Meaning of time-taken value for ASP pages in w3c format log files

Discussion in 'ASP General' started by Simon Wadsworth, Nov 8, 2004.

  1. My application uses VB6 WebClasses to handle the UI, so all requests come in
    via a stub ASP page.

    I would like to know the time taken for the request to be processed. I am
    trying to use the time-taken value in the IIS log files by I am unclear as to
    the precise meaning of the value recorded.

    Using a test WebClass on a development PC (Win2K Pro/SP4) the value recorded
    in the IIS log files seems to vary:

    1. If Response.Buffer=True, then the time recorded is the amount of time
    spent in the WebClass call.

    2. If Response.Buffer=False, then the time recorded is the amount of time
    spent in the WebClass call PLUS the amount of time required to send the
    response data to the client browser.

    However, on our production servers the Response.Buffer=True is always used
    but the times recorded seen to indicate that they include the data transfer
    time as well. i.e. low bandwith client accesses have a larger time-taken than
    local LAN users for an equivalent volume of data.

    Additionally, I was my understanding that when Buffering was used with an
    ASP page the sc-bytes value was not recorded. Again, on the production server
    this value IS being recorded and seems accurate.

    The production servers are W2K AS/SP4 using HTTPS, Basic Authentication and
    Certificates.

    Does anyone have any definitive information on this?

    Many Thanks
    Simon Wadsworth, Nov 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. If memory serves the time-taken is the total time, including transfer, as
    you said. This isn't meant really for performance troubleshooting of your
    pages.

    You can use a third party component like asptime to grab the server time
    before/after your code and either record it to ram, or record it to a
    database somewhere.

    Depending on what you are doing exactly you could even get time taken and
    return it to the client to say how long their request took (you don't have
    to display it, but you could return it so you can enable debugging on the
    client to show it).

    One component for asp is asptime which is free and stable -
    http://www.kamath.com/downloads/default.asp?DLOAD=2 - That's no relation to
    me nor BitShop, but we've used it a few times.

    Steve Radich - Hosting, Colocation, Troubleshooting IIS, NT, Exchange, etc.
    BitShop, Inc. - http://www.bitshop.com - IIS Experts since 1996

    "Simon Wadsworth" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > My application uses VB6 WebClasses to handle the UI, so all requests come
    > in
    > via a stub ASP page.
    >
    > I would like to know the time taken for the request to be processed. I am
    > trying to use the time-taken value in the IIS log files by I am unclear as
    > to
    > the precise meaning of the value recorded.
    >
    > Using a test WebClass on a development PC (Win2K Pro/SP4) the value
    > recorded
    > in the IIS log files seems to vary:
    >
    > 1. If Response.Buffer=True, then the time recorded is the amount of time
    > spent in the WebClass call.
    >
    > 2. If Response.Buffer=False, then the time recorded is the amount of time
    > spent in the WebClass call PLUS the amount of time required to send the
    > response data to the client browser.
    >
    > However, on our production servers the Response.Buffer=True is always used
    > but the times recorded seen to indicate that they include the data
    > transfer
    > time as well. i.e. low bandwith client accesses have a larger time-taken
    > than
    > local LAN users for an equivalent volume of data.
    >
    > Additionally, I was my understanding that when Buffering was used with an
    > ASP page the sc-bytes value was not recorded. Again, on the production
    > server
    > this value IS being recorded and seems accurate.
    >
    > The production servers are W2K AS/SP4 using HTTPS, Basic Authentication
    > and
    > Certificates.
    >
    > Does anyone have any definitive information on this?
    >
    > Many Thanks
    Steve Radich \(BitShop, Inc.\), Nov 10, 2004
    #2
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