Looking for any heads up for large attachments in mail sending

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Ron Vecchi, Oct 22, 2003.

  1. Ron Vecchi

    Ron Vecchi Guest

    I've used System.Web.Mail before but have never had the need to send
    attchemnets through it...until now.
    A client of mine would like a form on the website to allow a user to type up
    a message and upload a file. I'm staying away from mailto links.

    So the file and message will be uploaded to the server when the user clicks
    send. The new file and message will be processed and emailed from the
    server to my client.
    I'm tring to get any "heads ups" from any one who has delt with sending
    emails with large attachments(20mb) programmtically.


    What I am thinking is that the user clicks the button and waits(...) from
    the post to the server to be made.
    Then open a new thread that will send the email out(letting the user
    continue on browsing the website without waiting for the email to be sent
    off the server).

    So to me It seems that..
    -------------------------
    1) I have to make sure the new thread doesn't expire befor the email is
    sent.
    2) The thread is completely independant of the parent thread(that is the
    page request should not wait for a response from the new thread)
    2) Make sure the shared host allows large attchments.(webhost4life)
    3) Any thing else you fellow .net people can add.......



    Thanks,
    Ron Vecchi
    Ron Vecchi, Oct 22, 2003
    #1
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  2. Ron,

    Umm...don't do it. <g> For large attachments, a better approach would be to
    send an e-mail that includes a link to download the file from the web site.

    HTH,
    Nicole



    "Ron Vecchi" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I've used System.Web.Mail before but have never had the need to send
    > attchemnets through it...until now.
    > A client of mine would like a form on the website to allow a user to type

    up
    > a message and upload a file. I'm staying away from mailto links.
    >
    > So the file and message will be uploaded to the server when the user

    clicks
    > send. The new file and message will be processed and emailed from the
    > server to my client.
    > I'm tring to get any "heads ups" from any one who has delt with sending
    > emails with large attachments(20mb) programmtically.
    >
    >
    > What I am thinking is that the user clicks the button and waits(...) from
    > the post to the server to be made.
    > Then open a new thread that will send the email out(letting the user
    > continue on browsing the website without waiting for the email to be sent
    > off the server).
    >
    > So to me It seems that..
    > -------------------------
    > 1) I have to make sure the new thread doesn't expire befor the email is
    > sent.
    > 2) The thread is completely independant of the parent thread(that is the
    > page request should not wait for a response from the new thread)
    > 2) Make sure the shared host allows large attchments.(webhost4life)
    > 3) Any thing else you fellow .net people can add.......
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Ron Vecchi
    >
    >
    Nicole Calinoiu, Oct 22, 2003
    #2
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  3. Ron Vecchi

    Ron Vecchi Guest

    Sounds like a good idea, but could you explain why this would be bad.
    The use of this module will be very minimal with low traffic. And will
    likley never see concurrent use.

    I hosting account were on has minimal server storage and if a handful of
    files are saved then we could run over.
    Paying for more storage is not an option because of budget.

    "Nicole Calinoiu" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ron,
    >
    > Umm...don't do it. <g> For large attachments, a better approach would be

    to
    > send an e-mail that includes a link to download the file from the web

    site.
    >
    > HTH,
    > Nicole
    >
    >
    >
    > "Ron Vecchi" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > I've used System.Web.Mail before but have never had the need to send
    > > attchemnets through it...until now.
    > > A client of mine would like a form on the website to allow a user to

    type
    > up
    > > a message and upload a file. I'm staying away from mailto links.
    > >
    > > So the file and message will be uploaded to the server when the user

    > clicks
    > > send. The new file and message will be processed and emailed from the
    > > server to my client.
    > > I'm tring to get any "heads ups" from any one who has delt with sending
    > > emails with large attachments(20mb) programmtically.
    > >
    > >
    > > What I am thinking is that the user clicks the button and waits(...)

    from
    > > the post to the server to be made.
    > > Then open a new thread that will send the email out(letting the user
    > > continue on browsing the website without waiting for the email to be

    sent
    > > off the server).
    > >
    > > So to me It seems that..
    > > -------------------------
    > > 1) I have to make sure the new thread doesn't expire befor the email is
    > > sent.
    > > 2) The thread is completely independant of the parent thread(that is the
    > > page request should not wait for a response from the new thread)
    > > 2) Make sure the shared host allows large attchments.(webhost4life)
    > > 3) Any thing else you fellow .net people can add.......
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Ron Vecchi
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    Ron Vecchi, Oct 22, 2003
    #3
  4. Receiving a 20MB email is generally bad news.

    The attachment encoding will increase this size too, so that 20MB will turn
    out to be an email in the region of 30MB. That will slow down the mail
    servers, and may well fill up your recipient's mailbox, causing their other
    incoming mail to bounce.

    That's before you think about people who collect their mail via dial-up.
    One of our techs sent an 11MB software update to everyone in the company one
    time. That was fine for people who were based in the office, but all the
    guys on the road were shafted, every time they went to collect their mail,
    it choked on that attachment.

    Linking to large files is definitely the "polite" way to send them.

    Will.


    "Ron Vecchi" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Sounds like a good idea, but could you explain why this would be bad.
    > The use of this module will be very minimal with low traffic. And will
    > likley never see concurrent use.
    William Armstrong, Oct 22, 2003
    #4
  5. Ron Vecchi

    Ron Vecchi Guest

    I'm convinced, although the emails are expected to be large by the client
    (CAD files and other manufacturing design files). The system is intended to
    allow for these types of files so my client can quote them. But the
    definate possiblility of over shooting the mailbox limit is still there.

    Gonna go with the email link.

    Thanks

    "William Armstrong" <> wrote in message
    news:#2gc##...
    > Receiving a 20MB email is generally bad news.
    >
    > The attachment encoding will increase this size too, so that 20MB will

    turn
    > out to be an email in the region of 30MB. That will slow down the mail
    > servers, and may well fill up your recipient's mailbox, causing their

    other
    > incoming mail to bounce.
    >
    > That's before you think about people who collect their mail via dial-up.
    > One of our techs sent an 11MB software update to everyone in the company

    one
    > time. That was fine for people who were based in the office, but all the
    > guys on the road were shafted, every time they went to collect their mail,
    > it choked on that attachment.
    >
    > Linking to large files is definitely the "polite" way to send them.
    >
    > Will.
    >
    >
    > "Ron Vecchi" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Sounds like a good idea, but could you explain why this would be bad.
    > > The use of this module will be very minimal with low traffic. And will
    > > likley never see concurrent use.

    >
    >
    Ron Vecchi, Oct 23, 2003
    #5
  6. Another thing you have to think about is the inital uploading of the 20MB
    file. I've never tested it, but I suspect that you'd get some sort of
    timeout when using a <input type="file"> control, unless you increased the
    default asp.net timeout beyond the default.

    Just something to think about.

    Michael

    "Ron Vecchi" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > I'm convinced, although the emails are expected to be large by the client
    > (CAD files and other manufacturing design files). The system is intended

    to
    > allow for these types of files so my client can quote them. But the
    > definate possiblility of over shooting the mailbox limit is still there.
    >
    > Gonna go with the email link.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > "William Armstrong" <> wrote in message
    > news:#2gc##...
    > > Receiving a 20MB email is generally bad news.
    > >
    > > The attachment encoding will increase this size too, so that 20MB will

    > turn
    > > out to be an email in the region of 30MB. That will slow down the mail
    > > servers, and may well fill up your recipient's mailbox, causing their

    > other
    > > incoming mail to bounce.
    > >
    > > That's before you think about people who collect their mail via dial-up.
    > > One of our techs sent an 11MB software update to everyone in the company

    > one
    > > time. That was fine for people who were based in the office, but all

    the
    > > guys on the road were shafted, every time they went to collect their

    mail,
    > > it choked on that attachment.
    > >
    > > Linking to large files is definitely the "polite" way to send them.
    > >
    > > Will.
    > >
    > >
    > > "Ron Vecchi" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Sounds like a good idea, but could you explain why this would be bad.
    > > > The use of this module will be very minimal with low traffic. And will
    > > > likley never see concurrent use.

    > >
    > >

    >
    >



    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.528 / Virus Database: 324 - Release Date: 10/16/2003
    Michael Pearson, Oct 23, 2003
    #6
  7. Ron Vecchi

    Ron Vecchi Guest

    Yes, i've expanded the limit before in a different application to 10mb I
    think in the web.config. SHould be the same for 20

    Thanks


    "Michael Pearson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Another thing you have to think about is the inital uploading of the 20MB
    > file. I've never tested it, but I suspect that you'd get some sort of
    > timeout when using a <input type="file"> control, unless you increased the
    > default asp.net timeout beyond the default.
    >
    > Just something to think about.
    >
    > Michael
    >
    > "Ron Vecchi" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    > > I'm convinced, although the emails are expected to be large by the

    client
    > > (CAD files and other manufacturing design files). The system is

    intended
    > to
    > > allow for these types of files so my client can quote them. But the
    > > definate possiblility of over shooting the mailbox limit is still there.
    > >
    > > Gonna go with the email link.
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > > "William Armstrong" <> wrote in

    message
    > > news:#2gc##...
    > > > Receiving a 20MB email is generally bad news.
    > > >
    > > > The attachment encoding will increase this size too, so that 20MB will

    > > turn
    > > > out to be an email in the region of 30MB. That will slow down the

    mail
    > > > servers, and may well fill up your recipient's mailbox, causing their

    > > other
    > > > incoming mail to bounce.
    > > >
    > > > That's before you think about people who collect their mail via

    dial-up.
    > > > One of our techs sent an 11MB software update to everyone in the

    company
    > > one
    > > > time. That was fine for people who were based in the office, but all

    > the
    > > > guys on the road were shafted, every time they went to collect their

    > mail,
    > > > it choked on that attachment.
    > > >
    > > > Linking to large files is definitely the "polite" way to send them.
    > > >
    > > > Will.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Ron Vecchi" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:...
    > > > > Sounds like a good idea, but could you explain why this would be

    bad.
    > > > > The use of this module will be very minimal with low traffic. And

    will
    > > > > likley never see concurrent use.
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    > ---
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.528 / Virus Database: 324 - Release Date: 10/16/2003
    >
    >
    Ron Vecchi, Oct 23, 2003
    #7
    1. Advertising

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