More stuff added to ch 2 of my programming intro

Discussion in 'Python' started by Alf P. Steinbach, Dec 9, 2009.

  1. Format: PDF
    <url: http://preview.tinyurl.com/ProgrammingBookP3>

    The new stuff, section 2.7, is about programs as simulations and handling data,
    focusing on modeling things. It includes some Python GUI programming. The plan
    is to discuss containers like lists and dictionaries in perhaps two more
    subsections of 2.7, but I'm not quite sure about how to approach that or exactly
    how much to cover, since the intent of ch 2 is to introduce mostly general
    concepts and enable the reader to try out (more or less) interesting things.


    Cheers,

    - Alf

    PS: comments welcome!
     
    Alf P. Steinbach, Dec 9, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. * Alf P. Steinbach:
    > Format: PDF
    > <url: http://preview.tinyurl.com/ProgrammingBookP3>
    >
    > The new stuff, section 2.7, is about programs as simulations and
    > handling data, focusing on modeling things. It includes some Python GUI
    > programming. The plan is to discuss containers like lists and
    > dictionaries in perhaps two more subsections of 2.7, but I'm not quite
    > sure about how to approach that or exactly how much to cover, since the
    > intent of ch 2 is to introduce mostly general concepts and enable the
    > reader to try out (more or less) interesting things.
    >
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > - Alf
    >
    > PS: comments welcome!


    Well, I posted the current doc. It has a not yet quite complete section 2.7.7
    about arrays, and that will be the last subsection of the chapter. I thought
    using the Josephus circle problem as example was pretty neat... :)

    But anyway, comments welcome, even if that last section's not yet finished.


    Cheers,

    - Alf

    PS: Oh, I changed the manuscript title to "Intelligent Person's Intro to
    Programming" -- is that good?
     
    Alf P. Steinbach, Dec 14, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. * Alf P. Steinbach:
    > * Alf P. Steinbach:
    >> Format: PDF
    >> <url: http://preview.tinyurl.com/ProgrammingBookP3>
    >>
    >> The new stuff, section 2.7, is about programs as simulations and
    >> handling data, focusing on modeling things. It includes some Python
    >> GUI programming. The plan is to discuss containers like lists and
    >> dictionaries in perhaps two more subsections of 2.7, but I'm not quite
    >> sure about how to approach that or exactly how much to cover, since
    >> the intent of ch 2 is to introduce mostly general concepts and enable
    >> the reader to try out (more or less) interesting things.
    >>
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >>
    >> - Alf
    >>
    >> PS: comments welcome!

    >
    > Well, I posted the current doc. It has a not yet quite complete section
    > 2.7.7 about arrays, and that will be the last subsection of the
    > chapter. I thought using the Josephus circle problem as example was
    > pretty neat... :)
    >
    > But anyway, comments welcome, even if that last section's not yet finished.


    Well, what's a programming introduction without Lena Söderberg and Blaise Pascal
    -- the beauty & the beast? :)

    So I added them. Examples with some Sierpinsky triangles (from Pascal's
    triangle) and simple photo processing (of Lena). With Lena, Josephus and Blaise
    in the examples it's almost like the Good, the Bad and the Ugly...

    Comments very welcome.

    Especially, from the Python community, I'm pretty sure that there must be more
    Pythonic ways of copying things like my Matrix in section 2.7.7, or conventions
    established for that. Although Python details aren't essential -- since this
    is about programming and so far only about concepts, notwithstanding the photo
    processing not yet delving into actually technical stuff -- it would be Bad to
    teach very inferior ways of using the language. So, Better Ways (considering
    that I've endavoured to introduce only a minimal subset of the language in order
    to teach concepts cleanly!) would be good!

    Current contents listing below (it's now also as PDF on Google Docs).


    Cheers,

    - Alf



    Contents:

    1 Getting started ... 1
    1.1 Python variants, implementations and distributions. 1
    1.2 Download and install a Python implementation. 2
    1.3 Test-drive the Python interpreter. 2
    1.4 Create and run a Python console program. 4
    1.5 Syntax highlighting and programmers’ editors. 6
    1.6 Create and run a Python GUI program. 7
    1.7 About compilation. 9
    1.8 About standalone Windows programs & other kinds. 10
    1.9 Browse the local documentation. 11
    – EOT – ... 12

    2 Basic concepts ... 1
    2.1 Super-basic concept: why programming is not DWIM. 1
    2.2 Reported errors. 4
    2.2.1 Case-sensitivity. 4
    2.2.2 Syntax / compilation errors. 4
    2.2.3 Runtime errors / crashes. 5
    2.3 A programming exploration tool: turtle graphics. 6
    2.4 Naming things. 8
    2.4.1 Naming actions: routines. 8
    2.4.2 Naming data part I: variables. 11
    2.4.3 Naming data part II: routine arguments. 13
    2.5 Controlling the flow of execution. 14
    2.5.1 Repeating actions automatically: loops. 14
    2.5.2 Basic comparisions & boolean values. 16
    2.5.3 Interlude I: a function graph program / about types. 17
    2.5.4 Automated action choices. 21
    2.5.5 Value-producing (function-like) routines. 23
    2.5.6 Interlude II: a graph with zeroes marked / about program structure. 26
    2.5.7 Dynamically nested actions: recursive routines. 28
    2.6 Basic data. 36
    2.6.1 Basic fundamental types / strings & concatenation. 36
    2.6.2 Indexing and single characters (+ vaguely about sequences in general). 39
    2.6.3 Interlude III: a ROT-13 encryption/decryption program, refactoring. 40
    2.6.4 Attributes, methods, objects. 43
    2.6.5 Doc strings. 44
    2.6.6 Interlude IV: attribute names as strings, listing str attributes. 45
    2.6.7 References & automatic garbage collection. 46
    2.7 Programs as simulations / handling data. 51
    2.7.1 Real system, model, user illusion. 51
    2.7.2 Scopes – global versus local variables. 53
    2.7.3 Attribute collections & models with accessor and modifier routines. 57
    2.7.4 Defining your own data types: classes. 63
    2.7.5 Using optional and named actual arguments (Python “keyword” arguments). 68
    2.7.6 Interlude V: a GUI light switch simulation (+ about delegates and MVC). 71
    2.7.7 Indexable collections (arrays). 84
    – EOT – ... 98
     
    Alf P. Steinbach, Dec 16, 2009
    #3
  4. Alf P. Steinbach

    Mensanator Guest

    On Dec 14, 1:23 am, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    > * Alf P. Steinbach:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >   Format: PDF
    > >   <url:http://preview.tinyurl.com/ProgrammingBookP3>

    >
    > > The new stuff, section 2.7, is about programs as simulations and
    > > handling data, focusing on modeling things. It includes some Python GUI
    > > programming. The plan is to discuss containers like lists and
    > > dictionaries in perhaps two more subsections of 2.7, but I'm not quite
    > > sure about how to approach that or exactly how much to cover, since the
    > > intent of ch 2 is to introduce mostly general concepts and enable the
    > > reader to try out (more or less) interesting things.

    >
    > > Cheers,

    >
    > > - Alf

    >
    > > PS: comments welcome!

    >
    > Well, I posted the current doc. It has a not yet quite complete section 2..7.7
    > about arrays, and that will be the last subsection of the chapter.  I thought
    > using the Josephus circle problem as example was pretty neat... :)
    >
    > But anyway, comments welcome, even if that last section's not yet finished.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > - Alf
    >
    > PS: Oh, I changed the manuscript title to "Intelligent Person's Intro to
    > Programming"  --  is that good?


    Sure. After all, "Idiot's Guide to Programming" and "Programming for
    Dummies" are probably already taken, albeit more appropriate.
     
    Mensanator, Dec 16, 2009
    #4
  5. Alf P. Steinbach

    Mensanator Guest

    On Dec 16, 4:41 pm, Mensanator <> wrote:
    > On Dec 14, 1:23 am, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > * Alf P. Steinbach:

    >
    > > >   Format: PDF
    > > >   <url:http://preview.tinyurl.com/ProgrammingBookP3>

    >
    > > > The new stuff, section 2.7, is about programs as simulations and
    > > > handling data, focusing on modeling things. It includes some Python GUI
    > > > programming. The plan is to discuss containers like lists and
    > > > dictionaries in perhaps two more subsections of 2.7, but I'm not quite
    > > > sure about how to approach that or exactly how much to cover, since the
    > > > intent of ch 2 is to introduce mostly general concepts and enable the
    > > > reader to try out (more or less) interesting things.

    >
    > > > Cheers,

    >
    > > > - Alf

    >
    > > > PS: comments welcome!

    >
    > > Well, I posted the current doc. It has a not yet quite complete section 2.7.7
    > > about arrays, and that will be the last subsection of the chapter.  I thought
    > > using the Josephus circle problem as example was pretty neat... :)

    >
    > > But anyway, comments welcome, even if that last section's not yet finished.

    >
    > > Cheers,

    >
    > > - Alf

    >
    > > PS: Oh, I changed the manuscript title to "Intelligent Person's Intro to
    > > Programming"  --  is that good?

    >
    > Sure. After all, "Idiot's Guide to Programming" and "Programming for
    > Dummies" are probably already taken, albeit more appropriate


    Oh, and about Chapter 1.

    If you're going to use version 3.1.1 as your standard, shouldn't
    you also point out that 3.1.1 is NOT bundled with Mac OS X?

    How about devoting a section on downloading the source files
    and compiling it on a Mac?
     
    Mensanator, Dec 16, 2009
    #5
  6. * Mensanator:
    > On Dec 16, 4:41 pm, Mensanator <> wrote:
    >> On Dec 14, 1:23 am, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> * Alf P. Steinbach:
    >>>> Format: PDF
    >>>> <url:http://preview.tinyurl.com/ProgrammingBookP3>
    >>>> The new stuff, section 2.7, is about programs as simulations and
    >>>> handling data, focusing on modeling things. It includes some Python GUI
    >>>> programming. The plan is to discuss containers like lists and
    >>>> dictionaries in perhaps two more subsections of 2.7, but I'm not quite
    >>>> sure about how to approach that or exactly how much to cover, since the
    >>>> intent of ch 2 is to introduce mostly general concepts and enable the
    >>>> reader to try out (more or less) interesting things.
    >>>> Cheers,
    >>>> - Alf
    >>>> PS: comments welcome!
    >>> Well, I posted the current doc. It has a not yet quite complete section 2.7.7
    >>> about arrays, and that will be the last subsection of the chapter. I thought
    >>> using the Josephus circle problem as example was pretty neat... :)
    >>> But anyway, comments welcome, even if that last section's not yet finished.
    >>> Cheers,
    >>> - Alf
    >>> PS: Oh, I changed the manuscript title to "Intelligent Person's Intro to
    >>> Programming" -- is that good?

    >> Sure. After all, "Idiot's Guide to Programming" and "Programming for
    >> Dummies" are probably already taken, albeit more appropriate

    >
    > Oh, and about Chapter 1.
    >
    > If you're going to use version 3.1.1 as your standard, shouldn't
    > you also point out that 3.1.1 is NOT bundled with Mac OS X?
    >
    > How about devoting a section on downloading the source files
    > and compiling it on a Mac?


    Learn to read.

    At the top of every second page it tells you that this is an introduction based
    on Windows.



    Cheers & hth.,

    - Alf
     
    Alf P. Steinbach, Dec 16, 2009
    #6
  7. Alf P. Steinbach

    Mensanator Guest

    On Dec 16, 5:45 pm, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    > * Mensanator:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Dec 16, 4:41 pm, Mensanator <> wrote:
    > >> On Dec 14, 1:23 am, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:

    >
    > >>> * Alf P. Steinbach:
    > >>>>   Format: PDF
    > >>>>   <url:http://preview.tinyurl.com/ProgrammingBookP3>
    > >>>> The new stuff, section 2.7, is about programs as simulations and
    > >>>> handling data, focusing on modeling things. It includes some Python GUI
    > >>>> programming. The plan is to discuss containers like lists and
    > >>>> dictionaries in perhaps two more subsections of 2.7, but I'm not quite
    > >>>> sure about how to approach that or exactly how much to cover, since the
    > >>>> intent of ch 2 is to introduce mostly general concepts and enable the
    > >>>> reader to try out (more or less) interesting things.
    > >>>> Cheers,
    > >>>> - Alf
    > >>>> PS: comments welcome!
    > >>> Well, I posted the current doc. It has a not yet quite complete section 2.7.7
    > >>> about arrays, and that will be the last subsection of the chapter.  I thought
    > >>> using the Josephus circle problem as example was pretty neat... :)
    > >>> But anyway, comments welcome, even if that last section's not yet finished.
    > >>> Cheers,
    > >>> - Alf
    > >>> PS: Oh, I changed the manuscript title to "Intelligent Person's Intro to
    > >>> Programming"  --  is that good?
    > >> Sure. After all, "Idiot's Guide to Programming" and "Programming for
    > >> Dummies" are probably already taken, albeit more appropriate

    >
    > > Oh, and about Chapter 1.

    >
    > > If you're going to use version 3.1.1 as your standard, shouldn't
    > > you also point out that 3.1.1 is NOT bundled with Mac OS X?

    >
    > > How about devoting a section on downloading the source files
    > > and compiling it on a Mac?

    >
    > Learn to read.
    >
    > At the top of every second page it tells you that this is an introduction based
    > on Windows.


    Still, no excuse for giving out mis-information. It's just as easy
    to get these things right.

    >
    > Cheers & hth.,
    >
    > - Alf- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -
     
    Mensanator, Dec 17, 2009
    #7
  8. Alf P. Steinbach

    Ned Deily Guest

    Ned Deily, Dec 17, 2009
    #8
  9. * Mensanator:
    > On Dec 16, 5:45 pm, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    >> * Mensanator:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> On Dec 16, 4:41 pm, Mensanator <> wrote:
    >>>> On Dec 14, 1:23 am, "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    >>>>> * Alf P. Steinbach:
    >>>>>> Format: PDF
    >>>>>> <url:http://preview.tinyurl.com/ProgrammingBookP3>
    >>>>>> The new stuff, section 2.7, is about programs as simulations and
    >>>>>> handling data, focusing on modeling things. It includes some Python GUI
    >>>>>> programming. The plan is to discuss containers like lists and
    >>>>>> dictionaries in perhaps two more subsections of 2.7, but I'm not quite
    >>>>>> sure about how to approach that or exactly how much to cover, since the
    >>>>>> intent of ch 2 is to introduce mostly general concepts and enable the
    >>>>>> reader to try out (more or less) interesting things.
    >>>>>> Cheers,
    >>>>>> - Alf
    >>>>>> PS: comments welcome!
    >>>>> Well, I posted the current doc. It has a not yet quite complete section 2.7.7
    >>>>> about arrays, and that will be the last subsection of the chapter. I thought
    >>>>> using the Josephus circle problem as example was pretty neat... :)
    >>>>> But anyway, comments welcome, even if that last section's not yet finished.
    >>>>> Cheers,
    >>>>> - Alf
    >>>>> PS: Oh, I changed the manuscript title to "Intelligent Person's Intro to
    >>>>> Programming" -- is that good?
    >>>> Sure. After all, "Idiot's Guide to Programming" and "Programming for
    >>>> Dummies" are probably already taken, albeit more appropriate
    >>> Oh, and about Chapter 1.
    >>> If you're going to use version 3.1.1 as your standard, shouldn't
    >>> you also point out that 3.1.1 is NOT bundled with Mac OS X?
    >>> How about devoting a section on downloading the source files
    >>> and compiling it on a Mac?

    >> Learn to read.
    >>
    >> At the top of every second page it tells you that this is an introduction based
    >> on Windows.

    >
    > Still, no excuse for giving out mis-information. It's just as easy
    > to get these things right.


    Why are you not concrete?

    I'd be glad to hear of any concrete mis-information or inaccuracy; that's much
    of the point of asking for public feedback (did you even think about that?).

    Unfortunately one then also get responses from trolls, small kids, idiots, etc..



    Cheers,

    - Alf
     
    Alf P. Steinbach, Dec 17, 2009
    #9
  10. Alf P. Steinbach

    Mensanator Guest

    On Dec 16, 8:45�pm, Ned Deily <> wrote:
    > In article
    > <>,
    >
    > �Mensanator <> wrote:
    > > Oh, and about Chapter 1.

    >
    > > If you're going to use version 3.1.1 as your standard, shouldn't
    > > you also point out that 3.1.1 is NOT bundled with Mac OS X?

    >
    > > How about devoting a section on downloading the source files
    > > and compiling it on a Mac?

    >
    > Why would you do that?


    Oh, I don't know, maybe because I'm thinking about
    buying one and seeing 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 directories
    on the model in the store made me wary.

    >
    > http://www.python.org/download/rele....python.org/ftp/python/3.1.1/python-3.1.1.dmg


    This tells me nothing.

    >
    > or (for MacPorts fans):
    >
    > $ sudo port install python31



    And since I haven't got one, this also tells me nothing.

    >
    > --
    > �Ned Deily,
    > �
     
    Mensanator, Dec 17, 2009
    #10
  11. On Thu, Dec 17, 2009 at 2:25 AM, Mensanator <> wrote:
    > On Dec 16, 8:45�pm, Ned Deily <> wrote:
    >> In article
    >> <>,
    >>
    >> �Mensanator <> wrote:
    >> > Oh, and about Chapter 1.

    >>
    >> > If you're going to use version 3.1.1 as your standard, shouldn't
    >> > you also point out that 3.1.1 is NOT bundled with Mac OS X?

    >>
    >> > How about devoting a section on downloading the source files
    >> > and compiling it on a Mac?

    >>
    >> Why would you do that?

    >
    > Oh, I don't know, maybe because I'm thinking about
    > buying one and seeing 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 directories
    > on the model in the store made me wary.
    >
    >>
    >> http://www.python.org/download/rele....python.org/ftp/python/3.1.1/python-3.1.1.dmg

    >
    > This tells me nothing.
    >
    >>
    >> or (for MacPorts fans):
    >>
    >> $ sudo port install python31

    >
    >
    > And since I haven't got one, this also tells me nothing.


    He just told you what it meant, as if it weren't already obvious.

    Geremy Condra
     
    geremy condra, Dec 17, 2009
    #11
  12. Alf P. Steinbach

    Ned Deily Guest

    In article
    <>,
    Mensanator <> wrote:
    > Oh, I don't know, maybe because I'm thinking about
    > buying one and seeing 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 directories
    > on the model in the store made me wary.


    That's odd since, AFAIK, Apple has never released an OS X with Python
    2.4.

    Current Apple systems ship with OS X 10.6, aka Snow Leopard. 10.6
    includes a Python 2.6.1 (64-bit/32-bit) and a Python 2.5.4 (32-bit
    only). The previous release, 10.5, shipped with 2.5 and 2.3. But, not
    to worry, if you need other versions, you can download OS X installers
    from python.org.

    > > http://www.python.org/download/releases/3.1.1/http://www.python.org/ftp/pyth
    > > on/3.1.1/python-3.1.1.dmg

    >
    > This tells me nothing.


    That's the disk image for the OS X Python 3.1.1 installer. Official
    binary installers for OS X are provided on python.org for every final
    Python release.

    > > or (for MacPorts fans):
    > >
    > > $ sudo port install python31

    >
    >
    > And since I haven't got one, this also tells me nothing.


    http://www.macports.org/

    "The MacPorts Project is an open-source community initiative to design
    an easy-to-use system for compiling, installing, and upgrading either
    command-line, X11 or Aqua based open-source software on the Mac OS X
    operating system."

    --
    Ned Deily,
     
    Ned Deily, Dec 17, 2009
    #12
  13. On Thu, Dec 17, 2009 at 5:33 AM, Ned Deily <> wrote:
    >
    >> > or (for MacPorts fans):
    >> >
    >> > $ sudo port install python31

    >>
    >>
    >> And since I haven't got one, this also tells me nothing.

    >
    > http://www.macports.org/
    >
    > "The MacPorts Project is an open-source community initiative to design
    > an easy-to-use system for compiling, installing, and upgrading either
    > command-line, X11 or Aqua based open-source software on the Mac OS X
    > operating system."


    Description sans marketing fluff: It's a Mac package manager. It's
    basically the same as Gentoo's portage if you've ever used that. It
    downloads source tarballs and patches and then compiles them locally.
    There are built-in lists of "variants", basically sets of configure
    args, to compile each package.
     
    Benjamin Kaplan, Dec 17, 2009
    #13
  14. Alf P. Steinbach

    Mensanator Guest

    On Dec 17, 4:33 am, Ned Deily <> wrote:
    > In article
    > <>,
    >
    >  Mensanator <> wrote:
    > > Oh, I don't know, maybe because I'm thinking about
    > > buying one and seeing 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 directories
    > > on the model in the store made me wary.

    >
    > That's odd since, AFAIK, Apple has never released an OS X with Python
    > 2.4.


    Hmm...I was poking around in the finder on a display of new
    iMacs at Best Buy last saturday. I searched for "python" and
    it took me to a directory listing with three items:
    Python 2.3
    Python 2.4
    Python 2.5

    It's possible that Python 2.6 is located somewhere else. I assume
    that Snow Leopard was installed, but I didn't actually check that.

    >
    > Current Apple systems ship with OS X 10.6, aka Snow Leopard.   10.6
    > includes a Python 2.6.1 (64-bit/32-bit) and a Python 2.5.4 (32-bit
    > only).  The previous release, 10.5, shipped with 2.5 and 2.3.  But, not
    > to worry, if you need other versions, you can download OS X installers
    > from python.org.
    >
    > > >http://www.python.org/download/releases/3.1.1/http://www.python.org/f....
    > > > on/3.1.1/python-3.1.1.dmg

    >
    > > This tells me nothing.

    >
    > That's the disk image for the OS X Python 3.1.1 installer.  


    But it doesn't say whether that disk image is compatible with
    Snow Leopard and I don't take such things for granted.

    > Official
    > binary installers for OS X are provided on python.org for every final
    > Python release.
    >
    > > > or (for MacPorts fans):

    >
    > > > $ sudo port install python31

    >
    > > And since I haven't got one, this also tells me nothing.

    >
    > http://www.macports.org/
    >
    > "The MacPorts Project is an open-source community initiative to design
    > an easy-to-use system for compiling, installing, and upgrading either
    > command-line, X11 or Aqua based open-source software on the Mac OS X
    > operating system."


    Ok, now I know. Thanks for the information.

    >
    > --
    >  Ned Deily,
    >  
     
    Mensanator, Dec 17, 2009
    #14
  15. Alf P. Steinbach

    Mensanator Guest

    On Dec 17, 10:12 am, Benjamin Kaplan <> wrote:
    > On Thu, Dec 17, 2009 at 5:33 AM, Ned Deily <> wrote:
    >
    > >> > or (for MacPorts fans):

    >
    > >> > $ sudo port install python31

    >
    > >> And since I haven't got one, this also tells me nothing.

    >
    > >http://www.macports.org/

    >
    > > "The MacPorts Project is an open-source community initiative to design
    > > an easy-to-use system for compiling, installing, and upgrading either
    > > command-line, X11 or Aqua based open-source software on the Mac OS X
    > > operating system."

    >
    > Description sans marketing fluff: It's a Mac package manager. It's
    > basically the same as Gentoo's portage if you've ever used that. It
    > downloads source tarballs and patches and then compiles them locally.
    > There are built-in lists of "variants", basically sets of configure
    > args, to compile each package.


    That's the kind of thing I want to hear.

    Looks like I can go ahead and get a Mac and not worry about getting
    3.1.1 installed.

    Thanks.
     
    Mensanator, Dec 17, 2009
    #15
  16. Alf P. Steinbach

    Mensanator Guest

    On Dec 17, 1:40 am, geremy condra <> wrote:
    > On Thu, Dec 17, 2009 at 2:25 AM, Mensanator <> wrote:
    > > On Dec 16, 8:45 pm, Ned Deily <> wrote:
    > >> In article
    > >> <>,

    >
    > >> Mensanator <> wrote:
    > >> > Oh, and about Chapter 1.

    >
    > >> > If you're going to use version 3.1.1 as your standard, shouldn't
    > >> > you also point out that 3.1.1 is NOT bundled with Mac OS X?

    >
    > >> > How about devoting a section on downloading the source files
    > >> > and compiling it on a Mac?

    >
    > >> Why would you do that?

    >
    > > Oh, I don't know, maybe because I'm thinking about
    > > buying one and seeing 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 directories
    > > on the model in the store made me wary.

    >
    > >>http://www.python.org/download/releases/3.1.1/http://www.python.org/f....

    >
    > > This tells me nothing.

    >
    > >> or (for MacPorts fans):

    >
    > >> $ sudo port install python31

    >
    > > And since I haven't got one, this also tells me nothing.

    >
    > He just told you what it meant, as if it weren't already obvious.


    Why would it be obvious? I use a PC, for which
    $ sudo port install python31
    is meaningless. Is MacPorts bundled with Snow Leopard?

    Or do I have to do this first:

    MacPorts version 1.8.1 is available in various formats for download
    and installation (note, if you are upgrading your Mac OS X to a new
    major release, see the migration info page):

    “dmg” disk images for Snow Leopard, Leopard and Tiger as a legacy
    platform, containing pkg installers for use with the Mac OS X
    Installer. By far the simplest installation procedure that most users
    should follow after meeting the requirements listed below.

    In source form as either a tar.bz2 package or a tar.gz one for manual
    compilation, if you intend to customize your installation in any way.

    SVN checkout of the unpackaged sources, if you wish to follow MacPorts
    development.

    The selfupdate target of the port(1) command, for users who already
    have MacPorts installed and wish to upgrade to a newer release.

    Checksums for our packaged downloads are contained in the
    corresponding checksums file.

    Please note that in order to install and run MacPorts on Mac OS X,
    your system must have installations of the following components:

    Apple's Xcode Developer Tools (version 3.2.1 or later for Snow
    Leopard, 3.1.4 or later for Leopard, or 2.5 for Tiger), found at the
    Apple Developer Connection site or on your Mac OS X installation CDs/
    DVD.

    Ensure that the optional components for command line development are
    installed ("Unix Development" in the Xcode 3.x installer).

    The X11 windowing environment (A.K.A. “X11 User”) for ports that
    depend on the functionality it provides to run.

    The “X11 User” package is an optional installation on your system CDs/
    DVD for Tiger, enabled through the “Customize” button of the
    installer, whereas it is included by default on Leopard and Snow
    Leopard.

    You can use the xorg-server port instead of Apple's X11.app if you
    wish.



    >
    > Geremy Condra
     
    Mensanator, Dec 17, 2009
    #16
  17. Alf P. Steinbach

    Ned Deily Guest

    In article
    <>,
    Mensanator <> wrote:
    > > That's the disk image for the OS X Python 3.1.1 installer.  

    >
    > But it doesn't say whether that disk image is compatible with
    > Snow Leopard and I don't take such things for granted.


    That's a good point. There should be stated there somewhere about which
    operating systems are supported. For the record, 3.1.1 has been tested
    on 10.4, 10.5, and 10.6 and should work on 10.3.9.

    --
    Ned Deily,
     
    Ned Deily, Dec 18, 2009
    #17
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. TechBookReport

    Looking for an intro C programming book?

    TechBookReport, Feb 19, 2004, in forum: C Programming
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    441
    Peter Nilsson
    Feb 22, 2004
  2. Boogie El Aceitoso

    Intro to concurrent programming with python

    Boogie El Aceitoso, Mar 5, 2004, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    2,493
    Jeff Duffy
    Mar 5, 2004
  3. Wingware
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    394
    Wingware
    Aug 3, 2007
  4. Alf P. Steinbach
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    717
    Alf P. Steinbach
    Dec 20, 2009
  5. Tom Payne
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    119
    Robert Dober
    May 5, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page