Large number of compiled dll's

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Bogdan Nedelcu, Mar 5, 2005.

  1. Hello,

    I have some projects which have lot of aspx files. I notice that for each
    file, the ASP.NET compiles one .DLL in the Temporary ASP.NET folder + 3 or
    for aditional files.

    I think this slows the system down.

    Is there any possibility to put all these files in one DLL - like to
    precompile the whole site ?

    Regards,
    Bogdan
     
    Bogdan Nedelcu, Mar 5, 2005
    #1
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  2. Are you using VS.NET?

    "Bogdan Nedelcu" <bogdan._sterge_nedelcu@team_STERGE_net.ro> wrote in
    message news:eswB$...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have some projects which have lot of aspx files. I notice that for each
    > file, the ASP.NET compiles one .DLL in the Temporary ASP.NET folder + 3 or
    > for aditional files.
    >
    > I think this slows the system down.
    >
    > Is there any possibility to put all these files in one DLL - like to
    > precompile the whole site ?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Bogdan
    >
     
    Tampa.NET Koder, Mar 5, 2005
    #2
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  3. I'm using VS.NET 2003, .NET 1.1
     
    Bogdan Nedelcu, Mar 5, 2005
    #3
  4. Well, hopefully you are using vs.net to compile you website. If this is the
    case, there is no need to worry. Now, if you remove the CodeBehind
    attribute and replace it with the Src attribute, then .net will compile your
    page on the first request to that page.


    "Bogdan Nedelcu" <bogdan._sterge_nedelcu@team_STERGE_net.ro> wrote in
    message news:...
    >
    > I'm using VS.NET 2003, .NET 1.1
    >
    >
    >
     
    Tampa.NET Koder, Mar 5, 2005
    #4
  5. Sorry but I don't think I understand what you mean.

    Can you detail a bit more please.

    From my knowledge, VS.NET doesn't compile the ASPX pages, only the
    Codebehind (.cs) files, so only the ASP.NET framework is responsible for
    compiling at first request. But this is actually the problem, if the page is
    compilled at request time, it will generate a dll for each aspx file.

    "Tampa.NET Koder" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Well, hopefully you are using vs.net to compile you website. If this is
    > the case, there is no need to worry. Now, if you remove the CodeBehind
    > attribute and replace it with the Src attribute, then .net will compile
    > your page on the first request to that page.
    >
    >
    > "Bogdan Nedelcu" <bogdan._sterge_nedelcu@team_STERGE_net.ro> wrote in
    > message news:...
    >>
    >> I'm using VS.NET 2003, .NET 1.1
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Bogdan Nedelcu, Mar 5, 2005
    #5
  6. Well then, you have answered your own question. Yes you are right, at
    runtime the codebehind file and the aspx file gets compile into one file.
    So, if this is the way that the asp.net team designed it, are you looking
    for a way to bypass this model? To be honest, compiled code will never slow
    you down, its a whole lot faster and scripting as previously done with ASP.
    Maybe you should try other things, like turning off default settings like
    Debug="false", EnableSessionState="false", etc. Keeping these settings on if
    you have no use for them does have a performance hit. Otherwise, I would
    wait for someone else to reply to see if they have a solution for you.



    "Bogdan Nedelcu" <bogdan._sterge_nedelcu@team_STERGE_net.ro> wrote in
    message news:%...
    > Sorry but I don't think I understand what you mean.
    >
    > Can you detail a bit more please.
    >
    > From my knowledge, VS.NET doesn't compile the ASPX pages, only the
    > Codebehind (.cs) files, so only the ASP.NET framework is responsible for
    > compiling at first request. But this is actually the problem, if the page
    > is compilled at request time, it will generate a dll for each aspx file.
    >
    > "Tampa.NET Koder" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Well, hopefully you are using vs.net to compile you website. If this is
    >> the case, there is no need to worry. Now, if you remove the CodeBehind
    >> attribute and replace it with the Src attribute, then .net will compile
    >> your page on the first request to that page.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Bogdan Nedelcu" <bogdan._sterge_nedelcu@team_STERGE_net.ro> wrote in
    >> message news:...
    >>>
    >>> I'm using VS.NET 2003, .NET 1.1
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Tampa.NET Koder, Mar 5, 2005
    #6
  7. Bogdan Nedelcu

    Scott Allen Guest

    ASP.NET 1.x does try to compile all pages in a directory into a single
    assembly when the first page from a directory is requested.

    There are some settings that can modify this behavior:

    1) In <compilation> the debug attribute is set to true.

    2) In <compilation> the batchCompile attribute is set to false.

    3) Pages in the directory are using different languages.

    4) Pages in the directory are updated after the initial batch compile.

    Probably reason #1 is why you don't have a batch compile happening.

    --
    Scott
    http://www.OdeToCode.com/blogs/scott/


    On Sat, 5 Mar 2005 19:08:00 +0200, "Bogdan Nedelcu"
    <bogdan._sterge_nedelcu@team_STERGE_net.ro> wrote:

    >Sorry but I don't think I understand what you mean.
    >
    >Can you detail a bit more please.
    >
    >From my knowledge, VS.NET doesn't compile the ASPX pages, only the
    >Codebehind (.cs) files, so only the ASP.NET framework is responsible for
    >compiling at first request. But this is actually the problem, if the page is
    >compilled at request time, it will generate a dll for each aspx file.
    >
    >"Tampa.NET Koder" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Well, hopefully you are using vs.net to compile you website. If this is
    >> the case, there is no need to worry. Now, if you remove the CodeBehind
    >> attribute and replace it with the Src attribute, then .net will compile
    >> your page on the first request to that page.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Bogdan Nedelcu" <bogdan._sterge_nedelcu@team_STERGE_net.ro> wrote in
    >> message news:...
    >>>
    >>> I'm using VS.NET 2003, .NET 1.1
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
     
    Scott Allen, Mar 6, 2005
    #7
  8. Answer accepted ;)

    Thank you very much.

    "Scott Allen" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ASP.NET 1.x does try to compile all pages in a directory into a single
    > assembly when the first page from a directory is requested.
    >
    > There are some settings that can modify this behavior:
    >
    > 1) In <compilation> the debug attribute is set to true.
    >
    > 2) In <compilation> the batchCompile attribute is set to false.
    >
    > 3) Pages in the directory are using different languages.
    >
    > 4) Pages in the directory are updated after the initial batch compile.
    >
    > Probably reason #1 is why you don't have a batch compile happening.
    >
    > --
    > Scott
    > http://www.OdeToCode.com/blogs/scott/
    >
    >
    > On Sat, 5 Mar 2005 19:08:00 +0200, "Bogdan Nedelcu"
    > <bogdan._sterge_nedelcu@team_STERGE_net.ro> wrote:
    >
    >>Sorry but I don't think I understand what you mean.
    >>
    >>Can you detail a bit more please.
    >>
    >>From my knowledge, VS.NET doesn't compile the ASPX pages, only the
    >>Codebehind (.cs) files, so only the ASP.NET framework is responsible for
    >>compiling at first request. But this is actually the problem, if the page
    >>is
    >>compilled at request time, it will generate a dll for each aspx file.
    >>
    >>"Tampa.NET Koder" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> Well, hopefully you are using vs.net to compile you website. If this is
    >>> the case, there is no need to worry. Now, if you remove the CodeBehind
    >>> attribute and replace it with the Src attribute, then .net will compile
    >>> your page on the first request to that page.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Bogdan Nedelcu" <bogdan._sterge_nedelcu@team_STERGE_net.ro> wrote in
    >>> message news:...
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm using VS.NET 2003, .NET 1.1
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
     
    Bogdan Nedelcu, Mar 6, 2005
    #8
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