max data transfer possible for a single HTTP request !!

Discussion in 'Java' started by Jag, Jul 17, 2004.

  1. Jag

    Jag Guest

    hi,

    am having a situation of transferring huge amount of data over HTTP i.e
    (ejb-jsp). i was wondering is there any max limit for the amount of kb that
    can be transferred.

    my sql select may yield upto 5mb of data at certain situations.

    thanx
    j
    Jag, Jul 17, 2004
    #1
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  2. Jag

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 17:02:51 +1200, "Jag" <> wrote or
    quoted :

    >am having a situation of transferring huge amount of data over HTTP i.e


    you have downloaded the JDK with HTTP. It runs about 35 MB. HTTP
    protocol looks after it. If you read at the raw socket level, you
    must be aware that HTTP sends in long counted blocks within the TCP/IP
    packetstream.

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
    Roedy Green, Jul 17, 2004
    #2
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  3. Jag

    Nigel Wade Guest

    On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 17:02:51 +1200, Jag wrote:

    > hi,
    >
    > am having a situation of transferring huge amount of data over HTTP i.e
    > (ejb-jsp). i was wondering is there any max limit for the amount of kb that
    > can be transferred.
    >
    > my sql select may yield upto 5mb of data at certain situations.
    >
    > thanx
    > j


    It depends on the OS underlying the Web server, the Web server itself,
    and the client. If any part is built for 32bit file access then the limit
    is 2GB.

    I ran into this trying to download the Fedora Core 2 DVD iso which
    is over 3GB. I did eventually get a server/client combination which
    allowed the download.

    --
    Nigel Wade, System Administrator, Space Plasma Physics Group,
    University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH, UK
    E-mail :
    Phone : +44 (0)116 2523548, Fax : +44 (0)116 2523555
    Nigel Wade, Jul 19, 2004
    #3
  4. Jag

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Mon, 19 Jul 2004 17:14:56 +0100, Nigel Wade <>
    wrote or quoted :

    >It depends on the OS underlying the Web server, the Web server itself,
    >and the client. If any part is built for 32bit file access then the limit
    >is 2GB.


    In practice this mean avoiding Win98. what others?

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
    Roedy Green, Jul 19, 2004
    #4
  5. Jag

    Nigel Wade Guest

    On Mon, 19 Jul 2004 19:02:05 +0000, Roedy Green wrote:

    > On Mon, 19 Jul 2004 17:14:56 +0100, Nigel Wade <>
    > wrote or quoted :
    >
    >>It depends on the OS underlying the Web server, the Web server itself,
    >>and the client. If any part is built for 32bit file access then the limit
    >>is 2GB.

    >
    > In practice this mean avoiding Win98. what others?


    I think IE on XP failed. wget on Linux (Fedora Core 1 and 2) failed.

    It's difficult to know whether the server of the client is responsible.
    It's not something you test too often, as the failure will not take place
    until several hours have gone by. The problem of the 2GB limit of wget is
    documented and being fixed, apparently it's not a simple case of
    re-building with largefile support.

    --
    Nigel Wade, System Administrator, Space Plasma Physics Group,
    University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH, UK
    E-mail :
    Phone : +44 (0)116 2523548, Fax : +44 (0)116 2523555
    Nigel Wade, Jul 20, 2004
    #5
  6. Jag

    ~ryan upton Guest

    "Jag" <> wrote in message news:<dq2Kc.8804$>...
    > hi,
    >
    > am having a situation of transferring huge amount of data over HTTP i.e
    > (ejb-jsp). i was wondering is there any max limit for the amount of kb that
    > can be transferred.
    >
    > my sql select may yield upto 5mb of data at certain situations.
    >
    > thanx
    > j



    If I may offer a different perspective and some adivce, I think the
    more appropriate question is why would you want to send a whole <=5M
    of data down the pipe. Thinking from the end-user perspective
    vis-a-vis interface and performance I would hate to wait for that data
    to come back to me. Even if I have high throughput I would most
    certainly hate to sift through all that data once I received it, not
    to mention the fact the interface is probably going to be horrid. You
    may want to focus less on transfer limits and more on design. I would
    recommed checking out J2EE Design Patterns. The Value List Handler is
    practically screaming to be used here ;-)

    http://java.sun.com/blueprints/corej2eepatterns/Patterns/ValueListHandler.html

    HTH
    ~RU
    ~ryan upton, Jul 20, 2004
    #6
  7. Jag

    Grant Wagner Guest

    Roedy Green wrote:

    > On Mon, 19 Jul 2004 17:14:56 +0100, Nigel Wade <>
    > wrote or quoted :
    >
    > >It depends on the OS underlying the Web server, the Web server itself,
    > >and the client. If any part is built for 32bit file access then the limit
    > >is 2GB.

    >
    > In practice this mean avoiding Win98. what others?


    It doesn't mean avoiding Windows 98 because it doesn't support files that
    large (although there are lots of other reasons to).

    If you are using Windows 98 on any sort of modern hardware, you're presumably
    using FAT32. FAT32 supports files almost 4GB in size, not 2GB.

    You might be thinking about the FAT16 partition size limitation (2GB), but if
    you are running Windows 98 on a HD using FAT16, then you can't download a file
    larger then 2GB anyway, you don't have enough disk space. Although,
    interestingly enough, FAT16 supports files almost 4GB in size, even though
    with the largest possible Windows 98 supported cluster size, you can't make a
    partition that large. You _can_ make a 4GB FAT16 partition in Windows NT 4.0
    by using a non-Windows 98 standard of a 64KB cluster.

    NTFS has theoretical support for files of size 16 exabytes minus 1 KB and an
    implementation limit of 16 terabytes minus 64 KB. Nothing to worry about
    there... for now at least the next few years.

    Information obtained at: <url:
    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/prkc_fil_tdrn.asp
    />

    As an aside, I can imagine it now. In 100 years someone will make a post to
    slashdot.org saying "Bill Gates was an idiot! He once said 'no one is ever
    going to need files bigger then 16 terrabytes minus 64KB'!" :)

    --
    Grant Wagner <>
    Grant Wagner, Jul 21, 2004
    #7
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