Microsoft lessening commitment to IronPython and IronRuby

Discussion in 'Python' started by Neil Hodgson, Aug 7, 2010.

  1. Neil Hodgson

    Neil Hodgson Guest

    Neil Hodgson, Aug 7, 2010
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 8, 2010
    #2
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  3. In message <>, Tim Roberts wrote:

    > The .NET Common Language Runtime is a vast and very useful class library,
    > including two complete GUI systems.


    Used only by corporate code-cutter drones.

    Go on, name one creative thing which was ever done in Dotnet.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 10, 2010
    #3
  4. Lawrence D'Oliveiro, 10.08.2010 08:42:
    > In message<>, Tim Roberts wrote:
    >
    >> The .NET Common Language Runtime is a vast and very useful class library,
    >> including two complete GUI systems.

    >
    > Used only by corporate code-cutter drones.
    >
    > Go on, name one creative thing which was ever done in Dotnet.


    Erm, this is Microsoft. It's not about being creative, it's about selling
    stuff to users.

    Stefan
    Stefan Behnel, Aug 10, 2010
    #4
  5. On Tue, 10 Aug 2010 18:42:35 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > In message <>, Tim Roberts
    > wrote:
    >
    >> The .NET Common Language Runtime is a vast and very useful class
    >> library, including two complete GUI systems.

    >
    > Used only by corporate code-cutter drones.
    >
    > Go on, name one creative thing which was ever done in Dotnet.


    Not just Dotnet, but Python on Dotnet.


    http://www.python.org/about/success/resolver/
    http://blog.jonudell.net/2007/09/27/first-look-at-resolver-an-ironpython-based-spreadsheet/




    --
    Steven
    Steven D'Aprano, Aug 10, 2010
    #5
  6. Tim Roberts wrote:

    > I'm not sure that's really fair. The .NET Common Language Runtime is a
    > vast and very useful class library, including two complete GUI systems. The
    > thought was that IronPython and IronRuby would let people who were
    > comfortable in those languages tap into the CLR.


    Is there any way for a non-.NET program to access a .NET library?
    Or is it necessary to drink the entire bottle of .NET kool-aid?

    --
    Greg
    Gregory Ewing, Aug 10, 2010
    #6
  7. On Tue, 10 Aug 2010 20:07:06 +1200, Gregory Ewing wrote:

    > Tim Roberts wrote:
    >
    >> I'm not sure that's really fair. The .NET Common Language Runtime is a
    >> vast and very useful class library, including two complete GUI systems.
    >> The thought was that IronPython and IronRuby would let people who were
    >> comfortable in those languages tap into the CLR.

    >
    > Is there any way for a non-.NET program to access a .NET library? Or is
    > it necessary to drink the entire bottle of .NET kool-aid?



    http://www.mono-project.com/Main_Page



    --
    Steven
    Steven D'Aprano, Aug 10, 2010
    #7
  8. Steven D'Aprano, 10.08.2010 10:04:
    > On Tue, 10 Aug 2010 18:42:35 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >> Go on, name one creative thing which was ever done in Dotnet.

    >
    > Not just Dotnet, but Python on Dotnet.
    >
    > http://www.python.org/about/success/resolver/


    At the very end of that article, I found this statement:

    "Resolver One is Windows only"

    This sounds like a major drawback to me. It might be an acceptable "early
    project priority" if the app is only targeting the desktop, but this system
    additionally claims to be a "web-accessible spreadsheet". If this is
    supposed to run on a server, it means that it will always suffer from the
    "headless click-here-to-continue" problem.

    It might not be too hard to port the app to Mono, but the rather explicit
    claim above doesn't make me feel very comfortable about that upgrade path...

    Stefan
    Stefan Behnel, Aug 10, 2010
    #8
  9. On 08/10/2010 02:07 AM, Gregory Ewing wrote:
    > Tim Roberts wrote:
    >
    >> I'm not sure that's really fair. The .NET Common Language Runtime is a
    >> vast and very useful class library, including two complete GUI systems. The
    >> thought was that IronPython and IronRuby would let people who were
    >> comfortable in those languages tap into the CLR.

    >
    > Is there any way for a non-.NET program to access a .NET library?
    > Or is it necessary to drink the entire bottle of .NET kool-aid?


    Well the only way for a non-.net program to access a .NET library is to
    either embed .NET or use some kind of bridge via RPC.

    So basically, the answer is "no." You pretty much have to embrace .NET
    or not use it.
    Michael Torrie, Aug 10, 2010
    #9
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