JAX-WS supports both static and dynamic clients

Discussion in 'Java' started by gk, Sep 25, 2010.

  1. gk

    gk Guest

    what is a static and dynamic client ?

    Here is the relevant context which you may need . I am not comfortable
    with the following text..

    *JAX-WS supports both static and dynamic clients*.

    My Question : when we are talking about web service clients, what
    is a static client and dynamic client ?

    I have a very bad guess though but I'm not sure whether I've
    understood it correctly. I know HTML is a static client but jsp is a
    dynamic client ...but I don't think it is appropriate
    here ....because HTML can't be a web service client though jsp
    possibly could be.

    what is a static client and and dynamic client for JAX-WS ? I need
    an example to understand it.
    gk, Sep 25, 2010
    #1
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  2. gk

    Lew Guest

    On 09/25/2010 08:01 AM, gk wrote:
    > what is a static and dynamic client ?
    >
    > Here is the relevant context which you may need . I am not comfortable
    > with the following text..
    >
    > *JAX-WS supports both static and dynamic clients*.


    Good instinct. I'm not comfortable with it either.

    > My Question : when we are talking about web service clients, what
    > is a static client and dynamic client ?


    I think it's a bad term.

    > I have a very bad guess though but I'm not sure whether I've
    > understood it correctly. I know HTML is a static client but jsp [sic] is a
    > dynamic client ...but I don't think it is appropriate
    > here ....because HTML can't be a web service client though jsp [sic]
    > possibly could be.


    Ummmm ...

    Neither HTML nor JSP is a "client" in any meaningful sense of the word. JSP
    is a markup standard for a system that produces HTML from the JSP source.
    HTML is, as "ML" in the initialism indicates, a markup language for
    presentation. Neither one is a client. The client is the browser that
    interprets the HTML.

    > what is a static client and and dynamic client for JAX-WS ? I need
    > an example to understand it.


    It's a nonsense term, so there won't be any examples.

    Presumably the source of that term (which you do not cite) explains what they
    mean by their idiosyncratic usage. Perhaps they mean "client of systems that
    generate static (dynamic) content"? I don't know - I cannot make sense of the
    term.

    Maybe someone else can, but I vote that you're being led astray by yet another
    bad source.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Sep 25, 2010
    #2
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  3. Lew wrote:
    > On 09/25/2010 08:01 AM, gk wrote:
    >> what is a static and dynamic client ?
    >>
    >> Here is the relevant context which you may need . I am not
    >> comfortable with the following text..
    >>
    >> *JAX-WS supports both static and dynamic clients*.

    >
    > Good instinct. I'm not comfortable with it either.
    >
    >> My Question : when we are talking about web service clients, what
    >> is a static client and dynamic client ?

    >
    > I think it's a bad term.

    [ SNIP ]

    They are real terms - the *static* client approach is the dynamic proxy (go
    figure), where you have an SEI (top-down or bottom-up, starting with
    existing WSDL or not). This is considered to be high-level. The low-level
    *dynamic* client approach is to use the Dispatch API directly and dispense
    with generated artifacts.

    AHS
    --
    Before a man speaks it is always safe to assume that he is a fool.
    After he speaks, it is seldom necessary to assume it. -- H.L. Mencken
    Arved Sandstrom, Sep 25, 2010
    #3
  4. gk

    gk Guest

    On Sep 25, 5:47 pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:
    > Lew wrote:
    > > On 09/25/2010 08:01 AM, gk wrote:
    > >> what is a  static and dynamic client ?

    >
    > >> Here is the relevant context which you may need . I am not
    > >> comfortable with the following  text..

    >
    > >> *JAX-WS supports both static and dynamic clients*.

    >
    > > Good instinct.  I'm not comfortable with it either.

    >
    > >> My Question :   when we are talking about web service clients,  what
    > >> is a static client  and dynamic client ?

    >
    > > I think it's a bad term.

    >
    > [ SNIP ]
    >
    > They are real terms - the *static* client approach is the dynamic proxy (go
    > figure), where you have an SEI (top-down or bottom-up, starting with
    > existing WSDL or not). This is considered to be high-level. The  low-level
    > *dynamic* client approach is to use the Dispatch API directly and dispense
    > with generated artifacts.


    Let me take your comment and further extend it.

    so, I assume this way ...

    Static clients are generated from e.g a WSDL2Java (in Axis) and
    generate a client class to call the service methods.

    Dynamic clients are called by hitting the endoint URL directly using
    Disatch ApI.

    hopefully this is what you wanted to mean.
    gk, Sep 25, 2010
    #4
  5. gk

    Lew Guest

    Lew wrote:
    >> I think it's a bad term.

    > [ SNIP ]


    Arved Sandstrom wrote:
    > They are real terms - the *static* client approach is the dynamic proxy (go
    > figure), where you have an SEI (top-down or bottom-up, starting with
    > existing WSDL or not). This is considered to be high-level. The low-level
    > *dynamic* client approach is to use the Dispatch API directly and dispense
    > with generated artifacts.


    Thanks.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Sep 25, 2010
    #5
  6. gk

    Tom Anderson Guest

    On Sat, 25 Sep 2010, Lew wrote:

    > Lew wrote:
    >>> I think it's a bad term.

    >> [ SNIP ]

    >
    > Arved Sandstrom wrote:
    >> They are real terms - the *static* client approach is the dynamic proxy (go
    >> figure), where you have an SEI (top-down or bottom-up, starting with
    >> existing WSDL or not). This is considered to be high-level. The low-level
    >> *dynamic* client approach is to use the Dispatch API directly and dispense
    >> with generated artifacts.

    >
    > Thanks.


    It's basically like the Dynamic Invocation Interface from CORBA all over
    again. Only done wrong, i'm sure.

    I suppose the analogue in java itself is to normal method calls (static)
    and reflective ones (dynamic). Given:

    String a, b;
    Comparator<String> c;

    You can do:

    int d = c.compare(a, b);

    Or you can do something like (i'm going from memory here):

    Method m = c.getClass().getMethod("compare", String.class, String.class);
    int d = (Integer)m.invoke(c, a, b);

    The point being that you could drive the latter from metadata
    descriptions, without ever having to write code which really knows about
    the Comparable interface.

    Cases where you need dynamic invocation at the programmer level are pretty
    rare. The example that springs to mind is when writing something like
    SoapUI:

    http://www.soapui.org/

    tom

    --
    If this is your first night, you have to fight.
    Tom Anderson, Sep 25, 2010
    #6
  7. gk

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 25-09-2010 12:19, gk wrote:
    > On Sep 25, 5:47 pm, "Arved Sandstrom"<> wrote:
    >> Lew wrote:
    >>> On 09/25/2010 08:01 AM, gk wrote:
    >>>> what is a static and dynamic client ?

    >>
    >>>> Here is the relevant context which you may need . I am not
    >>>> comfortable with the following text..

    >>
    >>>> *JAX-WS supports both static and dynamic clients*.

    >>
    >>> Good instinct. I'm not comfortable with it either.

    >>
    >>>> My Question : when we are talking about web service clients, what
    >>>> is a static client and dynamic client ?

    >>
    >>> I think it's a bad term.

    >>
    >> [ SNIP ]
    >>
    >> They are real terms - the *static* client approach is the dynamic proxy (go
    >> figure), where you have an SEI (top-down or bottom-up, starting with
    >> existing WSDL or not). This is considered to be high-level. The low-level
    >> *dynamic* client approach is to use the Dispatch API directly and dispense
    >> with generated artifacts.

    >
    > Let me take your comment and further extend it.
    >
    > so, I assume this way ...
    >
    > Static clients are generated from e.g a WSDL2Java (in Axis) and
    > generate a client class to call the service methods.
    >
    > Dynamic clients are called by hitting the endoint URL directly using
    > Disatch ApI.
    >
    > hopefully this is what you wanted to mean.


    That is the commonly used terminology.

    I prefer to talk about "generated stub" and "hand coded call",
    because those more clearly explains what they are.

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Sep 28, 2010
    #7
  8. gk

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 25-09-2010 13:55, Tom Anderson wrote:
    > On Sat, 25 Sep 2010, Lew wrote:
    >
    >> Lew wrote:
    >>>> I think it's a bad term.
    >>> [ SNIP ]

    >>
    >> Arved Sandstrom wrote:
    >>> They are real terms - the *static* client approach is the dynamic
    >>> proxy (go
    >>> figure), where you have an SEI (top-down or bottom-up, starting with
    >>> existing WSDL or not). This is considered to be high-level. The
    >>> low-level
    >>> *dynamic* client approach is to use the Dispatch API directly and
    >>> dispense
    >>> with generated artifacts.

    >
    > It's basically like the Dynamic Invocation Interface from CORBA all over
    > again. Only done wrong, i'm sure.


    JAX-WS's predecessor JAX-RPC even used the term DII !

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Sep 28, 2010
    #8
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