need a new Java Editor, netbeans isnt cutting it.

Discussion in 'Java' started by Justin, Nov 15, 2006.

  1. Justin

    Justin Guest

    I have two laptops, both have intel centrino duo processors, both run
    on XP Media Center edition, one a 1gig ram, the other 2gigs.
    Currently, I use Netbeans to write code. Today, I was using the faster
    laptop, I've been coding for about 6 hours, and NetBeans has crashed
    twice. To me, that's unnacceptable. What are recommendations for
    editors to hack code?

    Thanks
     
    Justin, Nov 15, 2006
    #1
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  2. Justin wrote:
    > I have two laptops, both have intel centrino duo processors, both run
    > on XP Media Center edition, one a 1gig ram, the other 2gigs.
    > Currently, I use Netbeans to write code. Today, I was using the faster
    > laptop, I've been coding for about 6 hours, and NetBeans has crashed
    > twice. To me, that's unnacceptable. What are recommendations for
    > editors to hack code?
    >
    > Thanks


    emacs is very stable.
     
    Furious George, Nov 15, 2006
    #2
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  3. Justin wrote:
    > I have two laptops, both have intel centrino duo processors, both run
    > on XP Media Center edition, one a 1gig ram, the other 2gigs.
    > Currently, I use Netbeans to write code. Today, I was using the faster
    > laptop, I've been coding for about 6 hours, and NetBeans has crashed
    > twice. To me, that's unnacceptable. What are recommendations for
    > editors to hack code?


    Have you tried Eclipse ?

    Arne
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Nov 15, 2006
    #3
  4. Justin

    tiewknvc9 Guest

    download ECLIPSE! Once set up, it does really kick ass.

    Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > Justin wrote:
    > > I have two laptops, both have intel centrino duo processors, both run
    > > on XP Media Center edition, one a 1gig ram, the other 2gigs.
    > > Currently, I use Netbeans to write code. Today, I was using the faster
    > > laptop, I've been coding for about 6 hours, and NetBeans has crashed
    > > twice. To me, that's unnacceptable. What are recommendations for
    > > editors to hack code?

    >
    > Have you tried Eclipse ?
    >
    > Arne
     
    tiewknvc9, Nov 15, 2006
    #4
  5. Justin wrote:
    > I have two laptops, both have intel centrino duo processors, both run
    > on XP Media Center edition, one a 1gig ram, the other 2gigs.
    > Currently, I use Netbeans to write code. Today, I was using the faster
    > laptop, I've been coding for about 6 hours, and NetBeans has crashed
    > twice. To me, that's unnacceptable. What are recommendations for
    > editors to hack code?
    >
    > Thanks
    >


    I like Vim.

    --

    Knute Johnson
    email s/nospam/knute/
     
    Knute Johnson, Nov 15, 2006
    #5
  6. Justin

    David Segall Guest

    "Justin" <> wrote:

    >I have two laptops, both have intel centrino duo processors, both run
    >on XP Media Center edition, one a 1gig ram, the other 2gigs.
    >Currently, I use Netbeans to write code. Today, I was using the faster
    >laptop, I've been coding for about 6 hours, and NetBeans has crashed
    >twice. To me, that's unnacceptable. What are recommendations for
    >editors to hack code?

    Which version of NetBeans are you using?
     
    David Segall, Nov 15, 2006
    #6
  7. Justin

    Lionel Guest

    David Segall wrote:
    > "Justin" <> wrote:
    >
    >> I have two laptops, both have intel centrino duo processors, both run
    >> on XP Media Center edition, one a 1gig ram, the other 2gigs.
    >> Currently, I use Netbeans to write code. Today, I was using the faster
    >> laptop, I've been coding for about 6 hours, and NetBeans has crashed
    >> twice. To me, that's unnacceptable. What are recommendations for
    >> editors to hack code?

    > Which version of NetBeans are you using?


    This is a good question. Netbeans has /never/ crashed on me! I've been
    using it since 3.x.

    The problem may be elsewhere or you may be using a beta version.

    Lionel.
     
    Lionel, Nov 15, 2006
    #7
  8. Justin

    Guest

    I second the vote for Eclipse. The interface is great and so is the
    support for it. It also helps you out a lot when it comes to error
    messages, warnings, etc. The "Quick Fix" option is handy for
    debugging. Also, there are a lot of add-ons for Eclipse that makes
    coding and documentation a lot easier. USE ECLIPSE, YOU WILL LIKE IT!


    Lionel wrote:
    > David Segall wrote:
    > > "Justin" <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I have two laptops, both have intel centrino duo processors, both run
    > >> on XP Media Center edition, one a 1gig ram, the other 2gigs.
    > >> Currently, I use Netbeans to write code. Today, I was using the faster
    > >> laptop, I've been coding for about 6 hours, and NetBeans has crashed
    > >> twice. To me, that's unnacceptable. What are recommendations for
    > >> editors to hack code?

    > > Which version of NetBeans are you using?

    >
    > This is a good question. Netbeans has /never/ crashed on me! I've been
    > using it since 3.x.
    >
    > The problem may be elsewhere or you may be using a beta version.
    >
    > Lionel.
     
    , Nov 15, 2006
    #8
  9. Justin

    Guest

    Aside from setting up where you want your workspace to be (where to
    save to) and what directories to create projects in, there's no setup
    required. It's very easy to use...it's fast...and it rarely gives me
    trouble.


    C Student wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > I second the vote for Eclipse. The interface is great and so is the
    > > support for it. It also helps you out a lot when it comes to error
    > > messages, warnings, etc. The "Quick Fix" option is handy for
    > > debugging. Also, there are a lot of add-ons for Eclipse that makes
    > > coding and documentation a lot easier. USE ECLIPSE, YOU WILL LIKE IT!
    > >

    >
    > Is it just me or does eclipse require a lot of stuffing around to get
    > working? netbeans just works out of the box.
     
    , Nov 15, 2006
    #9
  10. Justin

    C Student Guest

    wrote:
    > I second the vote for Eclipse. The interface is great and so is the
    > support for it. It also helps you out a lot when it comes to error
    > messages, warnings, etc. The "Quick Fix" option is handy for
    > debugging. Also, there are a lot of add-ons for Eclipse that makes
    > coding and documentation a lot easier. USE ECLIPSE, YOU WILL LIKE IT!
    >


    Is it just me or does eclipse require a lot of stuffing around to get
    working? netbeans just works out of the box.
     
    C Student, Nov 15, 2006
    #10
  11. Justin

    Guest

    If you are typing out a class name and looking to find the methods
    contained within that class, an "autocomplete" type box will pop up,
    for example if you were typing "System." a box would pop up showing all
    the methods for the System class. So the Java API is basically there
    for you "on the fly". As far as plugins go...they are basically like
    Firefox extensions if you are familiar with those. Yes you may have to
    download plugins for extended functionalities, but they should be
    self-installing and self-configuring.


    C Student wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > Aside from setting up where you want your workspace to be (where to
    > > save to) and what directories to create projects in, there's no setup
    > > required. It's very easy to use...it's fast...and it rarely gives me
    > > trouble.
    > >

    >
    > Ok so you don't need to manually install a ton of different plugins to
    > get a working ide with gui editors and the like. Thats good I haven't
    > looked at it in a while when I last looked at it I couldn't get it to
    > work.
    >
    > Also is it possible to search the java documentation from within
    > eclipse. netbeans seems to support it but I can't get it to work.
    >
    > also is it possible to press f1 on a command and have documentation
    > pop up for that command?
     
    , Nov 15, 2006
    #11
  12. Justin

    C Student Guest

    wrote:
    > Aside from setting up where you want your workspace to be (where to
    > save to) and what directories to create projects in, there's no setup
    > required. It's very easy to use...it's fast...and it rarely gives me
    > trouble.
    >


    Ok so you don't need to manually install a ton of different plugins to
    get a working ide with gui editors and the like. Thats good I haven't
    looked at it in a while when I last looked at it I couldn't get it to
    work.

    Also is it possible to search the java documentation from within
    eclipse. netbeans seems to support it but I can't get it to work.

    also is it possible to press f1 on a command and have documentation
    pop up for that command?
     
    C Student, Nov 15, 2006
    #12
  13. C Student schrieb:
    >
    > Ok so you don't need to manually install a ton of different plugins to
    > get a working ide with gui editors and the like. Thats good I haven't
    > looked at it in a while when I last looked at it I couldn't get it to work.


    I think it doesn't matter much which IDE one uses - to me it's just a
    matter of taste. I prefer NetBeans over Eclipse but perhaps this is just
    because Eclipse *was* very slow when I tried it first on Linux. Eclipse
    has the advantage of an incremental compiler (I don't like this feature,
    so I disabled automatic building in Eclipse).

    >
    > Also is it possible to search the java documentation from within
    > eclipse. netbeans seems to support it but I can't get it to work.


    Shift-F1 opens the Javadoc Index Search. NetBeans automatically looks
    after the word you were located.

    Another possibility is to use Alt-F1 which opens the Javadoc in an
    external browser.

    >
    > also is it possible to press f1 on a command and have documentation pop
    > up for that command?


    Press Ctrl-Space to get the code completion window. NetBeans
    automatically pops up the JavaDoc for the selected class or method.

    If you don't receive any of the documentation then I'd guess you didn't
    specify the location of the Javadocs (properly).

    Open Tools->Platform Manager, select the platform you're working with
    and go to the Javadoc tab. Press the "Add ZIP/Folder" button and select
    either the ZIP file that contains the JDK Javadocs or the directory...

    Bye
    Michael
     
    Michael Rauscher, Nov 15, 2006
    #13
  14. Knute Johnson wrote:
    > Justin wrote:
    >> I have two laptops, both have intel centrino duo processors, both run
    >> on XP Media Center edition, one a 1gig ram, the other 2gigs.
    >> Currently, I use Netbeans to write code. Today, I was using the faster
    >> laptop, I've been coding for about 6 hours, and NetBeans has crashed
    >> twice. To me, that's unnacceptable. What are recommendations for
    >> editors to hack code?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>

    >
    > I like Vim.


    Me, too.
     
    Jeffrey Schwab, Nov 15, 2006
    #14
  15. Justin

    Lionel Guest

    wrote:
    > I second the vote for Eclipse. The interface is great and so is the
    > support for it. It also helps you out a lot when it comes to error
    > messages, warnings, etc. The "Quick Fix" option is handy for
    > debugging. Also, there are a lot of add-ons for Eclipse that makes
    > coding and documentation a lot easier. USE ECLIPSE, YOU WILL LIKE IT!



    I didn't first it :). The two IDE's are much and muchness.

    Lionel.
     
    Lionel, Nov 15, 2006
    #15
  16. Justin

    Lionel Guest

    Michael Rauscher wrote:
    > C Student schrieb:
    >>
    >> Ok so you don't need to manually install a ton of different plugins to
    >> get a working ide with gui editors and the like. Thats good I haven't
    >> looked at it in a while when I last looked at it I couldn't get it to
    >> work.

    >
    > I think it doesn't matter much which IDE one uses - to me it's just a
    > matter of taste.


    I agree.

    I prefer NetBeans over Eclipse but perhaps this is just
    > because Eclipse *was* very slow when I tried it first on Linux. Eclipse
    > has the advantage of an incremental compiler (I don't like this feature,
    > so I disabled automatic building in Eclipse).


    I had a similar experience. First time I tried Eclipse it was just a
    tar.gz and I couldn't get it to run. Second time I tried Eclipse was on
    Redhat (which must be the worst of the distro's despite it's popularity)
    and it was so incredibly slow, Eclipse was incredibly memory hungry that
    there was no way of doing anything. Third time I tried it was tolerable
    but after looking around for a few minutes I decided there wasn't going
    to be anything special and I may as well not waste my time learning a
    new IDE.

    Lionel.
     
    Lionel, Nov 15, 2006
    #16
  17. Justin

    Guest

    I think you'll love Eclipse at www.eclipse.org

    IRAD is pretty awesome too, if you can get version 6.1. Of course, it
    does have a price tag.

    There are lots of great plugins for eclipse though.


    -Cameron McKenzie
    Author of the SCJA Certification Guide and What is WebSphere?


    Certification Resources: www.examscam.com
    Free WebSphere Tutorials: www.pulpjava.com
    Free Mock Java Certification Exams: www.scja.com
    Free J2EE and Java Multimedia Tutorials: www.mcnz.com


    Lionel wrote:
    > Michael Rauscher wrote:
    > > C Student schrieb:
    > >>
    > >> Ok so you don't need to manually install a ton of different plugins to
    > >> get a working ide with gui editors and the like. Thats good I haven't
    > >> looked at it in a while when I last looked at it I couldn't get it to
    > >> work.

    > >
    > > I think it doesn't matter much which IDE one uses - to me it's just a
    > > matter of taste.

    >
    > I agree.
    >
    > I prefer NetBeans over Eclipse but perhaps this is just
    > > because Eclipse *was* very slow when I tried it first on Linux. Eclipse
    > > has the advantage of an incremental compiler (I don't like this feature,
    > > so I disabled automatic building in Eclipse).

    >
    > I had a similar experience. First time I tried Eclipse it was just a
    > tar.gz and I couldn't get it to run. Second time I tried Eclipse was on
    > Redhat (which must be the worst of the distro's despite it's popularity)
    > and it was so incredibly slow, Eclipse was incredibly memory hungry that
    > there was no way of doing anything. Third time I tried it was tolerable
    > but after looking around for a few minutes I decided there wasn't going
    > to be anything special and I may as well not waste my time learning a
    > new IDE.
    >
    > Lionel.
     
    , Nov 15, 2006
    #17
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