MATLAB2Python

Discussion in 'Python' started by Sarge, Apr 29, 2004.

  1. Sarge

    Sarge Guest

    Hi, everybody!
    I'm a moderately experienced programmer in Matlab, and looking for a
    free computational language (Matlab is *REALLY* expensive for an
    individual, like me).
    I came across Python (actually Scipy) and immediately felt
    comfortable with the interface and syntax.
    I'm still a newbe, so, before attempting a serious work on it, I'd
    like to hear any opinion about migration from Matlab to Python, and
    also a rough comparison between these two languages.

    Thanx in advance, and excuse me for my very bad English (I'm not a
    native English speaker),

    Sarge
     
    Sarge, Apr 29, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. In article <D2Xjc.28117$>,
    Sarge <> wrote:
    >Hi, everybody!
    >I'm a moderately experienced programmer in Matlab, and looking for a
    >free computational language (Matlab is *REALLY* expensive for an
    >individual, like me).
    >I came across Python (actually Scipy) and immediately felt
    >comfortable with the interface and syntax.
    >I'm still a newbe, so, before attempting a serious work on it, I'd
    >like to hear any opinion about migration from Matlab to Python, and
    >also a rough comparison between these two languages.

    .
    .
    .
    1. I run into quite a few people making a transition
    from Matlab to Python; invariably they say that
    the change is working out better than they expected.
    Very roughly speaking, Python allows for more
    abstraction and expressive power that expands their
    horizons beyond what they achieved with Matlab.
    2. They're different, though, and Matlab certainly
    boasts a massive collection of special-purpose
    add-ons that will take a while to replace. Also,
    for some functions, Matlab is much faster (and for
    others, Python is much faster).
    3. For the most conservative transition, you'll want
    to learn about Octave.

    A reference to Octave and more appear at <URL:
    http://phaseit.net/claird/comp.programming/open_source_science.html >.
    --

    Cameron Laird <>
    Business: http://www.Phaseit.net
     
    Cameron Laird, Apr 29, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Cameron Laird wrote:
    > In article <D2Xjc.28117$>,
    > Sarge <> wrote:
    >
    >>Hi, everybody!
    >>I'm a moderately experienced programmer in Matlab, and looking for a
    >>free computational language (Matlab is *REALLY* expensive for an
    >>individual, like me).
    >>I came across Python (actually Scipy) and immediately felt
    >>comfortable with the interface and syntax.
    >>I'm still a newbe, so, before attempting a serious work on it, I'd
    >>like to hear any opinion about migration from Matlab to Python, and
    >>also a rough comparison between these two languages.

    >
    > .
    > .
    > .
    > 1. I run into quite a few people making a transition
    > from Matlab to Python; invariably they say that
    > the change is working out better than they expected.
    > Very roughly speaking, Python allows for more
    > abstraction and expressive power that expands their
    > horizons beyond what they achieved with Matlab.
    > 2. They're different, though, and Matlab certainly
    > boasts a massive collection of special-purpose
    > add-ons that will take a while to replace. Also,
    > for some functions, Matlab is much faster (and for
    > others, Python is much faster).
    > 3. For the most conservative transition, you'll want
    > to learn about Octave.
    >
    > A reference to Octave and more appear at <URL:
    > http://phaseit.net/claird/comp.programming/open_source_science.html >.


    Also check out numarray and PIL.
     
    Edward C. Jones, Apr 29, 2004
    #3
  4. Sarge

    Nick Carter Guest

    Also look at Matplotlib for Matlab-like plotting:
    http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/

    Nick

    "Edward C. Jones" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Cameron Laird wrote:
    > > In article <D2Xjc.28117$>,
    > > Sarge <> wrote:
    > >
    > >>Hi, everybody!
    > >>I'm a moderately experienced programmer in Matlab, and looking for a
    > >>free computational language (Matlab is *REALLY* expensive for an
    > >>individual, like me).
    > >>I came across Python (actually Scipy) and immediately felt
    > >>comfortable with the interface and syntax.
    > >>I'm still a newbe, so, before attempting a serious work on it, I'd
    > >>like to hear any opinion about migration from Matlab to Python, and
    > >>also a rough comparison between these two languages.

    > >
    > > .
    > > .
    > > .
    > > 1. I run into quite a few people making a transition
    > > from Matlab to Python; invariably they say that
    > > the change is working out better than they expected.
    > > Very roughly speaking, Python allows for more
    > > abstraction and expressive power that expands their
    > > horizons beyond what they achieved with Matlab.
    > > 2. They're different, though, and Matlab certainly
    > > boasts a massive collection of special-purpose
    > > add-ons that will take a while to replace. Also,
    > > for some functions, Matlab is much faster (and for
    > > others, Python is much faster).
    > > 3. For the most conservative transition, you'll want
    > > to learn about Octave.
    > >
    > > A reference to Octave and more appear at <URL:
    > > http://phaseit.net/claird/comp.programming/open_source_science.html >.

    >
    > Also check out numarray and PIL.
     
    Nick Carter, Apr 29, 2004
    #4
  5. Sarge

    John Hunter Guest

    >>>>> "Nick" == Nick Carter <> writes:

    Nick> Also look at Matplotlib for Matlab-like plotting:
    Nick> http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/

    I find python + numeric/numarray + MLAb + scipy + matplotlib to be a
    very workable replacement for matlab, but I'm biased :)

    Actually, I used to work all the time in matlab and wrote some fairly
    complex applications in it. I just sort of hit the wall at some point
    when I was trying to do networking, dbases, complex data structures,
    and so on, in matlab. You *can* do it with the matlab + the built-in
    JVM, but it's not easy, pretty, or fast.

    At some point I found myself doing all my work in python and dumping
    the results to data files for plotting in matlab. Since that is a
    frustrating solution, I bit the bullet and wrote matplotlib, with the
    goal of making plots that look as good as matlab's, and were as easy
    to create.

    Here is a little comparison of a script to generate some white noise,
    convolve it with a low pass filter, and make two plots, one of the
    time series and one of the power spectrum.

    First in matlab

    dt = 0.01;
    t = [0:dt:10];
    nse = randn(size(t));
    r = exp(-t/0.05);
    cnse = conv(nse, r)*dt;
    cnse = cnse(1:length(t));
    s = 0.1*sin(2*pi*t) + cnse;

    figure(1)
    plot(t,s)

    figure(2)
    psd(s, 512, 1/dt)

    And then in matplotlib with a little help from numeric and friends

    from matplotlib.matlab import *

    dt = 0.01
    t = arange(0,10,dt)
    nse = randn(len(t))
    r = exp(-t/0.05)

    cnse = convolve(nse, r, mode=2)*dt
    cnse = cnse[:len(t)]
    s = 0.1*sin(2*pi*t) + cnse

    figure(1)
    plot(t,s)

    figure(2)
    psd(s, 512, 1/dt)

    show()

    Cheers,
    John Hunter
     
    John Hunter, Apr 29, 2004
    #5
  6. Sarge

    Guest

    Sarge <> wrote in message news:<D2Xjc.28117$>...
    > Hi, everybody!
    > I'm a moderately experienced programmer in Matlab, and looking for a
    > free computational language (Matlab is *REALLY* expensive for an
    > individual, like me).


    You should consider the (compiled) F programming language, which is a
    free subset of Fortran 95 -- see http://www.fortran.com/F/index.html.
    F and F95 both have array operations comparable to Matlab. You can get
    a syntax comparison of Matlab and Fortran at
    http://www.owlnet.rice.edu/~mech517/F90_Overview.html . Fortran 95
    compilers are not in general free but much are less expensive than
    Matlab. The Intel Fortran 95 compiler is free on Linux for
    noncommercial use, and the open-source G95 compiler on Linux is usable
    (but not yet mature) -- see http://g95.sourceforge.net/ .

    > I came across Python (actually Scipy) and immediately felt
    > comfortable with the interface and syntax.
    > I'm still a newbe, so, before attempting a serious work on it, I'd
    > like to hear any opinion about migration from Matlab to Python, and
    > also a rough comparison between these two languages.


    I have found numerous cases where Python programs run 10-100 times
    slower or more than a comparable Fortran 95 program. Look up my
    previous posts here. Although both Matlab and Python are scripting
    languages, much more effort has gone into optimizing the former for
    speed. If execution time is more important than scripting convenience,
    I recommend Fortran over Python.

    An indication that Python takes the interests of beginning programmers
    more seriously than those of experienced scientific programmers is
    that integer division is going to be redefined in future versions of
    the language -- 2/3 = 1 now but will equal 1.5 in the future. (I think
    you are supposed to use 2//3). The Fortran standards committee takes
    backwards compatibility much more seriously, so that code you write
    now will not take on a new meaning in future versions of the language.
     
    , Apr 29, 2004
    #6
  7. Sarge

    Peter Hansen Guest

    wrote:

    > The Fortran standards committee takes
    > backwards compatibility much more seriously, so that code you write
    > now will not take on a new meaning in future versions of the language.


    This is an unfair characterization. They most certainly take
    backwards compatibility *seriously*, but perhaps they put a
    higher value on making changes that, in their opinion, make
    significant improvements to the language, or fix serious
    mistakes they made in the original. Maybe that's a reason
    that Python is being adopted more, while FORTRAN growth is, uh,
    somewhat flat.

    I really doubt they sit around in their plush leather chairs,
    stroking their long-haired Persian cats, and saying "But won't
    that break old code? Yes, but screw the scientific programmers,
    BWAHAHAHAHA...."

    But I could be wrong.

    -Peter
     
    Peter Hansen, Apr 29, 2004
    #7
  8. Sarge wrote:
    > Hi, everybody!
    > I'm a moderately experienced programmer in Matlab, and looking for a
    > free computational language (Matlab is *REALLY* expensive for an
    > individual, like me).
    > I came across Python (actually Scipy) and immediately felt
    > comfortable with the interface and syntax.
    > I'm still a newbe, so, before attempting a serious work on it, I'd
    > like to hear any opinion about migration from Matlab to Python, and
    > also a rough comparison between these two languages.
    >
    > Thanx in advance, and excuse me for my very bad English (I'm not a
    > native English speaker),
    >
    > Sarge

    Sarge,

    You might like to take a look at PyMatrix. It is still very much a
    development project, but I would appreciate your thoughts on the areas
    where it is deficient, as compared with MatLab.
    http://www3.sympatico.ca/cjw/PyMatrix

    Colin W.
     
    Colin J. Williams, Apr 29, 2004
    #8
  9. Sarge

    John Hunter Guest

    >>>>> "Colin" == Colin J Williams <> writes:

    Colin> You might like to take a look at PyMatrix. It is still
    Colin> very much a development project, but I would appreciate
    Colin> your thoughts on the areas where it is deficient, as
    Colin> compared with MatLab.
    Colin> http://www3.sympatico.ca/cjw/PyMatrix

    I looked over your site and examples, but didn't see any explanation
    of what PyMatrix provides over the required numarray and all the
    helpful linear algebra and summary functions it provides in
    numarray.linear_algebra and numarray.linear_algebra.mlab. With the
    exception of Hilbert, most of the code seems like a wrapper of
    numarray functionality.

    Is the main difference how you define the default behavior of
    operators? Or is this just a starting point for a much larger
    package?

    Thanks,
    JDH
     
    John Hunter, Apr 29, 2004
    #9
  10. Sarge

    John J. Lee Guest

    Peter Hansen <> writes:

    > wrote:
    >
    > > The Fortran standards committee takes
    > > backwards compatibility much more seriously, so that code you write
    > > now will not take on a new meaning in future versions of the language.

    >
    > This is an unfair characterization. They most certainly take
    > backwards compatibility *seriously*, but perhaps they put a
    > higher value on making changes that, in their opinion, make
    > significant improvements to the language, or fix serious
    > mistakes they made in the original.


    Yeah. I was initially shocked that they'd even consider such a
    change, but I was persuaded that a) it was significantly useful, b) it
    was taken after very careful consideration of what the Right Thing
    was, c) it's not as scary a change as it looks.


    > Maybe that's a reason
    > that Python is being adopted more, while FORTRAN growth is, uh,
    > somewhat flat.

    [...]

    I was going to claim that's a weak point: Fortran growth is flat
    because everyone who could benefit from a fast, numerical
    analysis-friendly compiler is already using Fortran. On reflection,
    though, I guess that's not true: there are a lot of people using
    languages like C++ to write this sort of numerical code. Swapping
    Fortran for C++ certainly seems a questionable decision now: keep the
    Fortran, and add some Python.


    John
     
    John J. Lee, Apr 29, 2004
    #10
  11. > I'm a moderately experienced programmer in Matlab, and looking for a
    > free computational language (Matlab is *REALLY* expensive for an
    > individual, like me).
    > I came across Python (actually Scipy) and immediately felt
    > comfortable with the interface and syntax.


    May be SciLab ? It's not Python, it's free Mathlab-compatible pakage.
    http://scilabsoft.inria.fr/
     
    Alex Yakovlev, Apr 29, 2004
    #11
  12. Sarge

    Sarge Guest

    > I have found numerous cases where Python programs run 10-100
    > times slower or more than a comparable Fortran 95 program.


    Uh-oh. This is not fine.
    I want to switch to py in order to achieve more flexibility
    especially in the areas of GUIs, distributed computing, and oo-
    programming. But I don't want my programs run 100 times slower!
    Is it possible to integrate some fortran compiled routines in order
    to speed up the more time-consuming steps?

    Thanx,
    Sarge

    P.S. I have already tried Fortran95 for a while, but I found it's a
    very old-fashioned language, more than Matlab itself, I didn't like
    it very much.
     
    Sarge, Apr 29, 2004
    #12
  13. Sarge

    Sarge Guest

    Il 29 apr 2004, John Hunter ha scritto:

    > I find python + numeric/numarray + MLAb + scipy + matplotlib to
    > be a very workable replacement for matlab,


    [cut]

    I'm impressed. Especially I liked the scipts, awesome!

    Please help me a little more, would you?

    Now, I work on WindosXP and on MDK Linux, I have found on the
    Internet and downloaded all the packages you were talking about:
    python, numeric, MLAb, scipy, matplotlib, but I can't figure out in
    which order (and where) I have to install them. I don't want to mess
    things up, because the Windoze box is at work and I have to ask for
    administrator priviledges in order to install/uninstall.

    Thanx,
    Sarge
     
    Sarge, Apr 29, 2004
    #13
  14. Sarge

    Robert Kern Guest

    Sarge wrote:

    > Il 29 apr 2004, John Hunter ha scritto:
    >
    >
    >>I find python + numeric/numarray + MLAb + scipy + matplotlib to
    >>be a very workable replacement for matlab,

    >
    >
    > [cut]
    >
    > I'm impressed. Especially I liked the scipts, awesome!
    >
    > Please help me a little more, would you?
    >
    > Now, I work on WindosXP and on MDK Linux, I have found on the
    > Internet and downloaded all the packages you were talking about:
    > python, numeric, MLAb, scipy, matplotlib, but I can't figure out in
    > which order (and where) I have to install them. I don't want to mess
    > things up, because the Windoze box is at work and I have to ask for
    > administrator priviledges in order to install/uninstall.


    Do you mind a hefty download? If not, then try Enthought's distribution
    of Python[1]. matplotlib seems to have an exe installer for Windows, so
    I assume it's straightforward.

    But, in short, that order is correct (the last three all depend on Numeric).

    [1] http://www.enthought.com/python/

    > Thanx,
    > Sarge


    --
    Robert Kern


    "In the fields of hell where the grass grows high
    Are the graves of dreams allowed to die."
    -- Richard Harter
     
    Robert Kern, Apr 29, 2004
    #14
  15. Sarge

    Robert Kern Guest

    Sarge wrote:

    >>I have found numerous cases where Python programs run 10-100
    >>times slower or more than a comparable Fortran 95 program.

    >
    >
    > Uh-oh. This is not fine.
    > I want to switch to py in order to achieve more flexibility
    > especially in the areas of GUIs, distributed computing, and oo-
    > programming. But I don't want my programs run 100 times slower!
    > Is it possible to integrate some fortran compiled routines in order
    > to speed up the more time-consuming steps?


    Why, yes! http://cens.ioc.ee/projects/f2py2e/

    In my experience, the 10-100 factor only arises when you are doing all
    the looping in Python. If you can utilize Numeric arrays sufficiently,
    most of the looping goes down into fast C. So be wary of premature
    optimization: sometimes the Python code will run just as fast or fast
    enough (or faster!) than calling out to FORTRAN or C or C++.

    > Thanx,
    > Sarge
    >
    > P.S. I have already tried Fortran95 for a while, but I found it's a
    > very old-fashioned language, more than Matlab itself, I didn't like
    > it very much.


    --
    Robert Kern


    "In the fields of hell where the grass grows high
    Are the graves of dreams allowed to die."
    -- Richard Harter
     
    Robert Kern, Apr 29, 2004
    #15
  16. Sarge

    John Hunter Guest

    >>>>> "Robert" == Robert Kern <> writes:

    Robert> Do you mind a hefty download? If not, then try Enthought's
    Robert> distribution of Python[1]. matplotlib seems to have an exe
    Robert> installer for Windows, so I assume it's straightforward.

    Robert> But, in short, that order is correct (the last three all
    Robert> depend on Numeric).

    Robert> [1] http://www.enthought.com/python/

    Seconded - that is what I recommend on the matplotlib web site for
    windows users - enthought then matplotlib. See the windows section on
    http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/installing.html. enthought will
    give you numeric and scipy (and VTK which is awesome for 3D) and
    almost all of matplotlib will work out of the box with enthought on
    windows.

    matplotlib supports different GUI environments. On windows tkagg or
    wxagg are the natural choices and they come with enthought. On a
    modern linux box, gtkagg is a natural choice, but may require you to
    upgrade your pygtk (grkagg also runs great on windows but require a
    couple of extra packages). Switching between backends on different
    platforms is mainly seamless - your matplotlib scripts are unchanged
    and the navigation controls are the same. The choice is made in a
    configuration file
    http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/faq.html#MATPLOTLIBRC See
    http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/backends.html and
    http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/faq.html#WHICHBACKEND for details.

    As for install order on linux, something like

    python2.2 or later
    a python GUI (wxpython, tkinter, or pygtk)
    numeric or numarray
    scipy (optional)
    matplotlib # set the numerix var to reflect your numarray/numpy choice

    matplotlib provides a numeric/numarray compatibility interface
    (written by Todd Miller, one of lead numarray developers) so you can
    work with either numeric or numarray transparently. Be forewarned
    that scipy uses numeric so you may want to go with this if you plan on
    using scipy heavily.

    JDH
     
    John Hunter, Apr 29, 2004
    #16
  17. Sarge

    John J. Lee Guest

    Sarge <> writes:

    > > I have found numerous cases where Python programs run 10-100
    > > times slower or more than a comparable Fortran 95 program.

    >
    > Uh-oh. This is not fine.
    > I want to switch to py in order to achieve more flexibility
    > especially in the areas of GUIs, distributed computing, and oo-
    > programming. But I don't want my programs run 100 times slower!


    Don't mean to sound grumpy, but anybody who takes a bald statement
    like that you quote above as meaningful, without thinking about what
    it means, deserves what they get.


    > Is it possible to integrate some fortran compiled routines in order
    > to speed up the more time-consuming steps?


    Who doesn't, in this field?

    Despite the fact that one often writes more lines of Python code than
    of Fortran / C / C++, many apps that do this kind of work can be
    regarded, for the purposes of CPU-efficiency, to be a bunch of Fortran
    / C / C++ code being driven by Python. The idea is that you do the
    heavy lifting with Fortran, wrap it (as SciPy does, for example), and
    then solve your problem using Python, thus getting the best of both
    worlds. Exactly what you need to wrap to achieve acceptable
    performance, is a "how long is a piece of string" question, which is
    why the quote about '10-100' times is close to meaningless if
    unqualified.

    Lots of people have heavy numerical applications that they've written
    mostly in Python. This state of affairs is thanks to the work of many
    clever people who've written good Fortran libraries and compilers, of
    course. And maybe you'll be unlucky and have to write a relatively
    large amount of code in Fortran. Who cares? Are you going to write
    *everything* in Fortran and work twice as hard as a result? Maybe, if
    you really care as much about performance as most people mistakenly
    think they do <wink>.


    > P.S. I have already tried Fortran95 for a while, but I found it's a
    > very old-fashioned language, more than Matlab itself, I didn't like
    > it very much.


    Good luck <wink>


    John
     
    John J. Lee, Apr 29, 2004
    #17
  18. Sarge

    Guest

    Sarge <> wrote in message news:<D2Xjc.28117$>...
    > Hi, everybody!
    > I'm a moderately experienced programmer in Matlab, and looking for a
    > free computational language (Matlab is *REALLY* expensive for an
    > individual, like me).
    > I came across Python (actually Scipy) and immediately felt
    > comfortable with the interface and syntax.
    > I'm still a newbe, so, before attempting a serious work on it, I'd
    > like to hear any opinion about migration from Matlab to Python, and
    > also a rough comparison between these two languages.
    >
    > Thanx in advance, and excuse me for my very bad English (I'm not a
    > native English speaker),
    >
    > Sarge


    In both Matlab and Fortran arrays indices start with 1 (at least by
    default), and x(3:5) references elements x(3),x(4),x(5), whereas in
    Python arrays start with 0 and x[3:5] = [x[3],x[4]] -- the element
    corresponding to the upper bound is not included in the slice. That is
    one issue to watch for.
     
    , Apr 30, 2004
    #18
  19. John Hunter wrote:

    >>>>>>"Colin" == Colin J Williams <> writes:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>

    >
    > Colin> You might like to take a look at PyMatrix. It is still
    > Colin> very much a development project, but I would appreciate
    > Colin> your thoughts on the areas where it is deficient, as
    > Colin> compared with MatLab.
    > Colin> http://www3.sympatico.ca/cjw/PyMatrix
    >
    >I looked over your site and examples, but didn't see any explanation
    >of what PyMatrix provides over the required numarray
    >

    You are right, the documentation needs improving.

    The following is illustrative of matrix usage:
    # tRegrn.py To use linear regresssion to illustrate matrix usage
    # Note: PyMatrix provides a function to handle this sort of thing
    import PyMatrix.matrix as m

    # Suppose we have A*x= b, where A (a matrix) and b (a column vector) are
    observed and we wish to
    # obtain a least squares estimate of x.

    # To illustrate we generate a test case:
    x= m.M([1, 2, 3], type= m._nt.Float64).T
    A= m.random(shape= (10, 3))
    error= (m.random(shape= (10, 1)) - 0.5)/10 # ie. -0.05 .. 0.05
    b= A * x + error
    # solution
    xEst= (A.T * A).I * A.T * b
    print 'xEstimate:', xEst

    >and all the
    >helpful linear algebra and summary functions it provides in
    >numarray.linear_algebra and numarray.linear_algebra.mlab. With the
    >exception of Hilbert, most of the code seems like a wrapper of
    >numarray functionality.
    >

    There are a few other functions and methods, but the documentation makes
    it clear that PyMatrix is based on numarray, in fact M (the main matrix
    class) is a a sub-class of NumArray.

    Why based on numarray, rather than numeric? Because, at the time the
    project was started, numarray seemed to be set to replace numeric.

    For a full list, see:
    http://www3.sympatico.ca/cjw/PyMatrix/Doc/PackageEntry.html

    >Is the main difference how you define the default behavior of
    >operators?
    >

    The main differences are:
    - PyMatrix is focused on two dimensional numeric structures,
    row and column vectors are handled as matrices.
    - It permits matrix arithmetic, for compatible matrices A
    and B and integer n, the matrix operations A+B, A-B, A*B,
    A/B and A**n are recognized.
    - It uses properties to provide basic matrix operations such as:
    I Inverse
    T Transpose
    EValues Eigenvalues
    SVD Singular Value Decomposition
    Det Determinant
    - It provides a method to build sub-matrices into a larger
    matrix
    - It provides methods to aggregate data by row or column

    >Or is this just a starting point for a much larger
    >package?
    >
    >

    No, quantiles are likely to be added soon and possibly symmetric
    matrices, although it is not clear that the potential storage saving
    justifies the additional processing. I am certainly not seeking the
    bulk of SciPy.

    c.l.p has a number of postings similar to "MATLAB2Python" from Sarge,
    see below. If something like Huaiyu Zhu's MatPy were available then, it
    seems to me, it could be of help to the Python user who works with matrices.

    Colin W.

    >Thanks,
    >JDH
    >
    >


    Hi, everybody!
    I'm a moderately experienced programmer in Matlab, and looking for a
    free computational language (Matlab is *REALLY* expensive for an
    individual, like me).
    I came across Python (actually Scipy) and immediately felt
    comfortable with the interface and syntax.
    I'm still a newbe, so, before attempting a serious work on it, I'd
    like to hear any opinion about migration from Matlab to Python, and
    also a rough comparison between these two languages.

    Thanx in advance, and excuse me for my very bad English (I'm not a
    native English speaker),

    Sarge
     
    Colin J. Williams, Apr 30, 2004
    #19
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