Job interview java technical questions

Discussion in 'Java' started by MERIGON Olivier, Feb 15, 2004.

  1. Hello,

    I am going to have an interview in order to get an internship as a Java
    developement enginneer (mainly J2EE, EJB, JMS, JSP/struts developpements). I
    have been told that the software architect will ask me technical questions.
    I was wondering what kind of questions I can expect. Any examples, advises
    or ressources would be welcome.
    Thanks in advance,

    Olivier
     
    MERIGON Olivier, Feb 15, 2004
    #1
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  2. MERIGON Olivier

    Matt Parker Guest

    MERIGON Olivier wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > I am going to have an interview in order to get an internship as a
    > Java
    > developement enginneer (mainly J2EE, EJB, JMS, JSP/struts developpements).
    > I have been told that the software architect will ask me technical
    > questions.
    > I was wondering what kind of questions I can expect. Any examples,
    > advises or ressources would be welcome.
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Olivier


    If you're worried about what questions might be asked, you have to ask
    yourself whether you're suitable for the job...

    In my time I've had interviews where the questions covered an overview of
    the subject, all the way to Gestapo style interview techniques ;-) If you
    know the subject you wont have any problems - I've never yet failed a
    technical interview, but then I've never applied for anything I wasn't
    confident about my experience in.

    Matt

    --
    Not so interesting...
    http://www.mpcontracting.co.uk
     
    Matt Parker, Feb 16, 2004
    #2
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  3. MERIGON Olivier

    Tony Morris Guest

    > (mainly J2EE, EJB, JMS, JSP/struts developpements).

    I suggest you learn more acronyms. In order to be buzzword-compliant, you
    should know at least 10 acronyms related to the Java 2 Programming Language.
    Employers like buzzword-compliant candidates.

    Employers also like candidates with at least 25 years Java experience.

    --
    Tony Morris
    (BInfTech, Cert 3 I.T.)
    Software Engineer
    IBM Australia - Tivoli Security Software
    (2003 VTR1000F)
    Sun Certified Programmer for the Java 2 Platform (1.4)
    Sun Certified Developer for the Java 2 Platform
     
    Tony Morris, Feb 16, 2004
    #3
  4. LOL


    "Tony Morris" <> a écrit dans le message de news:
    c0pbbu$hbq$...
    > > (mainly J2EE, EJB, JMS, JSP/struts developpements).

    >
    > I suggest you learn more acronyms. In order to be buzzword-compliant, you
    > should know at least 10 acronyms related to the Java 2 Programming

    Language.
    > Employers like buzzword-compliant candidates.
    >
    > Employers also like candidates with at least 25 years Java experience.
    >
    > --
    > Tony Morris
    > (BInfTech, Cert 3 I.T.)
    > Software Engineer
    > IBM Australia - Tivoli Security Software
    > (2003 VTR1000F)
    > Sun Certified Programmer for the Java 2 Platform (1.4)
    > Sun Certified Developer for the Java 2 Platform
    >
    >
    >
     
    MERIGON Olivier, Feb 16, 2004
    #4
  5. In article <40301a0f$0$5721$>,
    Matt Parker <> wrote:

    > MERIGON Olivier wrote:
    >
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I am going to have an interview in order to get an internship as a
    > > Java
    > > developement enginneer (mainly J2EE, EJB, JMS, JSP/struts developpements).
    > > I have been told that the software architect will ask me technical
    > > questions.
    > > I was wondering what kind of questions I can expect. Any examples,
    > > advises or ressources would be welcome.
    > > Thanks in advance,
    > >
    > > Olivier

    >
    > If you're worried about what questions might be asked, you have to ask
    > yourself whether you're suitable for the job...


    Not at all - if he is simply trying to figure out the general class of
    questions asked of people seeking intern jobs, more power to him.
    Similarly, if he is asking us whether we give "mensa word problem"
    questions, then, again, more power to him.

    People ask all sorts of tangentially related stuff at interviews, and if
    you have not had one for a while, or if you are a student going for an
    internship, then you might not have any idea what to expect. Just
    knowing whether memorizing Sun white papers is worth doing might help.

    > In my time I've had interviews where the questions covered an overview of
    > the subject, all the way to Gestapo style interview techniques ;-) If you
    > know the subject you wont have any problems - I've never yet failed a
    > technical interview, but then I've never applied for anything I wasn't
    > confident about my experience in.


    Agreed - I, too, have seen interview questions go all over the map.

    I can tell you what I would ask in an interview:

    1. At least one question about the most important technology to the
    project listed on your resume. For example, if someone is coming in for
    a J2EE position, and they claim to know it, I would ask "you have five
    minutes to explain the difference between CMP and BMP, and where you
    would use each. Be terse, but state a clear position." That will
    almost always give me a good idea about whether they know it.

    2. At least one question on a past project listed there, perhaps
    something like "I note that you wrote a programming language. Could you
    take five minutes to describe the key features of the language, why you
    wrote it, and how the project went?"

    3. An ups-and-downs question, like "what were the best and worst parts
    of the project you just described".

    4. "What are you reading these days? Was it worth the read? Who would
    you reccomend it for?" I am after technical books - it really does not
    matter much _which_ books/magazines/articles they are reading, as long
    as there are some and they seem to be getting information out of them.

    From this, I get a pretty fair idea of where the person's skill set is
    at. I also get a good idea of how introspective they are.

    This usually blows 20-30 minutes. I then take the next half hour to
    talk about the project, the role I envison for them, and to try to probe
    how well they fit that. They win if they keep me talking for the next
    half hour on things I would want an intern to know.

    I agree with Matt - if you know your stuff, then you should do well.
    Remember that the interviewer wants to know how well you can do the job
    and how well you fit in, and you want him or her to remember you. Thus,
    say definitive things, and try not to come across as a nebish or weasel.

    Scott
    Java, Cocoa, WebObjects, and Database consulting
     
    Scott Ellsworth, Feb 17, 2004
    #5
  6. MERIGON Olivier

    Matt Parker Guest

    Scott Ellsworth wrote:

    > This usually blows 20-30 minutes. I then take the next half hour to
    > talk about the project, the role I envison for them, and to try to probe
    > how well they fit that. They win if they keep me talking for the next
    > half hour on things I would want an intern to know.
    >


    Also, about that elusive "Have you any questions?" thing at the end. I
    always found it good to ask about how the team gels, and whether they have
    a social life - ie. going to the pub on a Friday lunchtime. It tells the
    interviewer that you are concerned with the environment you will be working
    in as well as the technical stuff (whether you are a *real* team player, or
    whether that stops at 5pm). It also ends the interview on a positive note
    which makes the interviewer feel happier about how the whole interview
    went, even if there were some stumbling blocks.

    Matt

    --
    Not so interesting...
    http://www.mpcontracting.co.uk
     
    Matt Parker, Feb 17, 2004
    #6
  7. In article <4031f918$0$19579$>,
    Matt Parker <> wrote:

    > Scott Ellsworth wrote:
    >
    > > This usually blows 20-30 minutes. I then take the next half hour to
    > > talk about the project, the role I envison for them, and to try to probe
    > > how well they fit that. They win if they keep me talking for the next
    > > half hour on things I would want an intern to know.
    > >

    >
    > Also, about that elusive "Have you any questions?" thing at the end. I
    > always found it good to ask about how the team gels, and whether they have
    > a social life - ie. going to the pub on a Friday lunchtime. It tells the
    > interviewer that you are concerned with the environment you will be working
    > in as well as the technical stuff (whether you are a *real* team player, or
    > whether that stops at 5pm). It also ends the interview on a positive note
    > which makes the interviewer feel happier about how the whole interview
    > went, even if there were some stumbling blocks.


    Indeed - those kind of teaming questions are important, sometimes more
    so than the tech questions before.

    Someone whose job ends at 5 will not always be rejected, but I need to
    know why they have a strong work/home seperation. Are they a
    misanthrope, or are they someone who gets the job done in the allotted
    time by keeping non-work things outside of work? The first can kill a
    team, while the second can bring a lot of focus, and cut down overtime
    to boot.

    Kind of hard to tell than from a ten minute question and answer session,
    but critically important.

    Scott
     
    Scott Ellsworth, Feb 17, 2004
    #7
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