Links and accessibility

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Chris Beall, Jul 21, 2003.

  1. Chris Beall

    Chris Beall Guest

    Consider the following HTML fragment:

    <a href="one/html"><img src="http:some.url" alt=""><br>One</a>

    Both the image and the text label link to the same place. The alt
    keyword is present to pacify the W3C HTML 4.01 strict validator, but is
    empty, which Bobby objects to.
    It seems to me that if I code alt="One", a screen reader would reach the
    link and say, "One One", which is confusing, rather than just "One"
    which isn't (assuming 'One' is a more meaningful label).

    Assuming that my intent is to give the page the best possible
    accessibility rather than to obtain Bobby certification, which is the
    best approach?

    Chris Beall
     
    Chris Beall, Jul 21, 2003
    #1
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  2. While the city slept, Chris Beall <> feverishly
    typed:

    > Consider the following HTML fragment:
    >
    > <a href="one/html"><img src="http:some.url" alt=""><br>One</a>
    >
    > Both the image and the text label link to the same place. The alt
    > keyword is present to pacify the W3C HTML 4.01 strict validator, but
    > is empty, which Bobby objects to.
    > It seems to me that if I code alt="One", a screen reader would reach
    > the link and say, "One One", which is confusing, rather than just
    > "One" which isn't (assuming 'One' is a more meaningful label).
    >
    > Assuming that my intent is to give the page the best possible
    > accessibility rather than to obtain Bobby certification, which is the
    > best approach?


    The alt attribute is there to provide a textual alternative to the image.
    That is what it is there for. If the image is a number '1', then let the
    user know that, otherwise they will just be informed by their user agent
    that there is an image there, but they don't know what it is.

    Cheers,
    Nige

    --
    Nigel Moss.

    Email address is not valid. . Take the dog out!
    http://www.nigenet.org.uk | Boycott E$$O!! http://www.stopesso.com
    "How strange the change from major to minor..."
     
    nice.guy.nige, Jul 21, 2003
    #2
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  3. Chris Beall

    DU Guest

    Chris Beall wrote:
    > Consider the following HTML fragment:
    >
    > <a href="one/html"><img src="http:some.url" alt=""><br>One</a>
    >
    > Both the image and the text label link to the same place. The alt
    > keyword is present to pacify the W3C HTML 4.01 strict validator, but is
    > empty, which Bobby objects to.
    > It seems to me that if I code alt="One", a screen reader would reach the
    > link and say, "One One", which is confusing, rather than just "One"
    > which isn't (assuming 'One' is a more meaningful label).
    >
    > Assuming that my intent is to give the page the best possible
    > accessibility rather than to obtain Bobby certification, which is the
    > best approach?
    >
    > Chris Beall
    >
    >


    Go to Delorie's Lynx viewer.
    http://www.delorie.com/web/lynxview.html
    and then examine your page as if you were using a screen reader. That's
    the best option available for you here. Bobby recommends, gives you
    hints, checkpoints, etc... The alt attribute must be a valid, sensible
    text alternative to the image: no more, no less. And in some cases, I
    personally do not see such text alternative.

    DU
    --
    Javascript and Browser bugs:
    http://www10.brinkster.com/doctorunclear/
     
    DU, Jul 21, 2003
    #3
  4. Chris Beall

    Bill Mason Guest

    On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 00:36:29 GMT, "Chris Beall"
    <> wrote:

    >Both the image and the text label link to the same place. The alt
    >keyword is present to pacify the W3C HTML 4.01 strict validator, but is
    >empty, which Bobby objects to.


    As others have already pointed out how to assess whether or not you
    need an ALT, I'll just stick 2 cents in to say that Bobby flagging any
    instance of alt="" as an error is a bunch of crap. It's a perfectly
    valid thing to do if warranted by the page's/image's context.

    Bill Mason
    Accessible Internet
    http://www.accessibleinter.net/
     
    Bill Mason, Jul 21, 2003
    #4
  5. Chris Beall

    Isofarro Guest

    nice.guy.nige wrote:

    > The alt attribute is there to provide a textual alternative to the image.
    > That is what it is there for. If the image is a number '1', then let the
    > user know that, otherwise they will just be informed by their user agent
    > that there is an image there, but they don't know what it is.


    If the alternative text for the image is what is already visible, then
    alt="" is the correct way to go. Duplicating already accessible content
    isn't good.

    This is a case where Bobby is wrong to complain about empty alt attributes.


    --
    Iso.
    FAQs: http://html-faq.com http://alt-html.org http://allmyfaqs.com/
    Recommended Hosting: http://www.affordablehost.com/
    Web Standards: http://www.webstandards.org/
     
    Isofarro, Jul 21, 2003
    #5
  6. Chris Beall

    Isofarro Guest

    EightNineThree wrote:

    > The alt attribute is intended to supply a text alternative for those who
    > are unable to see the image or who have images turned off.
    > If your image does not present any important contextual information, then
    > the alt attribute should be used, but kept empty.


    also the case with "If your image does not present any _additional_
    contextual information".

    The typical situation in this case is a gallery of images of employees with
    a caption containing their name. Now the reasonable alt attribute for a
    picture of someone is who they are. Since this is already available in the
    form of an accessible caption, alt="" is sufficient.


    --
    Iso.
    FAQs: http://html-faq.com http://alt-html.org http://allmyfaqs.com/
    Recommended Hosting: http://www.affordablehost.com/
    Web Standards: http://www.webstandards.org/
     
    Isofarro, Jul 21, 2003
    #6
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