Method invocation via proxy and reflection

Discussion in 'Java' started by Stefan Ram, Oct 1, 2007.

  1. Stefan Ram

    Stefan Ram Guest

    A proxy object can implement any interface and then delegate
    calls to anywhere.

    I was able to use this once, but now I got a strange behavior
    with Java 1.6 and java.lang.CharSequence.

    One can see below that within the method »invoke«, the method
    is being »redirected« to the method »Base#length()«. Therefore,
    the program should print »363«.
    This new invocation target is even printed (see »### HERE ###«
    in the source code below).

    But actually »Base#dummy0()« is called. (The output
    of the program is given at the very end.)
    I might have made some mistake. But in this case, I would
    expect an exception or an error. Instead silently the wrong
    method »Base#dummy0()« is called. Why?

    class Util
    {
    /** Return the field "clazz" of the class java.lang.reflect.Method.
    @return the field "clazz" of the class java.lang.reflect.Method */
    static java.lang.reflect.Field methodClassField()
    { final java.lang.reflect.Field fields[] =
    java.lang.reflect.Method.class.getDeclaredFields();
    for( int i = 0; i < fields.length; ++i )
    { if( fields[ i ].getName().equals( "clazz" ))
    return fields[ i ]; }
    throw new java.lang.RuntimeException
    ( "Can't find field \"clazz\" of class \"java.lang.reflect.Method\"." ); }}

    /** Delegate class */
    class Delegate
    { public int dummy0(){ return 147; }
    public int dummy1(){ return 266; }
    public int length(){ return 363; }
    public int dummy3(){ return 473; }
    public int dummy4(){ return 557; }}

    class InvocationHandler0 implements java.lang.reflect.InvocationHandler
    { final private Delegate delegate;
    java.lang.reflect.Field classField = Util.methodClassField();

    public InvocationHandler0( final Delegate delegate )
    { this.delegate = delegate;
    this.classField.setAccessible( true ); }

    /** redirect call to delegate object */
    public java.lang.Object invoke
    ( final java.lang.Object proxy,
    final java.lang.reflect.Method method,
    final java.lang.Object[] args )
    throws java.lang.Throwable
    { java.lang.System.out.println( method ); // java.lang.CharSequence.length()
    classField.set( method, this.delegate.getClass() );
    java.lang.System.out.println( method ); // Base.length() ### HERE ###
    return method.invoke( delegate, args ); }}

    class Main
    { public static void main( final java.lang.String[] _ )
    {
    /* create and use a proxy »v« to handle CharSequence-calls */
    final Delegate delegate = new Delegate();
    java.lang.ClassLoader cl = java.lang.CharSequence.class.getClassLoader();
    java.lang.CharSequence v =
    ( java.lang.CharSequence )java.lang.reflect.Proxy.newProxyInstance
    ( cl, new Class[]{ java.lang.CharSequence.class },
    new InvocationHandler0( delegate ));

    java.lang.System.out.println( v.length() ); }}

    /* The output is:

    public abstract int java.lang.CharSequence.length()
    public abstract int Delegate.length()
    147

    */
     
    Stefan Ram, Oct 1, 2007
    #1
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  2. Stefan Ram

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    On Oct 1, 3:00 pm, -berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:
    > A proxy object can implement any interface and then delegate
    > calls to anywhere.
    >
    > I was able to use this once, but now I got a strange behavior
    > with Java 1.6 and java.lang.CharSequence.
    >
    > One can see below that within the method »invoke«, the method
    > is being »redirected« to the method »Base#length()«. Therefore,
    > the program should print »363«.
    > This new invocation target is even printed (see »### HERE ###«
    > in the source code below).
    >
    > But actually »Base#dummy0()« is called. (The output
    > of the program is given at the very end.)
    > I might have made some mistake. But in this case, I would
    > expect an exception or an error. Instead silently the wrong
    > method »Base#dummy0()« is called. Why?
    >
    > class Util
    > {
    > /** Return the field "clazz" of the class java.lang.reflect.Method.
    > @return the field "clazz" of the class java.lang.reflect.Method */
    > static java.lang.reflect.Field methodClassField()
    > { final java.lang.reflect.Field fields[] =
    > java.lang.reflect.Method.class.getDeclaredFields();
    > for( int i = 0; i < fields.length; ++i )
    > { if( fields[ i ].getName().equals( "clazz" ))
    > return fields[ i ]; }
    > throw new java.lang.RuntimeException
    > ( "Can't find field \"clazz\" of class \"java.lang.reflect.Method\"." ); }}
    >
    > /** Delegate class */
    > class Delegate
    > { public int dummy0(){ return 147; }
    > public int dummy1(){ return 266; }
    > public int length(){ return 363; }
    > public int dummy3(){ return 473; }
    > public int dummy4(){ return 557; }}
    >
    > class InvocationHandler0 implements java.lang.reflect.InvocationHandler
    > { final private Delegate delegate;
    > java.lang.reflect.Field classField = Util.methodClassField();
    >
    > public InvocationHandler0( final Delegate delegate )
    > { this.delegate = delegate;
    > this.classField.setAccessible( true ); }
    >
    > /** redirect call to delegate object */
    > public java.lang.Object invoke
    > ( final java.lang.Object proxy,
    > final java.lang.reflect.Method method,
    > final java.lang.Object[] args )
    > throws java.lang.Throwable
    > { java.lang.System.out.println( method ); // java.lang.CharSequence.length()
    > classField.set( method, this.delegate.getClass() );
    > java.lang.System.out.println( method ); // Base.length() ### HERE ###
    > return method.invoke( delegate, args ); }}
    >
    > class Main
    > { public static void main( final java.lang.String[] _ )
    > {
    > /* create and use a proxy »v« to handle CharSequence-calls */
    > final Delegate delegate = new Delegate();
    > java.lang.ClassLoader cl = java.lang.CharSequence.class.getClassLoader();
    > java.lang.CharSequence v =
    > ( java.lang.CharSequence )java.lang.reflect.Proxy.newProxyInstance
    > ( cl, new Class[]{ java.lang.CharSequence.class },
    > new InvocationHandler0( delegate ));
    >
    > java.lang.System.out.println( v.length() ); }}
    >
    > /* The output is:
    >
    > public abstract int java.lang.CharSequence.length()
    > public abstract int Delegate.length()
    > 147
    >
    > */



    I have to run, but I think the problem is that Delegate doesn't
    implement CharSequence, so calling the CharSequence.length() on the
    delegate is undefined behavior. You need to intercept the method
    name, and act accordingly.
     
    Daniel Pitts, Oct 1, 2007
    #2
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  3. Stefan Ram

    Piotr Kobzda Guest

    Stefan Ram wrote:

    > I might have made some mistake. But in this case, I would
    > expect an exception or an error. Instead silently the wrong
    > method »Base#dummy0()« is called. Why?


    Because you are trying to cheat Java doing something which is not
    normally allowed -- i.e. change private data of a Method. It succeeds
    because there is no security manager active, but run it with even
    default SM (-Djava.security.manager) and you'll see an exception.

    The result "147" is because Java usually optimizes method invocations.
    It just happened that length() is declared as first method in
    CharSequence, so instead of expected invocation of length() in Delegate,
    Java just invokes a first method from it.

    One solution to what you are trying to achieve is already mentioned by
    Daniel -- implement CharSequence by Delegate and call it directly with a
    Method passed to invoke().

    Another solution is to use a Map<Method, Method> (most likely HashMap)
    for mappings of source CharSequence methods into Delegate methods.

    Alternatively you may generate "bridge" methods using e.g. ASM, or cglib.


    piotr
     
    Piotr Kobzda, Oct 1, 2007
    #3
  4. Stefan Ram

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    On Oct 1, 3:48 pm, Piotr Kobzda <> wrote:
    > Stefan Ram wrote:
    > > I might have made some mistake. But in this case, I would
    > > expect an exception or an error. Instead silently the wrong
    > > method »Base#dummy0()« is called. Why?

    >
    > Because you are trying to cheat Java doing something which is not
    > normally allowed -- i.e. change private data of a Method. It succeeds
    > because there is no security manager active, but run it with even
    > default SM (-Djava.security.manager) and you'll see an exception.
    >
    > The result "147" is because Java usually optimizes method invocations.
    > It just happened that length() is declared as first method in
    > CharSequence, so instead of expected invocation of length() in Delegate,
    > Java just invokes a first method from it.
    >
    > One solution to what you are trying to achieve is already mentioned by
    > Daniel -- implement CharSequence by Delegate and call it directly with a
    > Method passed to invoke().
    >
    > Another solution is to use a Map<Method, Method> (most likely HashMap)
    > for mappings of source CharSequence methods into Delegate methods.
    >
    > Alternatively you may generate "bridge" methods using e.g. ASM, or cglib.
    >
    > piotr


    Yet another, probably most appropriate, solution is to implement
    CharSequence and delegate manually.

    Proxy is use most useful for doing things between the calling code and
    the called code, or deciding on targets (that already implement the
    interfaces) after the call. I've used it to dispatch calls to a list
    of targets, such as Listeners. In general, Proxy is a sophisticated
    reflection tool, and should be avoided unless you have an excellent
    reason to use it ;-)
     
    Daniel Pitts, Oct 2, 2007
    #4
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