Learning Perl

Discussion in 'Perl Misc' started by yamuna, Sep 25, 2005.

  1. yamuna

    yamuna Guest

    I have windows XP at home, i.e no Unix or Linux. I have no access to
    Unix/Linux.

    In order to run Perl codes , what should I install?
     
    yamuna, Sep 25, 2005
    #1
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  2. yamuna

    Mike Guest

    On 2005-09-24, yamuna <> wrote:
    > I have windows XP at home, i.e no Unix or Linux. I have no access to
    > Unix/Linux.
    >
    > In order to run Perl codes , what should I install?
    >


    install cygwin (www.cygwin.com)
     
    Mike, Sep 25, 2005
    #2
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  3. "yamuna" <> wrote in news:1127604882.637891.55670
    @g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

    > I have windows XP at home, i.e no Unix or Linux. I have no access to
    > Unix/Linux.
    >
    > In order to run Perl codes , what should I install?


    There are many Perl distributions for Windows. I am sure you are able to
    search Google:

    http://www.google.com/search?q=perl windows

    Sinan

    --
    A. Sinan Unur <>
    (reverse each component and remove .invalid for email address)

    comp.lang.perl.misc guidelines on the WWW:
    http://mail.augustmail.com/~tadmc/clpmisc/clpmisc_guidelines.html
     
    A. Sinan Unur, Sep 25, 2005
    #3
  4. yamuna

    yamuna Guest

    Mike wrote:
    > On 2005-09-24, yamuna <> wrote:
    > > I have windows XP at home, i.e no Unix or Linux. I have no access to
    > > Unix/Linux.
    > >
    > > In order to run Perl codes , what should I install?
    > >

    >
    > install cygwin (www.cygwin.com)


    It's safe, right. Windows pop-up said "This files does not have a valid
    digital signature that verifies it spublisher..."
     
    yamuna, Sep 25, 2005
    #4
  5. yamuna

    Scott Bryce Guest

    Scott Bryce, Sep 25, 2005
    #5
  6. Also sprach yamuna:

    > Mike wrote:
    >> On 2005-09-24, yamuna <> wrote:
    >> > I have windows XP at home, i.e no Unix or Linux. I have no access to
    >> > Unix/Linux.
    >> >
    >> > In order to run Perl codes , what should I install?
    >> >

    >>
    >> install cygwin (www.cygwin.com)

    >
    > It's safe, right. Windows pop-up said "This files does not have a valid
    > digital signature that verifies it spublisher..."


    It is safe, yes. However, if you want to learn Perl and you're possibly
    more familiar with the Windows environment (which is what your posting
    suggests) I wouldn't use cygwin for it. cygwin is a UNIX environment
    ported to Windows and it's easier to learn one thing than to learn two
    things simultaneously.

    I'd therefore go for ActivePerl or IndigoPerl as it has been suggested
    elsewhere in this thread. After that you could consider using perl under
    cygwin or even install a real Linux. Perl is a lot more fun and also
    easier if you have access to a C compiler and a make-tool.

    Tassilo
    --
    use bigint;
    $n=71423350343770280161397026330337371139054411854220053437565440;
    $m=-8,;;$_=$n&(0xff)<<$m,,$_>>=$m,,print+chr,,while(($m+=8)<=200);
     
    Tassilo v. Parseval, Sep 25, 2005
    #6
  7. yamuna wrote:
    > I have windows XP at home, i.e no Unix or Linux. I have no access to
    > Unix/Linux.
    >
    > In order to run Perl codes , what should I install?


    _THE_ standard Perl distribution for Windows is ActivePerl fromn
    ActiveState, see http://activestate.com/
    It is free, too.

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Sep 25, 2005
    #7
  8. yamuna

    Brian Wakem Guest

    Brian Wakem, Sep 25, 2005
    #8
  9. yamuna

    yamuna Guest

    Brian Wakem wrote:
    > yamuna wrote:
    >
    > > I have windows XP at home, i.e no Unix or Linux. I have no access to
    > > Unix/Linux.

    >
    >
    > Yes you do, it is freely downloadable.


    Yes, yes, yes. I am trying to reach to that stage of having a PC with
    Linux. It's not $$ issue. Long story.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Brian Wakem
    > Email: http://homepage.ntlworld.com/b.wakem/myemail.png
     
    yamuna, Sep 25, 2005
    #9
  10. yamuna

    yamuna Guest

    > No, it's not safe. I

    I am glad I asked. I'd rather be cautious and play safe, i.e not lose
    time fixing too many unexpected problem and proceed with my goal.

    >If you trust Windows pop-ups over the people in this newsgroup,
    >I'm wondering why you asked us.

    I don't trust those but
    life's situation has been pretty bad and my project to build a PC on
    my own (bought parts last year June) , put Linux had been postponed I
    am stuck with windows still. I just need to get started on Perl but I
    will get to linux and also rid of IE. I have to do it with my pace; I
    will get there.

    >That said, let me provide you with some links,

    Thanks. I did google search and saw activePerl but it helps to know
    which one is good for what purpose, etc.

    <snip>
     
    yamuna, Sep 25, 2005
    #10
  11. yamuna

    yamuna Guest

    Thanks everyone.
     
    yamuna, Sep 25, 2005
    #11
  12. yamuna

    John Bokma Guest

    "Tassilo v. Parseval" <> wrote:

    > cygwin or even install a real Linux. Perl is a lot more fun and also
    > easier if you have access to a C compiler and a make-tool.


    For Windows there is nmake (
    http://johnbokma.com/perl/make-for-windows.html )

    and it was just last month or so that for the very first time I had to
    compile some C (PAR) for Perl on Windows.

    In short: for learning Perl you probably don't need C (which probably has
    to be learned as well) for the next few years. Make, maybe, but nmake
    should do the trick unless you do need a C compiler.

    Wrt cygwin, I agree. Have been using it for several months, and if you are
    an XP user, just don't install it. And if you're a Unix user: you might be
    better of without cygwin and XP, or you might be able to get away by
    installing some GNU ports (ls, rm, etc.). (IMHO).

    --
    John Small Perl scripts: http://johnbokma.com/perl/
    Perl programmer available: http://castleamber.com/
    Happy Customers: http://castleamber.com/testimonials.html
     
    John Bokma, Sep 25, 2005
    #12
  13. yamuna

    yamuna Guest

    > In short: for learning Perl you probably don't need C (which probably has
    >to be learned as well) for the next few years. Make, maybe, but nmake
    >should do the trick unless you do need a C compiler.


    I know C++ (not a pro but decent) and a bit of C terms. Plan to get
    Linux and hope to learn system programming using C. (These are all my
    dreams.)

    Thanks.
     
    yamuna, Sep 25, 2005
    #13
  14. Also sprach John Bokma:

    > "Tassilo v. Parseval" <> wrote:
    >
    >> cygwin or even install a real Linux. Perl is a lot more fun and also
    >> easier if you have access to a C compiler and a make-tool.

    >
    > For Windows there is nmake (
    > http://johnbokma.com/perl/make-for-windows.html )
    >
    > and it was just last month or so that for the very first time I had to
    > compile some C (PAR) for Perl on Windows.
    >
    > In short: for learning Perl you probably don't need C (which probably has
    > to be learned as well) for the next few years. Make, maybe, but nmake
    > should do the trick unless you do need a C compiler.


    I mentioned the C compiler with respect to the installation of some
    modules. nmake would be the first thing to install next to ActivePerl
    because ppm is IMHO only an extremely poor replacement for the CPAN
    shell. Most of the time it doesn't work and if it worked then the module
    to be installed is most likely not available as ppm package.

    > Wrt cygwin, I agree. Have been using it for several months, and if you are
    > an XP user, just don't install it. And if you're a Unix user: you might be
    > better of without cygwin and XP, or you might be able to get away by
    > installing some GNU ports (ls, rm, etc.). (IMHO).


    cygwin is just like ppm another poor replacement for the real thing.

    Tassilo
    --
    use bigint;
    $n=71423350343770280161397026330337371139054411854220053437565440;
    $m=-8,;;$_=$n&(0xff)<<$m,,$_>>=$m,,print+chr,,while(($m+=8)<=200);
     
    Tassilo v. Parseval, Sep 25, 2005
    #14
  15. On Sun, 25 Sep 2005, John Bokma wrote:

    > "Tassilo v. Parseval" <> wrote:
    >
    > > cygwin or even install a real Linux. Perl is a lot more fun and also
    > > easier if you have access to a C compiler and a make-tool.


    Are you chaps really answering the question (at the assumed level of
    the those who are likely to ask it), or are you just having a
    discussion at your own level?

    Anyone considering starting Perl, and wanting to work on Windows,
    indeed has these choices, between a Win-native Perl (such as
    ActiveState Perl, or the Indigoperl package for those who happen to
    want an easy CGI bundle including Perl and Apache) on the one hand, or
    Cygwin on the other hand.

    But they aren't really in competition to each other. Anyone wanting
    to go the Cygwin route should take a good look at what it is and what
    they'd be getting. To put it briefly: a unix-like environment inside
    Windows (and then, Perl inside that, along with a vast range of free
    application and development software). If that's what they want, then
    go ahead - I'd certainly install it, for lots of good reasons - but
    I wouldn't see it as an /alternative/ to native Windows Perl.

    On the other hand, if the questioner just wants to get started, and
    wants to use Perl to drive Windows applications in a Windows-
    flavoured environment, then a native Perl such as ActiveState would be
    a good choice now. Btw. that comes with quite a neat HTML-ised
    interface to the Perl documentation, both the core and the
    Win-specific. Later, one can certainly consider installing Cygwin
    Perl, and having the best of both worlds without having to leave
    Windows. (I'm going to have to add that running a real OS is yet
    another option, but I'm trying to answer on the assumption of a
    questioner who wants to stick with Windows as the actual OS).

    > For Windows there is nmake (
    > http://johnbokma.com/perl/make-for-windows.html )


    OK

    > and it was just last month or so that for the very first time I had
    > to compile some C (PAR) for Perl on Windows.


    Haven't done that myself, I must admit: AIUI if you want to build Perl
    stuff for native Windows, then you need the same C compiler as one's
    Perl installation was built with, nicht wahr? Which might mean a
    chargeable licensed product. I've no problem in principle with paying
    the money, but it's a considerable drag keeping track of software
    licences...

    > In short: for learning Perl you probably don't need C (which
    > probably has to be learned as well) for the next few years. Make,
    > maybe, but nmake should do the trick unless you do need a C
    > compiler.


    Indeed. And as Tassilo rightly said about native Perl versus Cygwin,
    it's easier to learn one thing at once than two. Put Cygwin off for
    later - maybe even after having sampled Perl under a unix-like OS such
    as linux.

    > Wrt cygwin, I agree. Have been using it for several months, and if
    > you are an XP user, just don't install it.

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Pardon me?

    As a matter of fact we install the cygwin core on all our windows XP
    systems (supported desktops and laptops), if only to get the free X
    Windows server, so that our Win-based users can also work comfortably
    with the linux systems. Having done that, the users can have as many
    of the cygwin applications as they want - Perl not excluded.

    hope this makes some kind of sense.
     
    Alan J. Flavell, Sep 25, 2005
    #15
  16. Also sprach Alan J. Flavell:
    > On Sun, 25 Sep 2005, John Bokma wrote:
    >
    >> "Tassilo v. Parseval" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> > cygwin or even install a real Linux. Perl is a lot more fun and also
    >> > easier if you have access to a C compiler and a make-tool.

    >
    > Are you chaps really answering the question (at the assumed level of
    > the those who are likely to ask it), or are you just having a
    > discussion at your own level?


    Isn't it generally assumed to be accidental if a question of a poster is
    in fact answered? ;-)

    Having said that, I wouldn't consider it a discussion at our own level.
    I genuinly believe that cygwin should not be recommended to a beginner,
    much less so to someone beginning to learn Perl. So I suggested one of
    the native Windows distributions even though I know at least a few
    shortcomings of ActivePerl. I reckon those quirks are less annoying
    to a beginner than some of cygwin's peculiarities.

    >> and it was just last month or so that for the very first time I had
    >> to compile some C (PAR) for Perl on Windows.

    >
    > Haven't done that myself, I must admit: AIUI if you want to build Perl
    > stuff for native Windows, then you need the same C compiler as one's
    > Perl installation was built with, nicht wahr?


    This is what they say although in my experience this is not necessarily
    true. At least on Solaris I was able to make modules run with both the
    gcc and SUN's native compiler...for the same perl.

    > Which might mean a chargeable licensed product. I've no problem in
    > principle with paying the money, but it's a considerable drag keeping
    > track of software licences...


    MS now distributes a compiler kit for no charge which can be used with
    ActivePerl. However, and so I am back to the original point I raised,
    it's still not always trivial as many modules appear to be written with
    the gcc in mind and thus make use of extenions not part of any
    C-standard.

    >> Wrt cygwin, I agree. Have been using it for several months, and if
    >> you are an XP user, just don't install it.

    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    >
    > Pardon me?


    [...]

    I have reasons for some grievances of my own when it comes to cygwin.
    But those are better discussed somewhere else.

    Tassilo
    --
    use bigint;
    $n=71423350343770280161397026330337371139054411854220053437565440;
    $m=-8,;;$_=$n&(0xff)<<$m,,$_>>=$m,,print+chr,,while(($m+=8)<=200);
     
    Tassilo v. Parseval, Sep 25, 2005
    #16
  17. yamuna

    John Bokma Guest

    "Tassilo v. Parseval" <> wrote:

    > Also sprach John Bokma:
    >
    >> "Tassilo v. Parseval" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> cygwin or even install a real Linux. Perl is a lot more fun and also
    >>> easier if you have access to a C compiler and a make-tool.

    >>
    >> For Windows there is nmake (
    >> http://johnbokma.com/perl/make-for-windows.html )
    >>
    >> and it was just last month or so that for the very first time I had
    >> to compile some C (PAR) for Perl on Windows.
    >>
    >> In short: for learning Perl you probably don't need C (which probably
    >> has to be learned as well) for the next few years. Make, maybe, but
    >> nmake should do the trick unless you do need a C compiler.

    >
    > I mentioned the C compiler with respect to the installation of some
    > modules. nmake would be the first thing to install next to ActivePerl
    > because ppm is IMHO only an extremely poor replacement for the CPAN
    > shell.


    You might be right. However, it works most of the times here. I rarely
    have to use nmake. As for a C compiler, only recently with PAR.

    > Most of the time it doesn't work


    Weird, my experience is: most of the time it works :)

    > and if it worked then the
    > module to be installed is most likely not available as ppm package.


    Huh? And AFAIK, you can use the CPAN shell with ActiveState. I stick
    with ppm for now.

    >> Wrt cygwin, I agree. Have been using it for several months, and if
    >> you are an XP user, just don't install it. And if you're a Unix user:
    >> you might be better of without cygwin and XP, or you might be able to
    >> get away by installing some GNU ports (ls, rm, etc.). (IMHO).

    >
    > cygwin is just like ppm another poor replacement for the real thing.


    Yup, the reason that I removed it was that it was confusing to me most
    of the time :)

    --
    John Small Perl scripts: http://johnbokma.com/perl/
    Perl programmer available: http://castleamber.com/
    Happy Customers: http://castleamber.com/testimonials.html
     
    John Bokma, Sep 26, 2005
    #17
  18. yamuna

    John Bokma Guest

    "Alan J. Flavell" <> wrote:

    > On Sun, 25 Sep 2005, John Bokma wrote:
    >
    >> "Tassilo v. Parseval" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> > cygwin or even install a real Linux. Perl is a lot more fun and

    also
    >> > easier if you have access to a C compiler and a make-tool.

    >
    > Are you chaps really answering the question (at the assumed level of
    > the those who are likely to ask it), or are you just having a
    > discussion at your own level?


    Is this Usenet? :)

    [ snip ]

    >> and it was just last month or so that for the very first time I had
    >> to compile some C (PAR) for Perl on Windows.

    >
    > Haven't done that myself, I must admit: AIUI if you want to build Perl
    > stuff for native Windows, then you need the same C compiler as one's
    > Perl installation was built with, nicht wahr? Which might mean a
    > chargeable licensed product.


    No, since MS makes the command line stuff available for free. That's how
    I got it working :-D.

    > I've no problem in principle with paying
    > the money, but it's a considerable drag keeping track of software
    > licences...


    You don't, see above :).

    >> Wrt cygwin, I agree. Have been using it for several months, and if
    >> you are an XP user, just don't install it.

    >
    > Pardon me?


    I think you deleted the IMHO part. Also, it was an answer to the OP, who
    wants to learn Perl ;-)

    > As a matter of fact we install the cygwin core on all our windows XP
    > systems (supported desktops and laptops), if only to get the free X
    > Windows server, so that our Win-based users can also work comfortably
    > with the linux systems. Having done that, the users can have as many
    > of the cygwin applications as they want - Perl not excluded.
    >
    > hope this makes some kind of sense.


    Yes, it does. Differences in requirements. Also, why not VNC?

    --
    John Small Perl scripts: http://johnbokma.com/perl/
    Perl programmer available: http://castleamber.com/
    Happy Customers: http://castleamber.com/testimonials.html
     
    John Bokma, Sep 26, 2005
    #18
  19. yamuna

    John Bokma Guest

    John Bokma, Sep 26, 2005
    #19
  20. On Mon, 25 Sep 2005, John Bokma wrote:

    > >> Wrt cygwin, I agree. Have been using it for several months, and if
    > >> you are an XP user, just don't install it.

    >
    > "Alan J. Flavell" <> wrote:
    >
    > > Pardon me?

    >
    > I think you deleted the IMHO part.


    With respect, I think you expressed yourself too cryptically for a
    clear understanding of your intention.

    > Also, it was an answer to the OP, who wants to learn Perl ;-)


    I already agreed that for a Windows user, installing a native Windows
    port such as ActiveState is probably the best first move, so it seems
    we are in agreement.

    I just didn't understand your specific reference to "XP" (as opposed
    to Windows in general, maybe).

    [...]
    > > hope this makes some kind of sense.

    >
    > Yes, it does. Differences in requirements. Also, why not VNC?


    An interesting question, but would seem to take us a bit too far off
    topic for this group, I fear. Perhaps my throwaway remark explaining
    X as our original motivation for installing cygwin base was itself too
    far off-topic - if so, then my apologies.
     
    Alan J. Flavell, Sep 26, 2005
    #20
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