco Guest

    On 2013-01-07 20:11:44 +1100, said:

    > Hi
    > My name is Peter, Asisn, In internet, western people love to name
    > their software with a "s" ending, suchs as : windows, google docs.
    > What is the reason? Is it easier to pronounce with a "s" sound? If
    > my software doesn't end with a "s", will western people think it is
    > hard to say that word?
    >



    Most definitely correct. People in western internet love to name their
    software with 's' ending. Apart from it being easier to pronounce,
    ending a word with 's' helps prevent saliva being ejected from
    speaker's mouth into the face of listener. For example, ending a word
    with 'p' results in much saliva being ejected. Saliva spray can spread
    disease.
     
    Muco, Jan 7, 2013
    #4

  5. > I think the general rule is that if the software named for something
    >
    > user visible for which the user will see multiple instances it is likely
    >
    > to have a plural name.


    Simpler explanation marketing people are clueless ;-)
     
    Aryeh M. Friedman, Jan 7, 2013
    #5
  6. On Mon, 07 Jan 2013 07:03:09 -0800, Patricia Shanahan <>
    wrote:

    >On 1/7/2013 1:11 AM, wrote:
    >> Hi
    >> My name is Peter, Asisn, In internet, western people love to name their software with a "s" ending, suchs as : windows, google docs.
    >> What is the reason? Is it easier to pronounce with a "s" sound? If my software doesn't end with a "s", will western people think it is hard to say that word?


    >An MS Windows system does not just have one window. Google Documents did
    >not just support one document. Google switched to singular for Google
    >Drive, presumably because all of a given user's documents appear to be
    >on one virtual drive.
    >
    >I think the general rule is that if the software named for something
    >user visible for which the user will see multiple instances it is likely
    >to have a plural name.


    True in general.

    Counterexample: Microsoft Word.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko
     
    Gene Wirchenko, Jan 7, 2013
    #6
  7. On 01/07/2013 05:34 PM, Gene Wirchenko wrote:
    > On Mon, 07 Jan 2013 07:03:09 -0800, Patricia Shanahan<>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On 1/7/2013 1:11 AM, wrote:


    >>> My name is Peter, Asisn, In internet, western people love to name their software with a "s" ending, suchs as : windows, google docs.
    >>> What is the reason? Is it easier to pronounce with a "s" sound? If my software doesn't end with a "s", will western people think it is hard to say that word?

    >
    >> An MS Windows system does not just have one window. Google Documents did
    >> not just support one document. Google switched to singular for Google
    >> Drive, presumably because all of a given user's documents appear to be
    >> on one virtual drive.
    >>
    >> I think the general rule is that if the software named for something
    >> user visible for which the user will see multiple instances it is likely
    >> to have a plural name.

    >
    > True in general.
    >
    > Counterexample: Microsoft Word.


    Cool! Is it java software?

    Magnus
     
    Magnus Warker, Jan 7, 2013
    #7
  8. markspace Guest

    On 1/7/2013 9:26 AM, Magnus Warker wrote:

    > On 01/07/2013 05:34 PM, Gene Wirchenko wrote:
    >> Counterexample: Microsoft Word.


    > Cool! Is it java software?



    I prefer to call it Javas. Because the s makes it easier to say. Also
    I use softwares, because there's more than one. Also I say Microsoft
    Words, because it's easier to say and there's more than one words.

    Honestly, I think we're being trolled, but the point is if you don't
    know English, hire a translator.
     
    markspace, Jan 7, 2013
    #8
  9. Lew Guest

    On Monday, January 7, 2013 1:11:44 AM UTC-8, wrote:
    > My name is Peter, Asisn, In internet, western people love to name their software with a "s" ending,
    > suchs as : windows, google docs.
    > What is the reason? Is it easier to pronounce with a "s" sound?


    "Windows" and "Google Docs" are trademarked names, so that's why we pronounce the "s".

    If the product names were "Window" and "Google Doc" we wouldn't.

    If my name were "James", you'd pronounce the "s" at the end. My name is "Lew", so you don't.

    > If my software doesn't end with a "s", will western people think it is hard to say that word?


    Which peoples do you include as "Western"?

    I have no problem pronouncing words that do not end in "s", and I'm from the United States.
    For example, I find "Lew" very easy to pronounce.

    --
    Lew
     
    Lew, Jan 7, 2013
    #9
  10. Lew Guest

    Muco wrote:
    > Most definitely correct. People in western internet love to name their


    Muco here is lying to you. Do not believe him.

    Muco, us here do not think your post was amusing.

    --
    Lew
     
    Lew, Jan 7, 2013
    #10
  11. Eric Sosman Guest

    On 1/7/2013 2:41 PM, Chris Uppal wrote:
    > markspace wrote:
    >
    >> Honestly, I think we're being trolled, but the point is if you don't
    >> know English, hire a translator.

    >
    > I don't. I think it's one of the more interesting off-topic (but there's
    > nothing wrong with that in moderation, and as long as it's interesting)
    > questions I've seen for a while.
    >
    > I wish I had a persuasive hypothesis to offer in return, but -- at least to
    > date -- I haven't been able to think of one.
    >
    > -- chris
    >
    > P.S. remember, programming is /all about/ communication. Names matter.


    That's why we have super-descriptive names like "Java," which
    communicates the ideas "Big island in Indonesia" and "Body of water
    adjoining Borneo" and "Language also known as Javanese."

    --
    Eric Sosman
    d
     
    Eric Sosman, Jan 7, 2013
    #11
  12. Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 1/7/2013 4:11 AM, wrote:
    > My name is Peter, Asisn, In internet, western people love to name
    > their software with a "s" ending, suchs as : windows, google docs.
    > What is the reason? Is it easier to pronounce with a "s" sound? If my
    > software doesn't end with a "s", will western people think it is hard
    > to say that word?


    Some end with a 's' - some don't.

    Given that many use plural in their product naming and that such
    ends with a 's', then the probability of product names ending
    with a 's' is much higher than if it was random.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Jan 7, 2013
    #12
  13. Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 1/7/2013 2:11 PM, Lew wrote:
    > On Monday, January 7, 2013 1:11:44 AM UTC-8, wrote:
    >> If my software doesn't end with a "s", will western people think it is hard to say that word?

    >
    > Which peoples do you include as "Western"?
    >
    > I have no problem pronouncing words that do not end in "s", and I'm from the United States.
    > For example, I find "Lew" very easy to pronounce.


    I don't, but ...

    :)

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Jan 7, 2013
    #13
  14. Lew Guest

    Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > Lew wrote:
    >> I have no problem pronouncing words that do not end in "s", and I'm fromthe United States.
    >> For example, I find "Lew" very easy to pronounce.

    >
    > I don't, but ...
    >
    > :)


    It's pronounced like the British slang word for the water closet: "loo".

    --
    Lew
     
    Lew, Jan 8, 2013
    #14
  15. Roedy Green Guest

    On Mon, 7 Jan 2013 01:11:44 -0800 (PST), wrote,
    quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

    > My name is Peter, Asisn, In internet, western people love to

    name their software with a "s" ending, suchs as : windows, google
    docs.
    > What is the reason? Is it easier to pronounce with a "s" sound?

    If my software doesn't end with a "s", will western people think it is
    hard to say that word?

    S means plural. Windows has many windows.

    It some languages you don't specify the plurality unless it is
    important or unobvious. You might double the word, or use a
    quantifier.

    English is obsessed with plurality/number. You can't say anything
    without being specific. It is similarly obsessed with gender.
    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products http://mindprod.com
    Students who hire or con others to do their homework are as foolish
    as couch potatoes who hire others to go to the gym for them.
     
    Roedy Green, Jan 8, 2013
    #15
  16. Lew Guest

    On Monday, January 7, 2013 6:04:09 PM UTC-8, Roedy Green wrote:
    > English is obsessed with plurality/number. You can't say anything
    > without being specific. It is similarly obsessed with gender.


    Unlike French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and a host of other languages,
    English does not have much in the way of feminine vs. masculine distinctions.

    So how is that "obsessed with gender"?

    Doesn't every language have a way of expressing "more than one"?

    How can a language be "obsessed"?

    --
    Lew
     
    Lew, Jan 8, 2013
    #16
  17. On Mon, 07 Jan 2013 17:13:44 -0500, Eric Sosman
    <> wrote:

    >On 1/7/2013 2:41 PM, Chris Uppal wrote:
    >> markspace wrote:
    >>
    >>> Honestly, I think we're being trolled, but the point is if you don't
    >>> know English, hire a translator.

    >>
    >> I don't. I think it's one of the more interesting off-topic (but there's
    >> nothing wrong with that in moderation, and as long as it's interesting)
    >> questions I've seen for a while.
    >>
    >> I wish I had a persuasive hypothesis to offer in return, but -- at least to
    >> date -- I haven't been able to think of one.
    >>
    >> -- chris
    >>
    >> P.S. remember, programming is /all about/ communication. Names matter.

    >
    > That's why we have super-descriptive names like "Java," which
    >communicates the ideas "Big island in Indonesia" and "Body of water
    >adjoining Borneo" and "Language also known as Javanese."


    ... and coffee.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko
     
    Gene Wirchenko, Jan 8, 2013
    #17
  18. Roedy Green Guest

    On Mon, 07 Jan 2013 17:13:44 -0500, Eric Sosman
    <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted
    someone who said :

    > That's why we have super-descriptive names like "Java," which
    >communicates the ideas "Big island in Indonesia" and "Body of water
    >adjoining Borneo" and "Language also known as Javanese."


    Place to grow great coffee. Programmers like good coffee and work
    long hours by staying alert drinking it. Programmers want a computer
    language they associate with good coffee. Let's call it Java. The
    original logo was a steaming cup of coffee.
    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products http://mindprod.com
    Students who hire or con others to do their homework are as foolish
    as couch potatoes who hire others to go to the gym for them.
     
    Roedy Green, Jan 8, 2013
    #18
  19. Roedy Green Guest

    On Mon, 7 Jan 2013 18:33:47 -0800 (PST), Lew <>
    wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

    >
    >So how is that "obsessed with gender"?


    Consider the sentence.

    He made a pot of Sumatran coffee.

    She made a pot of Sumatran coffee.

    I am constrained by English to specify the flavour of genitals of the
    coffee maker even though it is completely irrelevant to the process of
    making coffee. That I call obsession with gender.

    English has another obsession. I discovered it when I learned
    Esperanto which is even more obsessed. TIME. You can't talk about
    anything happening without specifying past, present, future. You can
    though say that something habitually happens, without specifying when.

    You can in Chinese. If tense is important to be explicit, you add some
    adverb. E.g. I come tomorrow.

    You notice Asian speakers, often say strange things like
    my wife, he sick.
    Frog die.
    Please give 12 egg.

    To them gender, tense, and plurality need not be specified. They are
    implied.

    Esperanto is like English in its concern with precise tense, gender
    and plurality. It has some other obsessions of its own, roughly
    equivalent to direct/indirect object though it has many other uses.

    I suppose Mandarin might become the next interlanguage as English
    fades. Bahasa Indonesia was an early attempt at an interlanguage
    devised by traders moving between thousands of islands. It is easy to
    pronounce, and has a relatively simple grammar.
    I don't know much about Mandarin other than the code I wrote at
    http://mindprod.com/products.html#INWORDS to convert integers into
    words, including Mandarin. It was the simplest of all languages I
    tackled (Icelandic was the hairiest). I gather the difficulties are
    pronunciation and the many many synonyms for the same word.
    (Makes for great fun with puns).


    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products http://mindprod.com
    Students who hire or con others to do their homework are as foolish
    as couch potatoes who hire others to go to the gym for them.
     
    Roedy Green, Jan 8, 2013
    #19
  20. On 1/7/2013 8:33 PM, Lew wrote:
    > On Monday, January 7, 2013 6:04:09 PM UTC-8, Roedy Green wrote:
    >> English is obsessed with plurality/number. You can't say anything
    >> without being specific. It is similarly obsessed with gender.

    >
    > Unlike French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and a host of other languages,
    > English does not have much in the way of feminine vs. masculine distinctions.
    >
    > So how is that "obsessed with gender"?


    I expect he's actually referring to the fact that English possessives
    agree in gender with the possessor instead of the possessed, as would
    happen in, say, French. This can make third-person gender-neutral
    constructs hard to complete: think about how you should complete the
    following sentence: The student did not turn in ____ homework.

    In contrast to Romance languages and many others, English in general
    distinguishes much less between male and female versions of, say, an
    occupation: in French, you'd have to pick between étudiant and
    étudiante. Also note that we have a single third-person plural variant
    ("they", which can also be used as a gender-neutral singular pronoun,
    although some would frown at such a usage [1]), in contrast between
    French where you are forced to pick between "ils" and "elles."

    As for obsessed about number, note that we do not distinguish between
    singular and plural second-person and have not for 400-500 years. "They"
    does a remarkably good job about conveying uncertainty about number as
    well as gender too, and it wouldn't surprise me if it became more
    prevalent in singular third-person in 400 years.

    Note, however, that this kind of inflectional agreement in English is
    largely limited to the various inflections of pronouns; in many Romance
    languages, inflection is required on adjectives and the verbs themselves.

    [1] Singular they has even been used by Shakespeare, so I would
    personally classify attempts to outlaw it on the same level as those who
    hate sentences ending in prepositions: it may be bad style, but
    incorrect English it is not.

    --
    Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct, not
    tried it. -- Donald E. Knuth
     
    Joshua Cranmer, Jan 8, 2013
    #20
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