Modules/packages by GvR?

Discussion in 'Python' started by gb345, Aug 28, 2009.

  1. gb345

    gb345 Guest

    Are there any Python-only modules or packages in the latest releases
    of Python 2.x or Python 3.x that were largely written by Guido van
    Rossum? What's the best way to find this out? I know that some
    modules mention the author(s) in the source code, but this does
    not seem to be true most of the time, as far as I can tell.

    I'm interested in reading this code as prime examplars of "Pythonicity".
    (I'm sure that many other programmers could serve as models of the
    Pythonic ideal, but I doubt that there would be a *less debatable*
    choice in this category than GvR.)

    Many thanks in advance,

    Gabe
     
    gb345, Aug 28, 2009
    #1
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  2. gb345

    Matimus Guest

    On Aug 28, 7:58 am, gb345 <> wrote:
    > Are there any Python-only modules or packages in the latest releases
    > of Python 2.x or Python 3.x that were largely written by Guido van
    > Rossum?  What's the best way to find this out?  I know that some
    > modules mention the author(s) in the source code, but this does
    > not seem to be true most of the time, as far as I can tell.
    >
    > I'm interested in reading this code as prime examplars of "Pythonicity".
    > (I'm sure that many other programmers could serve as models of the
    > Pythonic ideal, but I doubt that there would be a *less debatable*
    > choice in this category than GvR.)
    >
    > Many thanks in advance,
    >
    > Gabe


    I'm sure there are. You might be able to figure that out by browsing
    the source repository: http://hg.python.org. But, I wouldn't
    necessarily say that any code written by Guido would make a good
    example of 'Pythonic' code. Not that he doesn't create good code, but
    the language and standards have evolved over time. There may be code
    that he wrote from the 2.0 days that may have been perfectly
    'Pythonic' then but is just out-of-date now.

    In general though, browsing the standard modules is a good way to find
    examples, no matter who wrote it. Just keep in mind when it was
    written more than who wrote it.

    Matt
     
    Matimus, Aug 28, 2009
    #2
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  3. [fix top posting]

    > On Fri, Aug 28, 2009 at 8:58 AM, gb345 <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Are there any Python-only modules or packages in the latest releases
    >> of Python 2.x or Python 3.x that were largely written by Guido van
    >> Rossum? What's the best way to find this out? I know that some
    >> modules mention the author(s) in the source code, but this does
    >> not seem to be true most of the time, as far as I can tell.
    >>
    >> I'm interested in reading this code as prime examplars of "Pythonicity".
    >> (I'm sure that many other programmers could serve as models of the
    >> Pythonic ideal, but I doubt that there would be a *less debatable*
    >> choice in this category than GvR.)
    >>
    >> Many thanks in advance,
    >>
    >> Gabe
    >> --
    >> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
    >>

    >

    John Haggerty wrote:
    > How is writing code like a language maintainer going to go towards a
    > philosophic ideal? And more principally why would this be of a

    benefit. In
    > the philosophic world dressing and acting like Socrates isn't necessarily
    > the same as following his ideals and isn't necessarily being Socratic.
    >


    So the poor old BDFL has been reduced to the rank of language
    maintainer. Is it safe to assume that somebody is organising a whip
    round for him? Any and all currencies accepted?

    --
    Kindest regards.

    Mark Lawrence.
     
    Mark Lawrence, Aug 28, 2009
    #3
  4. gb345

    Terry Reedy Guest

    Matimus wrote:
    > On Aug 28, 7:58 am, gb345 <> wrote:
    >> Are there any Python-only modules or packages in the latest releases
    >> of Python 2.x or Python 3.x that were largely written by Guido van
    >> Rossum? What's the best way to find this out? I know that some
    >> modules mention the author(s) in the source code, but this does
    >> not seem to be true most of the time, as far as I can tell.
    >>
    >> I'm interested in reading this code as prime examplars of "Pythonicity".
    >> (I'm sure that many other programmers could serve as models of the
    >> Pythonic ideal, but I doubt that there would be a *less debatable*
    >> choice in this category than GvR.)
    >>
    >> Many thanks in advance,
    >>
    >> Gabe

    >
    > I'm sure there are. You might be able to figure that out by browsing
    > the source repository: http://hg.python.org. But, I wouldn't
    > necessarily say that any code written by Guido would make a good
    > example of 'Pythonic' code. Not that he doesn't create good code, but
    > the language and standards have evolved over time. There may be code
    > that he wrote from the 2.0 days that may have been perfectly
    > 'Pythonic' then but is just out-of-date now.


    I am not aware of any recent stdlib modules written by Guido. I suspect
    most older ones have been updated at least once by someone else.

    > In general though, browsing the standard modules is a good way to find
    > examples, no matter who wrote it. Just keep in mind when it was
    > written more than who wrote it.


    The itertools module is relatively recent and has been recommended as
    one to read.
     
    Terry Reedy, Aug 28, 2009
    #4
  5. Terry Reedy <tjreedy <at> udel.edu> writes
    >
    > I am not aware of any recent stdlib modules written by Guido. I suspect
    > most older ones have been updated at least once by someone else.


    Guido wrote a good deal of the new Python 3 code. However, maintence has now
    turned over to over Python developers. For example, I now maintain 2to3 and the
    io library, both of which were originally written by Guido.

    >
    > > In general though, browsing the standard modules is a good way to find
    > > examples, no matter who wrote it. Just keep in mind when it was
    > > written more than who wrote it.

    >
    > The itertools module is relatively recent and has been recommended as
    > one to read.


    That probably don't do much good for your sense of Pythonicity, since it's
    written in C. :)
     
    Benjamin Peterson, Aug 28, 2009
    #5
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