keyboard assignment

Discussion in 'HTML' started by J. Randy Mitchell, Sep 24, 2004.

  1. Forgive my lack of html coding, but I have created a music book to use on
    stage. I have each page categorized alphabetically with a "previous page" -
    "home" and "Next" link on each page. Is there a way to assign a keyboard
    stroke to each of the three links or to each page? For example, if I'm on
    the F page and I need to get to the J page, can I assign the corresponding
    keyboard key to take me to that page rather than grab a mouse and click
    next 4 times and/or click back to index and then click on J. I'm trying to
    be able to save time searching for songs and alleviating too much time
    between songs. I'd like to be able to simply click the keyboard letter of
    the alphabet to take me directly to that page. I'm sure it's a simple
    coding process, but I'm just not sure how to go about it.

    Any help will be appreciated~!

    JRandy
     
    J. Randy Mitchell, Sep 24, 2004
    #1
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  2. J. Randy Mitchell

    Jim Higson Guest

    J. Randy Mitchell wrote:

    > Forgive my lack of html coding, but I have created a music book to use on
    > stage. I have each page categorized alphabetically with a "previous page"
    > - "home" and "Next" link on each page. Is there a way to assign a keyboard
    > stroke to each of the three links or to each page? For example, if I'm on
    > the F page and I need to get to the J page, can I assign the corresponding
    > keyboard key to take me to that page rather than grab a mouse and click
    > next 4 times and/or click back to index and then click on J. I'm trying to
    > be able to save time searching for songs and alleviating too much time
    > between songs. I'd like to be able to simply click the keyboard letter of
    > the alphabet to take me directly to that page. I'm sure it's a simple
    > coding process, but I'm just not sure how to go about it.
    >
    > Any help will be appreciated~!


    <a accesskey="whatever">
     
    Jim Higson, Sep 24, 2004
    #2
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  3. J. Randy Mitchell

    Neal Guest

    On Fri, 24 Sep 2004 11:27:24 -0000, J. Randy Mitchell <>
    wrote:

    > Forgive my lack of html coding, but I have created a music book to use on
    > stage. I have each page categorized alphabetically with a "previous
    > page" -
    > "home" and "Next" link on each page. Is there a way to assign a keyboard
    > stroke to each of the three links or to each page?


    http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/interact/forms.html#adef-accesskey
     
    Neal, Sep 24, 2004
    #3
  4. "J. Randy Mitchell" <> wrote:

    > I have each page categorized alphabetically with a "previous page" -
    > "home" and "Next" link on each page.


    I have always wondered why authors think the "previous" link is
    important. How often do users wish to proceed backwards in a list of
    pages? (As opposite to going back to the page they just visited, which
    can be done using the browser's Back button or equivalent.)

    That issue aside, navigation links are of course essential for any set of
    pages for which there is a natural, or recommended, order of traversal.
    So at least "Next" and "Top" or "Index" (as I would name it - "home" is
    so ambiguous) is needed.

    > Is there a way to assign a
    > keyboard stroke to each of the three links or to each page?


    There are several possible approaches:

    - Use accesskey attributes. However, they are inconsistently implemented
    and, contrary to some misguided advice even by the W3C, they
    actually reduce accessibility by masking out functions that a user
    might be familiar with. For details on this, see
    http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/forms/accesskey.html

    - Use JavaScript to focus on the "Next" link when the page is loaded, so
    that the user can just hit Enter to follow the link. You could put the
    "Index" link right after the "Next" link, so that can be followed by
    hitting tab, then Enter. But there are various drawbacks in this
    approach. Auto-focusing may confuse people, for example.

    - Make the "Next" and "Index" links the first links on the page (with no
    form field before them). The user can then probably follow either of
    those links by hitting tab a suitable small number of times, then
    Enter. Not very convenient - even a mouse might be more comfortable.

    - Use the <link> element, e.g.
    <link rel="next" href="lovesong.html" title="The Love Song">
    <link rel="up" href="index.html" title="Index of songs">
    This may help people using advanced browsers like Mozilla. IE doesn't
    grok this at all, sorry. But on Mozilla, assuming suitable browser
    settings, this creates entries "Up" and "Next" into the browser's
    "Site Navigation Bar", with the title texts shown as tooltips if the
    user moves the pointer over them. Then sit back and wait until
    Mozilla developers enhance this nice feature by making the menu
    keyboard accessible. :)
    (Just kidding. Mozilla users can navigate with the keyboad
    without such constructs, too. But using <link> for the next page
    may speed things up a bit, since it makes Mozilla pre-load the
    next page while the user is reading the current one.)

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Sep 24, 2004
    #4
  5. Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
    > I have always wondered why authors think the "previous" link is
    > important. How often do users wish to proceed backwards in a list of
    > pages? (As opposite to going back to the page they just visited, which
    > can be done using the browser's Back button or equivalent.)


    Someone might want to read previous pages in the list if they found this
    page from a search engine, although I suppose a link to the table of
    contents would serve a similar purpose.
     
    Leif K-Brooks, Sep 25, 2004
    #5
  6. Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
    > <link rel="up" href="index.html" title="Index of songs">
    > This may help people using advanced browsers like Mozilla.


    or Opera, Konqueror, Lynx, Links or W3M.

    I think the "advanced" qualifier can be dropped now :)

    (Although that leaves the question of how to qualify IE which still ignores
    that bit of the HTML 2.0 Specification[1])

    [1] The specification doesn't actually insist that the browser do anything
    with information about next (et al) pages, but IMO that sort of useful data
    isn't the greatest choice of things to pay no attention to.

    --
    David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
    Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
     
    David Dorward, Sep 25, 2004
    #6
  7. J. Randy Mitchell

    Day Brown Guest

    David Dorward wrote:
    > Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
    >
    >> <link rel="up" href="index.html" title="Index of songs">
    >> This may help people using advanced browsers like Mozilla.

    >
    >
    > or Opera, Konqueror, Lynx, Links or W3M.
    >
    > I think the "advanced" qualifier can be dropped now :)
    >
    > (Although that leaves the question of how to qualify IE which still ignores
    > that bit of the HTML 2.0 Specification[1])
    >
    > [1] The specification doesn't actually insist that the browser do anything
    > with information about next (et al) pages, but IMO that sort of useful data
    > isn't the greatest choice of things to pay no attention to.

    There was a time when ANSI graphics were sent out that reconfigured the
    keyboard to do sabotage. Lots of us simply switched to somehing like
    ANSI.COM that didnt include the kybd reassignment keys. It was easier to
    write .bat programs that responded to keys aliasing them as executables.

    But if someone comes up with sabotage reassignment in a browser window,
    I can see the problem mite be more complex to deal with.



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    Day Brown, Sep 26, 2004
    #7
  8. Day Brown wrote:

    <snip my comments about IE supporting <link>>

    > There was a time when ANSI graphics were sent out that reconfigured the
    > keyboard to do sabotage.


    I fail to see what this has to do with Internet Explorer's support for the
    <link> element. It is a good reason to support the accesskey attribute in a
    fashion that does not conflict with existing keyboard shortcuts, but IE
    supports it on <a> elements[1] already.

    [1] In a fashion which allows conflicts with existing shortcuts

    --
    David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
    Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
     
    David Dorward, Sep 26, 2004
    #8
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