Linked List program

Discussion in 'Java' started by DeAndrea Monroe, Oct 2, 2010.

  1. I am constructing a program that stores names and numbers in a
    directory. I have constructed a portion of the code, that can be found
    here http://code.google.com/p/cschelp/source/checkout, but I keep
    getting the same error when I try to run or build the program.
    avac *.java
    >The system cannot find the file specified.
    >java phonedir
    >The system cannot find the file specified.


    I'm using the application SciTe.
     
    DeAndrea Monroe, Oct 2, 2010
    #1
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  2. DeAndrea Monroe

    Eric Sosman Guest

    On 10/2/2010 5:17 PM, DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > I am constructing a program that stores names and numbers in a
    > directory. I have constructed a portion of the code, that can be found
    > here http://code.google.com/p/cschelp/source/checkout, but I keep
    > getting the same error when I try to run or build the program.
    > avac *.java


    Copy/paste error? The command to run the Java compiler is
    usually "javac", not "avac".

    >> The system cannot find the file specified.


    >> java phonedir
    >> The system cannot find the file specified.


    I suspect you don't have Java and the Java Development Kit (JDK,
    which includes javac and other essentials) installed on your system,
    or if they're installed you haven't properly introduced them to your
    command-line environment (e.g., by putting them on your "path"). What
    happens if you just type

    java
    or
    javac

    at the command prompt, with no other parameters? Perhaps the system
    is telling you that it can't find those programs, rather than telling
    you "You've written bad Java."

    > I'm using the application SciTe.


    Sorry; I have no idea what SciTe might be.

    Incidentally, you'd do well to acquaint yourself with the usual
    conventions for naming things in Java: Your class should probably be
    PhoneDir or Phonedir (in PhoneDir.java or Phonedir.java). You'll
    also want to break the bad habit of putting things in the default
    package, but perhaps you're just beginning to learn the language and
    haven't encountered the "package" statement yet. Also, there's the
    wide and wonderful world of "generics" yet to open before you; those
    undecorated Lists and LinkedLists are widely frowned upon -- but again,
    perhaps that's a topic your class hasn't reached yet.

    --
    Eric Sosman
    lid
     
    Eric Sosman, Oct 2, 2010
    #2
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  3. Thanks for the help. I'm supposed to be using NetBeans but I can't
    seem to get it to download correctly. Have you checked out any of the
    code I have written?
     
    DeAndrea Monroe, Oct 3, 2010
    #3
  4. DeAndrea Monroe

    Eric Sosman Guest

    On 10/3/2010 9:12 AM, DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > Thanks for the help. I'm supposed to be using NetBeans but I can't
    > seem to get it to download correctly. Have you checked out any of the
    > code I have written?


    (When replying to a message, it's considered good form to quote
    enough of the original to establish context. Not the whole thing,
    mind you, "just enough.")

    Since you didn't describe what sort of troubles you're having with
    NetBeans, I don't know what advice to give to solve them. All I can
    offer is that "It works for me," which isn't much comfort. Perhaps
    your classmates or instructor can help you get started.

    As for your code, I looked at it briefly (as my earlier remarks
    indicate). It's clearly a beginner's effort and looks like a class
    assignment, which is why I surmise you're in an instructional setting
    of some kind. There is much that could be done to spiff up your code,
    but it would probably just increase a starting student's confusion.
    I imagine your class will get around to the niftier stuff once the
    basics are behind you.

    --
    Eric Sosman
    lid
     
    Eric Sosman, Oct 3, 2010
    #4
  5. On 2010-10-03 15:12, DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > Thanks for the help. I'm supposed to be using NetBeans but I can't
    > seem to get it to download correctly. Have you checked out any of the
    > code I have written?


    I have. The output below shows what the Java compiler has to say about
    it. Remember that Java is an explicitly typed language. You have to
    provide a type when you introduce a new variable.

    $ javac anagrams.java
    anagrams.java:23: cannot find symbol
    symbol : variable word
    location: class anagrams
    word = new String();
    ^
    anagrams.java:24: cannot find symbol
    symbol : variable signature
    location: class anagrams
    signature = new String();
    ^

    [snipped]

    45 errors


    /August

    --
    The competent programmer is fully aware of the limited size of his own
    skull. He therefore approaches his task with full humility, and avoids
    clever tricks like the plague. --Edsger Dijkstra
     
    August Karlstrom, Oct 3, 2010
    #5
  6. DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > Thanks for the help. I'm supposed to be using NetBeans but I can't
    > seem to get it to download correctly. Have you checked out any of the
    > code I have written?


    I'm with Eric, I have no idea what the problem is, however I'd have to
    assume you at least get to the http://netbeans.org/downloads/index.html
    page and can click a button for a download selection. Is the download itself
    failing, or is it when you start the installation of the download? Did you
    go for Netbeans 6.9; in which case do you have a JDK 1.6 installed (as the
    download/install instructions require)?

    Might as well get Netbeans up and running first before discussing code.
    Although if you do have a JDK installed (don't worry about it being 1.6 if
    you're not installing Netbeans, 1.5 is OK too at this stage if you already
    have a JDK installed; I haven't used SciTE for a long time but I seem to
    recall it's a pure text editor) then

    java -version

    on the command line will tell you. If you're convinced you have one but the
    above doesn't show the version details then check your path.

    If you do have a JDK then (this follows on others' suggestions) modify your
    classes to have a package statement at the top of each source file. As an
    example, if you put in

    package org.deandrea.assignments;

    then also create a directory structure like

    org/
    deandrea/
    assignments/
    PhoneDir.java
    Anagrams.java
    Count.java

    (Note the case changes to the class names; also make them in the source).

    Once you have a directory structure like this, and you have a javac and java
    in your path, if you have a comamnd line open in the directory that contains
    "org",

    javac org/deandrea/assignments/*.java
    (or one by one)

    and

    java org.deandrea.assignments.PhoneDir

    should all work (in the sense of compiling and running). Once you're at that
    stage we can help out with the code itself.

    AHS
    --
    The difference between a moral man and a man of honor is that the
    latter regrets a discreditable act, even when it has worked and he has
    not been caught. -- H.L. Mencken
     
    Arved Sandstrom, Oct 3, 2010
    #6
  7. > "I'm with Eric, I have no idea what the problem is, however I'd have to
    > assume you at least get to thehttp://netbeans.org/downloads/index.html
    > page and can click a button for a download selection. Is the download itself
    > failing, or is it when you start the installation of the download? Did you
    > go for Netbeans 6.9; in which case do you have a JDK 1.6 installed (as the
    > download/install instructions require)?"
    >


    I have downloaded it now and I'm not having problems using it.
    However, I keep getting the same error saying cannot find symbol and
    it all starts with me declaring the linkedlist name as phone. The
    program isn't recognizing the name and anytime it is used throughout
    the program it doesn't work. It tells me to creat a class named phone
    but that doesn't make sense to me because all of the code is supposed
    to be included in a linkedlist.



    > "If you do have a JDK then (this follows on others' suggestions) modify your
    > classes to have a package statement at the top of each source file. As an
    > example, if you put in
    >
    > package org.deandrea.assignments;
    >
    > then also create a directory structure like
    >
    > org/
    >     deandrea/
    >         assignments/
    >             PhoneDir.java
    >             Anagrams.java
    >             Count.java
    >
    > (Note the case changes to the class names; also make them in the source).
    >
    > Once you have a directory structure like this, and you have a javac and java
    > in your path, if you have a comamnd line open in the directory that contains
    > "org",
    >
    > javac org/deandrea/assignments/*.java
    > (or one by one)
    >
    > and
    >
    > java org.deandrea.assignments.PhoneDir
    >
    > should all work (in the sense of compiling and running). Once you're at that
    > stage we can help out with the code itself."



    I'm kind of confused as to what's supposed to be done here. I've used
    Java in previous classes but never this intense. I'm a lot more
    comfortable with Ruby but I don't have an option to use it here.
     
    DeAndrea Monroe, Oct 4, 2010
    #7
  8. DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    >> "I'm with Eric, I have no idea what the problem is, however I'd have
    >> to assume you at least get to
    >> thehttp://netbeans.org/downloads/index.html
    >> page and can click a button for a download selection. Is the
    >> download itself failing, or is it when you start the installation of
    >> the download? Did you go for Netbeans 6.9; in which case do you have
    >> a JDK 1.6 installed (as the download/install instructions require)?"

    >
    > I have downloaded it now and I'm not having problems using it.
    > However, I keep getting the same error saying cannot find symbol and
    > it all starts with me declaring the linkedlist name as phone. The
    > program isn't recognizing the name and anytime it is used throughout
    > the program it doesn't work. It tells me to creat a class named phone
    > but that doesn't make sense to me because all of the code is supposed
    > to be included in a linkedlist.


    See comments below.

    [ SNIP ]
    >
    > I'm kind of confused as to what's supposed to be done here. I've used
    > Java in previous classes but never this intense. I'm a lot more
    > comfortable with Ruby but I don't have an option to use it here.


    Now that you're in NetBeans (abbrev. NB) don't worry about the command-line
    stuff I described. However, certain immediate points come to mind:

    1) I still strongly recommend putting your classes in a package;

    2) method definitions don't have a ; right after the signature. It's

    public void foo() {
    // stuff
    }

    not

    public void foo();
    {
    // stuff
    }

    3) I wouldn't be using static methods here but this may be where you guys
    have gotten to in instruction; I'll leave it at that. However, it does mean
    if you want to have the "phone" variable, a LinkedList, visible to your
    static "operations" methods, that you need to have a class variable instead,
    basically a

    private static LinkedList phone;

    declaration at the top-level of the class (not inside a method, including
    main()).

    4) There are a number of other syntax issues, like erroneous method
    signatures, but once you've cleared up the above you should find those
    straightforward to solve.

    As to your design question, think of it like this: your "phone directory" is
    stored as a LinkedList which is referenced by the "phone" variable in your
    PhoneDir class. Down the road, if you move away from statics, you'd most
    likely have an *instance* of the PhoneDir class, which internally has a
    reference still to a LinkedList.

    For what it's worth, given the stage of Java that you are at, I commend you
    on the clarity and structure of your code. I have to *work* with people,
    intermediate and senior developers some of them, that could take some
    pointers from you.

    AHS
    --
    The difference between a moral man and a man of honor is that the
    latter regrets a discreditable act, even when it has worked and he has
    not been caught. -- H.L. Mencken
     
    Arved Sandstrom, Oct 4, 2010
    #8
  9. On Oct 3, 9:25 pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:

    > "1) I still strongly recommend putting your classes in a package;"

    Are you referring to all of the classes I'm using? Because now I'm
    getting the error for the SimpleIO saying that it can't find the
    symbol as well as DirectoryRecord giving the same problem? Should I
    make each of those seperate classes in the package as well?



    >" 3) I wouldn't be using static methods here but this may be where you guys
    > have gotten to in instruction; I'll leave it at that. However, it does mean
    > if you want to have the "phone" variable, a LinkedList, visible to your
    > static "operations" methods, that you need to have a class variable instead,
    > basically a
    >
    > private static LinkedList phone;
    >
    > declaration at the top-level of the class (not inside a method, including
    > main())."


    This really helped get the other problems I was having taken away.
    Thanks.
     
    DeAndrea Monroe, Oct 4, 2010
    #9
  10. DeAndrea Monroe

    markspace Guest

    On 10/3/2010 6:46 PM, DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > On Oct 3, 9:25 pm, "Arved Sandstrom"<> wrote:
    >
    >> "1) I still strongly recommend putting your classes in a package;"

    > Are you referring to all of the classes I'm using? Because now I'm
    > getting the error for the SimpleIO saying that it can't find the
    > symbol as well as DirectoryRecord giving the same problem? Should I
    > make each of those seperate classes in the package as well?



    There's no simple, intuitive answer to "I'm getting an error," other
    than perhaps "RTFM" or maybe "l34rn 2 c0de". I realize you are new at
    this, but understanding how to describe problems to your colleagues is
    part of your education too. I didn't notice anyone point you at
    SSCCE.org yet so here goes:

    <http://sscce.org/>

    I'm betting however that you fubar'd the package command somehow. Can
    you describe how you added it? There's additional refactoring (read:
    sed/grep style search and replace) to be done when you move a class into
    a new package.


    Incidentally, this sort of stuff that works much better with someone
    actually looking at your screen. When you are just learning and just
    started with a new IDE, it will be much much faster you to head down to
    the school computer lab and sit where a lab tech can answer questions,
    and you have a couple of other students there who also can see directly
    what is going on and fix errors much much faster. You (and your
    parents' tax dollars) are paying for that lab so why not use it?

    >>
    >> private static LinkedList phone;

    >
    > This really helped get the other problems I was having taken away.
    > Thanks.



    Yeah, all your problems are basic problems with the fundamentals of the
    language. This goes much faster if you can get someone to look over
    your shoulder and make suggestions.
     
    markspace, Oct 4, 2010
    #10
  11. On Oct 3, 10:36 pm, markspace <> wrote:

    > "There's no simple, intuitive answer to "I'm getting an error," other
    > than perhaps "RTFM" or maybe "l34rn 2 c0de".  I realize you are new at
    > this, but understanding how to describe problems to your colleagues is
    > part of your education too.  I didn't notice anyone point you at
    > SSCCE.org yet so here goes:
    >
    > <http://sscce.org/>"


    Thanks for the site, I will be sure to use it. The reason I didn't go
    into too much detail about my errors was because the person I was
    talking to earlier knew what program I was using to compile my
    program.


    > "Yeah, all your problems are basic problems with the fundamentals of the
    > language.  This goes much faster if you can get someone to look over
    > your shoulder and make suggestions."


    I don't really have an option to have someone looking at my code
    directly. We have a lab at the school I attend and when I tried to set
    an appointment but I never got a response. This was an option for me
    to try to use to get a better understanding at what I'm doing from
    people who have done these forms of assignments.
     
    DeAndrea Monroe, Oct 4, 2010
    #11
  12. DeAndrea Monroe

    markspace Guest

    On 10/3/2010 8:00 PM, DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > The reason I didn't go
    > into too much detail about my errors was because the person I was
    > talking to earlier knew what program I was using to compile my
    > program.



    I saw your original post and your link to code.google.com. I didn't see
    SimpleIO there. Did I miss it? In other words, your example was not
    complete, as SSCCE requests.


    > I tried to set
    > an appointment but I never got a response.



    This is odd to me. When I attended college, we had several labs, all
    with posted hours (granted, few were open all day, esp. on Sunday). All
    labs were walk-in: no appointment, you just wandered in the door.

    What school are you attending, out of curiosity?
     
    markspace, Oct 4, 2010
    #12
  13. DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > On Oct 3, 9:25 pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:
    >
    >> "1) I still strongly recommend putting your classes in a package;"

    > Are you referring to all of the classes I'm using? Because now I'm
    > getting the error for the SimpleIO saying that it can't find the
    > symbol as well as DirectoryRecord giving the same problem? Should I
    > make each of those seperate classes in the package as well?

    [ SNIP ]

    That's right. Java packaging is mostly just that - packaging. Source files
    are set up in a directory hierarchy, in some arbitrary root folder, and as
    source files are placed in subdirectories their package declaration (at the
    top of the source file) must match where they are in that hierarchy. The
    packaging is both for organization - my X-type functionality is grouped
    *here* kind of thing - but also for applying code access modifiers.

    If you are in one class in package A and you want to reference a class in
    package B, that's where "import" statements come in. In this particular
    case, where you have 3 classes (PhoneDir.java, SimpleIO.java,
    DirectoryRecord.java), you may as well place them all in the same package
    directory, but then the package declarations must also match.

    One reason for not using the default package (no package declaration) is
    that it makes *any* packaging difficult. You can't be in one class in a
    named package and import another in the default. So for this and other
    reasons (as in, out in the real world your code will intermingle with other
    peoples' code) you want typically not to use the default package.

    AHS
    --
    The difference between a moral man and a man of honor is that the
    latter regrets a discreditable act, even when it has worked and he has
    not been caught. -- H.L. Mencken
     
    Arved Sandstrom, Oct 4, 2010
    #13
  14. On Oct 4, 6:49 am, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:
    > DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > > On Oct 3, 9:25 pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:


    >
    > If you are in one class in package A and you want to reference a class in
    > package B, that's where "import" statements come in. In this particular
    > case, where you have 3 classes (PhoneDir.java, SimpleIO.java,
    > DirectoryRecord.java), you may as well place them all in the same package
    > directory, but then the package declarations must also match.


    I put these classes in a package and they all became their own
    seperate package. I don't know if that was the right thing to do but
    the erros went away. There are now three seperate additional tabs at
    the top of the program containing SimpleIO.java, DirectoryRecord.java
    but the other is main.java. I don't know how to change that.
     
    DeAndrea Monroe, Oct 4, 2010
    #14
  15. On Oct 4, 6:14 pm, DeAndrea Monroe <> wrote:
    > On Oct 4, 6:49 am, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:
    >
    > > DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > > > On Oct 3, 9:25 pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:

    >
    > > If you are in one class in package A and you want to reference a class in
    > > package B, that's where "import" statements come in. In this particular
    > > case, where you have 3 classes (PhoneDir.java, SimpleIO.java,
    > > DirectoryRecord.java), you may as well place them all in the same package
    > > directory, but then the package declarations must also match.

    >
    > I put these classes in a package and they all became their own
    > seperate package. I don't know if that was the right thing to do but
    > the erros went away. There are now three seperate additional tabs at
    > the top of the program containing SimpleIO.java, DirectoryRecord.java
    > but the other is main.java. I don't know how to change that.


    Also, I'm supposed to be storing the names and numbers into a linked
    list but I haven't used a node at all in the program. Is this a
    problem?
     
    DeAndrea Monroe, Oct 4, 2010
    #15
  16. DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > On Oct 4, 6:49 am, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:
    >> DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    >>> On Oct 3, 9:25 pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:

    >
    >>
    >> If you are in one class in package A and you want to reference a
    >> class in package B, that's where "import" statements come in. In
    >> this particular case, where you have 3 classes (PhoneDir.java,
    >> SimpleIO.java, DirectoryRecord.java), you may as well place them all
    >> in the same package directory, but then the package declarations
    >> must also match.

    >
    > I put these classes in a package and they all became their own
    > seperate package. I don't know if that was the right thing to do but
    > the erros went away. There are now three seperate additional tabs at
    > the top of the program containing SimpleIO.java, DirectoryRecord.java
    > but the other is main.java. I don't know how to change that.


    No idea what you mean by tabs - must be a Google Code thing? And no idea why
    you'd have a "main.java"; as written, PhoneDir *is* your main class.

    All three classes in their own named package, with nothing in the default,
    is exactly on the right track.

    AHS
    --
    The difference between a moral man and a man of honor is that the
    latter regrets a discreditable act, even when it has worked and he has
    not been caught. -- H.L. Mencken
     
    Arved Sandstrom, Oct 4, 2010
    #16
  17. On Oct 4, 6:53 pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:


    > No idea what you mean by tabs - must be a Google Code thing? And no idea why
    > you'd have a "main.java"; as written, PhoneDir *is* your main class.


    When I started the program, it asked if I wanted a main class and I
    checked yes but when I did that, it made the name of the program
    main.java and I don't know how to change that.
     
    DeAndrea Monroe, Oct 5, 2010
    #17
  18. DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > On Oct 4, 6:14 pm, DeAndrea Monroe <> wrote:
    >> On Oct 4, 6:49 am, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    >>>> On Oct 3, 9:25 pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:

    >>
    >>> If you are in one class in package A and you want to reference a
    >>> class in package B, that's where "import" statements come in. In
    >>> this particular case, where you have 3 classes (PhoneDir.java,
    >>> SimpleIO.java, DirectoryRecord.java), you may as well place them
    >>> all in the same package directory, but then the package
    >>> declarations must also match.

    >>
    >> I put these classes in a package and they all became their own
    >> seperate package. I don't know if that was the right thing to do but
    >> the erros went away. There are now three seperate additional tabs at
    >> the top of the program containing SimpleIO.java, DirectoryRecord.java
    >> but the other is main.java. I don't know how to change that.

    >
    > Also, I'm supposed to be storing the names and numbers into a linked
    > list but I haven't used a node at all in the program. Is this a
    > problem?


    Well, OK, *this* is a pedagogical question actually. :) You're using a
    linked-list implementation made available by the standard Java libraries,
    namely the JDK. So *you* don't worry about nodes. Now, the question is, is
    this what the assignment asked for or allowed, or does your instructor
    actually want you to write a linked list (I certainly hope not). You might
    want to clarify this.

    AHS
    --
    The difference between a moral man and a man of honor is that the
    latter regrets a discreditable act, even when it has worked and he has
    not been caught. -- H.L. Mencken
     
    Arved Sandstrom, Oct 5, 2010
    #18
  19. On Oct 4, 7:25 pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:
    > DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > > On Oct 4, 6:14 pm, DeAndrea Monroe <> wrote:
    > >> On Oct 4, 6:49 am, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:

    >
    > >>> DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > >>>> On Oct 3, 9:25 pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:

    >
    > >>> If you are in one class in package A and you want to reference a
    > >>> class in package B, that's where "import" statements come in. In
    > >>> this particular case, where you have 3 classes (PhoneDir.java,
    > >>> SimpleIO.java, DirectoryRecord.java), you may as well place them
    > >>> all in the same package directory, but then the package
    > >>> declarations must also match.

    >
    > >> I put these classes in a package and they all became their own
    > >> seperate package. I don't know if that was the right thing to do but
    > >> the erros went away. There are now three seperate additional tabs at
    > >> the top of the program containing SimpleIO.java, DirectoryRecord.java
    > >> but the other is main.java. I don't know how to change that.

    >
    > > Also, I'm supposed to be storing the names and numbers into a linked
    > > list but I haven't used a node at all in the program. Is this a
    > > problem?

    >
    > Well, OK, *this* is a pedagogical question actually. :) You're using a
    > linked-list implementation made available by the standard Java libraries,
    > namely the JDK. So *you* don't worry about nodes. Now, the question is, is
    > this what the assignment asked for or allowed, or does your instructor
    > actually want you to write a linked list (I certainly hope not). You might
    > want to clarify this.
    >

    He told us to use the library so I'm assuming that I don't have to use
    nodes. There is an updated version of the program on the same link.
    I'm still recieveing a few errors like:
    cannot find symbol for equalsIgnoreCase
    illegal start of expression
    cannot find symbol for method set and curr
     
    DeAndrea Monroe, Oct 5, 2010
    #19
  20. DeAndrea Monroe wrote:
    > On Oct 4, 6:53 pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> No idea what you mean by tabs - must be a Google Code thing? And no
    >> idea why you'd have a "main.java"; as written, PhoneDir *is* your
    >> main class.

    >
    > When I started the program, it asked if I wanted a main class and I
    > checked yes but when I did that, it made the name of the program
    > main.java and I don't know how to change that.


    Ahh, the tabs of open classes in the NetBeans editor, gotcha.

    Operating on the assumption that you created a new Java project, namely a
    Java application, and ended up with a Main class in some package that
    NetBeans gave you, then added your classes to that package, simply delete
    the Main class in the Project view. For running from the IDE you can right
    click on your project in Project view, choose Properties > Run, and set
    PhoneDir as your main class.

    AHS
    --
    The difference between a moral man and a man of honor is that the
    latter regrets a discreditable act, even when it has worked and he has
    not been caught. -- H.L. Mencken
     
    Arved Sandstrom, Oct 5, 2010
    #20
    1. Advertising

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