learn me c

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by anand devarajan, Sep 23, 2006.

  1. hi friends,
    im anand im just a beginner in c learning for the past two
    weeksnow i can write simple prgs can anyone help me to get well known
    to c lang so that i should able to write even tough prgs in c
     
    anand devarajan, Sep 23, 2006
    #1
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  2. anand devarajan

    newbie Guest

    It has taken me 1 year to learn C. I did this by reading a c++ book,
    then reading a generally available c book, then trying to program and
    making so many mistakes it is unbelievable (well actually to the c
    guru's out there - Heathfield and Thompson - this probably is
    believable), and then when I thought I knew c I bought a copy of K & R.
    Only after reading that do I now feal comfortable with c.

    I think unless you are a robot the only way you are gonna learn is by
    reading, making mistakes and learning by them.

    Sorry if this is not much help.

    P.S. If your gonna learn c you must buy a copy of K & R. I think the
    fact that I had already read other programming books before reading it
    definately helped me because they do assume that you are familiar with
    a programming concept.
     
    newbie, Sep 23, 2006
    #2
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  3. anand devarajan

    Guest

    This is all worng.

    newbie wrote:
    > It has taken me 1 year to learn C. I did this by reading a c++ book,
    > then reading a generally available c book, then trying to program and
    > making so many mistakes it is unbelievable (well actually to the c
    > guru's out there - Heathfield and Thompson - this probably is
    > believable), and then when I thought I knew c I bought a copy of K & R.
    > Only after reading that do I now feal comfortable with c.
    >


    Absoultely not. There is no reason to learn C++ before C, it will just
    confuse the hell out of you. Don't do any of this. The best place to
    start isn't even IN a book, its in a simple tutorial. K & R is far to
    hard for a beginner to read, but some other books are okay. There are
    pleanty of other ways to get confortable with C. Just google C
    tutorials. What skill level are you? What do you know now? What do
    you want to learn?

    > I think unless you are a robot the only way you are gonna learn is by
    > reading, making mistakes and learning by them.
    >


    This is also wrong. You can't exactly make mistakes reading and if you
    do you have much bigger problems. In C mistakes are not learned from
    so much as made into habits (if they don't generate errors). My
    biggest tip if you have a warning FIX IT.

    Actually, robots don't learn anything, they just do what they are
    programmed to and pick up information if that is what they're
    instructions told them to. What are you trying to say.

    Any the only way to learn C is to use it! You can't just read and
    learn. Copy the source in the tutorial or book. Not copy and paist,
    manually type it up as a copy, that really helps, then use what you
    learned to make programs.

    All reading and no compiling will make gcc a dull boy.
    (assuming you use gcc which imho you should however this is off topic
    for this group.

    > Sorry if this is not much help.
    >


    Its not, if you want to LEARN C and not just be farmilliar with it.

    > P.S. If your gonna learn c you must buy a copy of K & R. I think the
    > fact that I had already read other programming books before reading it
    > definately helped me because they do assume that you are familiar with
    > a programming concept.


    This is not true at all. In order to learn C you do not have to buy
    any books at all, it helps by is not required. All sorts of info is
    free in the maigcal world were EVERYTHING is, called the internet.
    Hope this helps erase what he just told you.
    Nori

    P.S. You did not learn C in a year, it is not possible to learn the
    whole language, and it is less possible to do it in a year. I have
    been LEARNING C for the past 4 years and I still have barely touched
    the tip of the iceberg. A good understanding, a great understanding
    even, is very differnt than KNOWING the whole thing.
    N
     
    , Sep 23, 2006
    #3
  4. anand devarajan

    newbie Guest

    wrote:
    > This is all worng.


    I think you mean "wrong"! And I think you forget this is my opinion
    and situation. If this was not the case for you then don't worry I
    have not implied that this is the opinion of all c programmers. But I
    am sure you will rip my words apart and tell me that I did.

    >
    > newbie wrote:
    > > It has taken me 1 year to learn C. I did this by reading a c++ book,
    > > then reading a generally available c book, then trying to program and
    > > making so many mistakes it is unbelievable (well actually to the c
    > > guru's out there - Heathfield and Thompson - this probably is
    > > believable), and then when I thought I knew c I bought a copy of K & R.
    > > Only after reading that do I now feal comfortable with c.
    > >

    >
    > Absoultely not. There is no reason to learn C++ before C, it will just
    > confuse the hell out of you. Don't do any of this. The best place to
    > start isn't even IN a book, its in a simple tutorial. K & R is far to
    > hard for a beginner to read, but some other books are okay. There are
    > pleanty of other ways to get confortable with C. Just google C
    > tutorials. What skill level are you? What do you know now? What do
    > you want to learn?
    >


    Oh dear you seem to have taken most of my comments literally, for
    example the robot comment below, but, and quite the opposit, you seem
    to have decided that I implied that he should learn c++ first! I
    merely said that I read a c++ book before learning c.

    > > I think unless you are a robot the only way you are gonna learn is by
    > > reading, making mistakes and learning by them.
    > >

    >
    > This is also wrong. You can't exactly make mistakes reading and if you
    > do you have much bigger problems. In C mistakes are not learned from
    > so much as made into habits (if they don't generate errors). My
    > biggest tip if you have a warning FIX IT.
    >


    Do you not think that by usimg the internet etc, that you are going to
    be "reading"! Also I did say by making mistakes. How can you make
    mistakes if you don't actually compile and run any programs. I would
    have thought this would be implied. Sorry if this is not!

    > Actually, robots don't learn anything, they just do what they are
    > programmed to and pick up information if that is what they're
    > instructions told them to. What are you trying to say.
    >


    Who said anything different?

    > Any the only way to learn C is to use it! You can't just read and
    > learn. Copy the source in the tutorial or book. Not copy and paist,
    > manually type it up as a copy, that really helps, then use what you
    > learned to make programs.
    >
    > All reading and no compiling will make gcc a dull boy.
    > (assuming you use gcc which imho you should however this is off topic
    > for this group.
    >


    Why can't you learn something by just reading? I am not impying that I
    used this method - although you seem to have taken this quite
    literally!

    > > Sorry if this is not much help.
    > >

    >
    > Its not, if you want to LEARN C and not just be farmilliar with it.
    >


    Maybe for you. But of course you should remember this is an opinion
    and not a fact so there's no need for you to get all defensive and
    corrective. But I am sure you will do it again.

    > > P.S. If your gonna learn c you must buy a copy of K & R. I think the
    > > fact that I had already read other programming books before reading it
    > > definately helped me because they do assume that you are familiar with
    > > a programming concept.

    >
    > This is not true at all. In order to learn C you do not have to buy
    > any books at all, it helps by is not required. All sorts of info is
    > free in the maigcal world were EVERYTHING is, called the internet.
    > Hope this helps erase what he just told you.
    > Nori
    >


    I don't understand, can no-one apart from yourself have an opinion on
    something?

    > P.S. You did not learn C in a year, it is not possible to learn the
    > whole language, and it is less possible to do it in a year. I have
    > been LEARNING C for the past 4 years and I still have barely touched
    > the tip of the iceberg. A good understanding, a great understanding
    > even, is very differnt than KNOWING the whole thing.
    > N


    Hey, if that's your level of c after that period of time then good for
    you. People learn at different rates. If I were a rocket scientist
    would you still expect me not to learn c in a short period?
     
    newbie, Sep 23, 2006
    #4
  5. anand devarajan

    Guest

    People learn at differnt rates, and I was meerly stating my opion, I
    didn't mean for it to appear the way that it did reading it over.
    Sorry.
    Nori

    P.S.
    People learn at differnt rates, I was trying to modest. If you want to
    know
    I have made a:
    -Linux web browser
    -Linux text editor
    -Windows text editor
    -Cross platform shell
    -A text based adventure game
    -A IDE for my (that works on linux and windows)
    -Scripting language

    All in C. I'm not saying I learn slow, I am saying that there is
    always more to learn. I guess you never heard of hacker ethics, thats
    okay.

    Also, It just shows how great a person you are for trashing someone
    else. I was meerly saying that I disagreed with your ideas, I should
    have put inho at the top of the post, but I didn't again sorry.
    I however didn't insult you in any shape mannor or form where as you
    insulted me:

    > But I am sure you will rip my words apart and tell me that I did.
    > But I am sure you will do it again.


    And btw you stated nowere in your post that this was your opinion.
    Also, the robot thing was a joke, oh well.
    N

    newbie wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > This is all worng.

    >
    > I think you mean "wrong"! And I think you forget this is my opinion
    > and situation. If this was not the case for you then don't worry I
    > have not implied that this is the opinion of all c programmers. But I
    > am sure you will rip my words apart and tell me that I did.
    >
    > >
    > > newbie wrote:
    > > > It has taken me 1 year to learn C. I did this by reading a c++ book,
    > > > then reading a generally available c book, then trying to program and
    > > > making so many mistakes it is unbelievable (well actually to the c
    > > > guru's out there - Heathfield and Thompson - this probably is
    > > > believable), and then when I thought I knew c I bought a copy of K & R.
    > > > Only after reading that do I now feal comfortable with c.
    > > >

    > >
    > > Absoultely not. There is no reason to learn C++ before C, it will just
    > > confuse the hell out of you. Don't do any of this. The best place to
    > > start isn't even IN a book, its in a simple tutorial. K & R is far to
    > > hard for a beginner to read, but some other books are okay. There are
    > > pleanty of other ways to get confortable with C. Just google C
    > > tutorials. What skill level are you? What do you know now? What do
    > > you want to learn?
    > >

    >
    > Oh dear you seem to have taken most of my comments literally, for
    > example the robot comment below, but, and quite the opposit, you seem
    > to have decided that I implied that he should learn c++ first! I
    > merely said that I read a c++ book before learning c.
    >
    > > > I think unless you are a robot the only way you are gonna learn is by
    > > > reading, making mistakes and learning by them.
    > > >

    > >
    > > This is also wrong. You can't exactly make mistakes reading and if you
    > > do you have much bigger problems. In C mistakes are not learned from
    > > so much as made into habits (if they don't generate errors). My
    > > biggest tip if you have a warning FIX IT.
    > >

    >
    > Do you not think that by usimg the internet etc, that you are going to
    > be "reading"! Also I did say by making mistakes. How can you make
    > mistakes if you don't actually compile and run any programs. I would
    > have thought this would be implied. Sorry if this is not!
    >
    > > Actually, robots don't learn anything, they just do what they are
    > > programmed to and pick up information if that is what they're
    > > instructions told them to. What are you trying to say.
    > >

    >
    > Who said anything different?
    >
    > > Any the only way to learn C is to use it! You can't just read and
    > > learn. Copy the source in the tutorial or book. Not copy and paist,
    > > manually type it up as a copy, that really helps, then use what you
    > > learned to make programs.
    > >
    > > All reading and no compiling will make gcc a dull boy.
    > > (assuming you use gcc which imho you should however this is off topic
    > > for this group.
    > >

    >
    > Why can't you learn something by just reading? I am not impying that I
    > used this method - although you seem to have taken this quite
    > literally!
    >
    > > > Sorry if this is not much help.
    > > >

    > >
    > > Its not, if you want to LEARN C and not just be farmilliar with it.
    > >

    >
    > Maybe for you. But of course you should remember this is an opinion
    > and not a fact so there's no need for you to get all defensive and
    > corrective. But I am sure you will do it again.
    >
    > > > P.S. If your gonna learn c you must buy a copy of K & R. I think the
    > > > fact that I had already read other programming books before reading it
    > > > definately helped me because they do assume that you are familiar with
    > > > a programming concept.

    > >
    > > This is not true at all. In order to learn C you do not have to buy
    > > any books at all, it helps by is not required. All sorts of info is
    > > free in the maigcal world were EVERYTHING is, called the internet.
    > > Hope this helps erase what he just told you.
    > > Nori
    > >

    >
    > I don't understand, can no-one apart from yourself have an opinion on
    > something?
    >
    > > P.S. You did not learn C in a year, it is not possible to learn the
    > > whole language, and it is less possible to do it in a year. I have
    > > been LEARNING C for the past 4 years and I still have barely touched
    > > the tip of the iceberg. A good understanding, a great understanding
    > > even, is very differnt than KNOWING the whole thing.
    > > N

    >
    > Hey, if that's your level of c after that period of time then good for
    > you. People learn at different rates. If I were a rocket scientist
    > would you still expect me not to learn c in a short period?
     
    , Sep 24, 2006
    #5
  6. "" <> writes:

    > This is all worng.
    >


    No it isn't.

    > newbie wrote:
    >> It has taken me 1 year to learn C. I did this by reading a c++ book,
    >> then reading a generally available c book, then trying to program and
    >> making so many mistakes it is unbelievable (well actually to the c
    >> guru's out there - Heathfield and Thompson - this probably is
    >> believable), and then when I thought I knew c I bought a copy of K & R.
    >> Only after reading that do I now feal comfortable with c.
    >>

    >
    > Absoultely not. There is no reason to learn C++ before C, it will just
    > confuse the hell out of you. Don't do any of this. The best place to
    > start isn't even IN a book, its in a simple tutorial. K & R is far to
    > hard for a beginner to read, but some other books are okay. There are
    > pleanty of other ways to get confortable with C. Just google C
    > tutorials. What skill level are you? What do you know now? What do
    > you want to learn?
    >


    K&R is perfectly fine for a beginner to read, although most people will
    want to read it slowly. It certainly isn't difficult; it's just very
    dense, if anything.

    >> I think unless you are a robot the only way you are gonna learn is by
    >> reading, making mistakes and learning by them.
    >>

    >
    > This is also wrong. You can't exactly make mistakes reading and if you
    > do you have much bigger problems. In C mistakes are not learned from
    > so much as made into habits (if they don't generate errors). My
    > biggest tip if you have a warning FIX IT.
    >


    Okay. You said that he was wrong, and continued to "correct" him
    with his own idea in different words.

    <snipped similar>

    >> Sorry if this is not much help.
    >>

    >
    > Its not, if you want to LEARN C and not just be farmilliar with it.
    >


    Right. I often become familiar with stuff without learning it. In
    fact, I use it so often that I've no idea how to even use it! Wait...

    >> P.S. If your gonna learn c you must buy a copy of K & R. I think the
    >> fact that I had already read other programming books before reading it
    >> definately helped me because they do assume that you are familiar with
    >> a programming concept.

    >
    > This is not true at all. In order to learn C you do not have to buy
    > any books at all, it helps by is not required. All sorts of info is
    > free in the maigcal world were EVERYTHING is, called the internet.
    > Hope this helps erase what he just told you.
    > Nori
    >


    Actually, K&R will give you a lot of correct information for a very
    low cost. The Internet will give you a whole lot of crap, and it's
    impossible for you to sift through it unless you already know the
    language.

    > P.S. You did not learn C in a year, it is not possible to learn the
    > whole language, and it is less possible to do it in a year. I have
    > been LEARNING C for the past 4 years and I still have barely touched
    > the tip of the iceberg. A good understanding, a great understanding
    > even, is very differnt than KNOWING the whole thing.
    > N
    >


    It's not possible to learn the whole language in a year? There's under
    100 keywords and operators, so even at the slow rate of one per day,
    you can still learn it in a month or three.

    --
    Andrew Poelstra <http://www.wpsoftware.net/projects>
    To reach me by email, use `apoelstra' at the above domain.
    "Do BOTH ends of the cable need to be plugged in?" -Anon.
     
    Andrew Poelstra, Sep 24, 2006
    #6
  7. anand devarajan

    jmcgill Guest

    wrote:

    > P.S. You did not learn C in a year, it is not possible to learn the
    > whole language, and it is less possible to do it in a year.


    Students in a local university program get about two weeks to learn
    enough C to write for example, a program that shuffles a deck of cards,
    deals poker hands, and evaluates the hands according to the rules of a
    card game.

    Two weeks later, they are doing substantial amounts of text processing
    with pointer arithmetic, and two weeks after that they are doing dynamic
    memory, structs, are starting to get a *very* good grasp of the standard
    C library, can deal with the most complex C syntax, and they also know
    enough of make and the linker to get by, at least in a GCC-based
    environment.

    That's six weeks, give or take. The C language is not complex enough to
    spend "a year" learning it. Learning how to *apply* the language, that
    is of course something you will do for the rest of your career.

    I also disagree with the claim that K&R2 is not appropriate for a
    beginner. It is a very friendly book, if a bit terse, and it does start
    from the beginning concepts. What's the problem?

    I agree with your basic premise that hands-on experience is the best
    approach.

    I don't understand what is taking you 4 years to learn. I can't imagine
    that there is anything in the syntax or the standard library that you
    don't know.
     
    jmcgill, Sep 24, 2006
    #7
  8. anand devarajan

    jmcgill Guest

    Andrew Poelstra wrote:

    > It's not possible to learn the whole language in a year? There's under
    > 100 keywords and operators, so even at the slow rate of one per day,
    > you can still learn it in a month or three.


    It took me a few days to get an overview of the standard library. The
    reason was I had jury duty which had a lot of waiting, and one of the
    books I took with me was a P.J. Plauger C library reference. I read it
    cover to cover!

    Anyway the point is, there's very little *to* learn about the C language
    itself. There are a handful of concepts that may take a certain type of
    thought process to really grasp (pointer arithmetic, standards being
    distinct from the implementation, and complexities that arise from the
    simple grammar), but then there's the library, which also is not huge,
    but must be learned as well as the language. Then of course, the
    learner is faced with libraries that are specific to a target system, or
    specific to some domain of applications. He might need to learn how to
    program with unix sockets, or to do graphics on some graphical system,
    or he might need to learn curses or other I/O libraries of that nature.
    That can take years and years.

    But I don't see how it takes more than a few days to actually "Learn the
    C language." It's not that complex a grammar.
     
    jmcgill, Sep 24, 2006
    #8
  9. anand devarajan

    CBFalconer Guest

    "" wrote:
    >
    > People learn at differnt rates, and I was meerly stating my opion, I
    > didn't mean for it to appear the way that it did reading it over.


    Please refrain from top-posting. Your comments should appear after
    (or intermixed with) the relevant quoted material, i.e. after
    snipping irrelevant quotes. See the following links in my sig.

    --
    Some informative links:
    <news:news.announce.newusers
    <http://www.geocities.com/nnqweb/>
    <http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html>
    <http://www.caliburn.nl/topposting.html>
    <http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote.html>
    <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
     
    CBFalconer, Sep 24, 2006
    #9
  10. said:

    <snip>

    > The best place to
    > start isn't even IN a book, its in a simple tutorial.


    Wrong.

    > K & R is far to hard for a beginner to read,


    Wrong.

    > Just google C tutorials.


    And wrong.

    There are so many terrible C tutorials out there. How is a beginner to know
    which are good and which bad?


    <more junk snipped>

    >> P.S. If your gonna learn c you must buy a copy of K & R. I think the
    >> fact that I had already read other programming books before reading it
    >> definately helped me because they do assume that you are familiar with
    >> a programming concept.

    >
    > This is not true at all.


    Yes, it is true. I think newbie knows a lot more about this than you do.


    --
    Richard Heathfield
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
    http://www.cpax.org.uk
    email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
     
    Richard Heathfield, Sep 24, 2006
    #10
  11. anand devarajan

    Malcolm Guest

    "jmcgill" <> wrote in message
    > Andrew Poelstra wrote:
    >
    >> It's not possible to learn the whole language in a year? There's under
    >> 100 keywords and operators, so even at the slow rate of one per day,
    >> you can still learn it in a month or three.

    >
    > It took me a few days to get an overview of the standard library. The
    > reason was I had jury duty which had a lot of waiting, and one of the
    > books I took with me was a P.J. Plauger C library reference. I read it
    > cover to cover!
    >
    > Anyway the point is, there's very little *to* learn about the C language
    > itself. There are a handful of concepts that may take a certain type of
    > thought process to really grasp (pointer arithmetic, standards being
    > distinct from the implementation, and complexities that arise from the
    > simple grammar), but then there's the library, which also is not huge,
    > but must be learned as well as the language. Then of course, the
    > learner is faced with libraries that are specific to a target system, or
    > specific to some domain of applications. He might need to learn how to
    > program with unix sockets, or to do graphics on some graphical system,
    > or he might need to learn curses or other I/O libraries of that nature.
    > That can take years and years.
    >
    > But I don't see how it takes more than a few days to actually "Learn the
    > C language." It's not that complex a grammar.
    >

    A bought a book on C++ in Leeds, and took the bus to Bradford. I read it,
    and by the time the bus had arrived, I knew C++.
    That is to say, I knew all the keywords and what they meant, I knew how to
    declare clas hierarchies, I knew the quirks like overloaded operators.

    However fifteen years or whatever later, I am still learning how to use C++
    effectively. Or to be more accurate, I've given up. I took the decision a
    couple of years ago not to write any new code in C++ as long as I have the
    final say in the matter.
    --
    www.personal.leeds.ac.uk/~bgy1mm
    freeware games to download.
     
    Malcolm, Sep 24, 2006
    #11
  12. Malcolm wrote:

    > "jmcgill" <> wrote in message


    > > But I don't see how it takes more than a few days to actually "Learn the
    > > C language." It's not that complex a grammar.
    > >

    > A bought a book on C++ in Leeds, and took the bus to Bradford. I read it,
    > and by the time the bus had arrived, I knew C++.
    > That is to say, I knew all the keywords and what they meant, I knew how to
    > declare clas hierarchies, I knew the quirks like overloaded operators.


    How long does the bus from Leeds to Bradford take ,
    about an hour ? Books on C++ tend to be hundreds
    of pages long ; if you managed to read hundereds of
    pages within 1 hour then you're a very talented person.
    Did you also read and understand all the code examples
    the book had ? Even without that it is still an amazing feat.
    Did you remember a few days afterwards the meaning of
    all the keywords ? If yes your memory is impressive.

    I suspect different people mean different things by "learn"
    in this thread. But I don't know how to make it more concrete.
    Personally I can't imagine in my wildest dreams learning C in
    a few days.
     
    Spiros Bousbouras, Sep 24, 2006
    #12
  13. hi friend,
    thanks for ur idea now i need someone to give me some question
    i.e to give me a question for prog to do for eg:to find prime no. it
    might be simple ones for u peoples who were in high level in 'c' but i
    need this type of coaching for me will any one help me so that i can
    develop my programming knowledge
    newbie wrote:
    > It has taken me 1 year to learn C. I did this by reading a c++ book,
    > then reading a generally available c book, then trying to program and
    > making so many mistakes it is unbelievable (well actually to the c
    > guru's out there - Heathfield and Thompson - this probably is
    > believable), and then when I thought I knew c I bought a copy of K & R.
    > Only after reading that do I now feal comfortable with c.
    >
    > I think unless you are a robot the only way you are gonna learn is by
    > reading, making mistakes and learning by them.
    >
    > Sorry if this is not much help.
    >
    > P.S. If your gonna learn c you must buy a copy of K & R. I think the
    > fact that I had already read other programming books before reading it
    > definately helped me because they do assume that you are familiar with
    > a programming concept.
     
    anand devarajan, Sep 24, 2006
    #13
  14. anand devarajan

    jmcgill Guest

    anand devarajan wrote:
    > hi friend,
    > thanks for ur idea now i need someone to give me some question
    > i.e to give me a question for prog to do


    Here's a vague idea for a project that will take you through a lot of
    useful concepts:


    1. Model a deck of playing cards.

    2. Shuffle the cards.

    3. Deal poker hands from the deck.

    4. Evaluate the relative values of the hands dealt.

    5. Implement betting, and draw-poker with turns.
     
    jmcgill, Sep 24, 2006
    #14
  15. sorry i dont know anything about cards so u give me someother project
    work(note that the question u frame is to a beginner in c)
    jmcgill wrote:
    > anand devarajan wrote:
    > > hi friend,
    > > thanks for ur idea now i need someone to give me some question
    > > i.e to give me a question for prog to do

    >
    > Here's a vague idea for a project that will take you through a lot of
    > useful concepts:
    >
    >
    > 1. Model a deck of playing cards.
    >
    > 2. Shuffle the cards.
    >
    > 3. Deal poker hands from the deck.
    >
    > 4. Evaluate the relative values of the hands dealt.
    >
    > 5. Implement betting, and draw-poker with turns.
     
    anand devarajan, Sep 24, 2006
    #15
  16. sorry i dont know anything about cards so u give me someother project
    work(note that the question u frame is to a beginner in c)
    jmcgill wrote:
    > anand devarajan wrote:
    > > hi friend,
    > > thanks for ur idea now i need someone to give me some question
    > > i.e to give me a question for prog to do

    >
    > Here's a vague idea for a project that will take you through a lot of
    > useful concepts:
    >
    >
    > 1. Model a deck of playing cards.
    >
    > 2. Shuffle the cards.
    >
    > 3. Deal poker hands from the deck.
    >
    > 4. Evaluate the relative values of the hands dealt.
    >
    > 5. Implement betting, and draw-poker with turns.
     
    anand devarajan, Sep 24, 2006
    #16
  17. anand devarajan

    jmcgill Guest

    anand devarajan wrote:
    > sorry i dont know anything about cards so u give me someother project
    > work(note that the question u frame is to a beginner in c)


    What I described is essentially the first significant programming
    project in a local university course that includes the introduction
    to C.

    For the first iteration of the project, to be fair, the deck of cards
    and the functions to shuffle and deal them are provided -- but in later
    iterations the students are expected to implement them.


    Here's a simpler idea for you:

    Write a C program that will read standard input and output the number of
    characters, the number of words, and the number of lines in the input.

    Extend this to allow a filename argument as well as standard input.

    Next, write a C program that will echo its command-line arguments to
    standard output.

    Extend this to allow the arguments "-c" "-w", or "-l".

    Extend the program in the first part to enable the user to select
    whether to count characters, words, or lines.
     
    jmcgill, Sep 24, 2006
    #17
  18. jmcgill <> writes:
    [...]
    > Here's a simpler idea for you:
    >
    > Write a C program that will read standard input and output the number of
    > characters, the number of words, and the number of lines in the input.


    Note that this requires defining exactly what a "word" is. Consider
    constructing a rigorous definition to be part of the exercise. Think
    about punctuation, digits, whitespace, etc.

    > Extend this to allow a filename argument as well as standard input.
    >
    > Next, write a C program that will echo its command-line arguments to
    > standard output.
    >
    > Extend this to allow the arguments "-c" "-w", or "-l".


    I presume that refers to the word count program, not the echo program.

    > Extend the program in the first part to enable the user to select
    > whether to count characters, words, or lines.


    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
     
    Keith Thompson, Sep 25, 2006
    #18
  19. anand devarajan

    jmcgill Guest

    Keith Thompson wrote:
    > jmcgill <> writes:
    > [...]
    >> Here's a simpler idea for you:
    >>
    >> Write a C program that will read standard input and output the number of
    >> characters, the number of words, and the number of lines in the input.

    >
    > Note that this requires defining exactly what a "word" is. Consider
    > constructing a rigorous definition to be part of the exercise. Think
    > about punctuation, digits, whitespace, etc.


    I'm being intentionally lazy in describing the problem because I have
    very little confidence that the person asking for ideas intends to
    follow through on them.

    >> Extend this to allow a filename argument as well as standard input.
    >>
    >> Next, write a C program that will echo its command-line arguments to
    >> standard output.
    >>
    >> Extend this to allow the arguments "-c" "-w", or "-l".

    >
    > I presume that refers to the word count program, not the echo program.


    Well, the way I'd assign it, it would end up being each.

    First echo arbitrary parameters, then interpret those parameters, then
    merge the other effort with this one, and you're on your way to
    implementing "wc",

    I wish I could have thought of a more interesting assignment, but card
    games seemed to have met with a cultural barrier of some sort, and I
    pretty much lost interest.
     
    jmcgill, Sep 25, 2006
    #19
  20. anand devarajan

    Default User Guest

    anand devarajan wrote:

    > sorry i dont know anything about cards so u give me someother project
    > work(note that the question u frame is to a beginner in c)


    How about one that delivers electric shocks to top-posters?

    Of course, that would require platform-specific elements.



    Brian
     
    Default User, Sep 25, 2006
    #20
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