Need GUI pop-up to edit a (unicode ?) string

Discussion in 'Python' started by Rikishi42, Jan 22, 2011.

  1. Rikishi42

    Rikishi42 Guest

    I'm in need for a graphical pop-up that will display a (unicode ?) string in
    a field, allow the user to change it and return the modified string.

    Maybe also keep the original one displayed above it.


    Something like this:
    +-------------------------------------------------+
    | Please confirm or edit the following string |
    | |
    | Original_example_string |
    | |
    | +-------------------------------------------+ |
    | | Original_about_to_be_changed | |
    | +-------------------------------------------+ |
    | |
    | OK |
    | |
    +-------------------------------------------------+


    I've never used any kind of graphical interface programing before, so I
    don't have a clue where to start.
    This would, however, be the *only* GUI part in the app at this point.

    From what I can see the solution lays with PyQT, but the docs I find are
    courses that aim to teach the whole GUI tool. I only need a little pop-up to
    alow a user to edit part of a filename, for instance.


    I'm using Python 2.6.x on various Linux platforms (mainly openSUSE and Mint)
    and on Windows. Windows support is not important, in this case.



    --
    When in doubt, use brute force.
    -- Ken Thompson
    Rikishi42, Jan 22, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On 01/22/2011 03:22 PM, Rikishi42 wrote:
    >
    > I'm in need for a graphical pop-up that will display a (unicode ?) string in
    > a field, allow the user to change it and return the modified string.
    >
    > Maybe also keep the original one displayed above it.
    >
    >
    > Something like this:
    > +-------------------------------------------------+
    > | Please confirm or edit the following string |
    > | |
    > | Original_example_string |
    > | |
    > | +-------------------------------------------+ |
    > | | Original_about_to_be_changed | |
    > | +-------------------------------------------+ |
    > | |
    > | OK |
    > | |
    > +-------------------------------------------------+
    >
    >
    > I've never used any kind of graphical interface programing before, so I
    > don't have a clue where to start.
    > This would, however, be the *only* GUI part in the app at this point.
    >
    >> From what I can see the solution lays with PyQT, but the docs I find are

    > courses that aim to teach the whole GUI tool. I only need a little pop-up to
    > alow a user to edit part of a filename, for instance.
    >
    >
    > I'm using Python 2.6.x on various Linux platforms (mainly openSUSE and Mint)
    > and on Windows. Windows support is not important, in this case.
    >
    >
    >


    If that is all you need, I suggest Tkinter. Nice and easy, comes built
    into Python. Looks like you need two labels, an entry, and a button.
    When I was learning Tkinter I used http://effbot.org/tkinterbook/.

    Hope it helped,
    ~Corey
    Corey Richardson, Jan 22, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On Sat, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:22 PM, Rikishi42 <> wrote:
    >
    > I'm in need for a graphical pop-up that will display a (unicode ?) string in
    > a field, allow the user to change it and return the modified string.
    >
    > Maybe also keep the original one displayed above it.
    >
    >
    > Something like this:
    > +-------------------------------------------------+
    > |   Please confirm or edit the following string   |
    > |                                                 |
    > |     Original_example_string                     |
    > |                                                 |
    > |  +-------------------------------------------+  |
    > |  |  Original_about_to_be_changed             |  |
    > |  +-------------------------------------------+  |
    > |                                                 |
    > |                     OK                          |
    > |                                                 |
    > +-------------------------------------------------+
    >
    >
    > I've never used any kind of graphical interface programing before, so I
    > don't have a clue where to start.
    > This would, however, be the *only* GUI part in the app at this point.
    >
    > >From what I can see the solution lays with PyQT, but the docs I find are

    > courses that aim to teach the whole GUI tool. I only need a little pop-up to
    > alow a user to edit part of a filename, for instance.
    >
    >
    > I'm using Python 2.6.x on various Linux platforms (mainly openSUSE and Mint)
    > and on Windows. Windows support is not important, in this case.


    If windows doesn't matter to you, just use Zenity. Here's a python
    function wrapping zenity that does what you want:

    import commands

    def confirm_or_edit(s):
    zenity = 'zenity'
    mode = '--entry'
    text = "--text='Please confirm or edit the following string:'"
    title = "--title='confirm or edit'"
    entry = "--entry-text='%s'" % s
    cmd = ' '.join([zenity, mode, text, title, entry])
    status, output = commands.getstatusoutput(cmd)
    if status: raise Exception("Couldn't run zenity")
    return output

    There's also a full-blown API for zenity, but this should do what you want.

    Geremy Condra
    geremy condra, Jan 22, 2011
    #3
  4. Rikishi42

    Rikishi42 Guest

    On 2011-01-22, Corey Richardson <> wrote:
    > On 01/22/2011 03:22 PM, Rikishi42 wrote:
    >>
    >> I'm in need for a graphical pop-up that will display a (unicode ?) string in
    >> a field, allow the user to change it and return the modified string.
    >>


    > If that is all you need, I suggest Tkinter. Nice and easy, comes built
    > into Python. Looks like you need two labels, an entry, and a button.
    > When I was learning Tkinter I used http://effbot.org/tkinterbook/.


    I had to add Tkinter, which was not isntalled on my machine.

    But it looks easy enough, I'll definitively look into it.


    Thanks !


    --
    When in doubt, use brute force.
    -- Ken Thompson
    Rikishi42, Jan 22, 2011
    #4
  5. On 2011-01-22, Corey Richardson <> wrote:

    > If that is all you need, I suggest Tkinter. Nice and easy, comes built
    > into Python.


    In some Linux distros, that is. Not in all of them.

    --
    Grant
    Grant Edwards, Jan 23, 2011
    #5
  6. Rikishi42

    Rikishi42 Guest

    On 2011-01-22, geremy condra <> wrote:
    > If windows doesn't matter to you, just use Zenity. Here's a python
    > function wrapping zenity that does what you want:
    >
    > import commands
    >
    > def confirm_or_edit(s):
    > zenity = 'zenity'
    > mode = '--entry'
    > text = "--text='Please confirm or edit the following string:'"
    > title = "--title='confirm or edit'"
    > entry = "--entry-text='%s'" % s
    > cmd = ' '.join([zenity, mode, text, title, entry])
    > status, output = commands.getstatusoutput(cmd)
    > if status: raise Exception("Couldn't run zenity")
    > return output
    >
    > There's also a full-blown API for zenity, but this should do what you want.


    Very, very nice. Thanks !

    I'm amazed at how many GUI's are available.


    No wonder I couldn't find "the" interface, there are too many. :)




    --
    When in doubt, use brute force.
    -- Ken Thompson
    Rikishi42, Jan 23, 2011
    #6
  7. Rikishi42

    rantingrick Guest

    On Jan 22, 2:22 pm, Rikishi42 <> wrote:
    > I'm in need for a graphical pop-up that will display a (unicode ?) string in
    > a field, allow the user to change it and return the modified string.
    >
    > Maybe also keep the original one displayed above it.
    >
    > Something like this:
    > +-------------------------------------------------+
    > |   Please confirm or edit the following string   |
    > |                                                 |
    > |     Original_example_string                     |
    > |                                                 |
    > |  +-------------------------------------------+  |
    > |  |  Original_about_to_be_changed             |  |
    > |  +-------------------------------------------+  |
    > |                                                 |
    > |                     OK                          |
    > |                                                 |
    > +-------------------------------------------------+


    If you download wxPython and build it with unicdode support (i did not
    for my version!) you can use a simple textctrl and a statictext to
    display this.

    For an example of how to do this download the wxPython demo and in the
    tree menu under the "miscellaneous" node pick the "Unicode" example.
    You will be able to see both the source code and run a demo of this
    example strait from the demo GUI! If you need help turning the demo
    code into something usable for your script then post back here and i
    will help you create whatever you want.
    rantingrick, Jan 24, 2011
    #7
  8. Rikishi42

    Bryan Guest

    On Jan 22, 2:22 pm, Rikishi42 <> wrote:
    > I'm in need for a graphical pop-up that will display a (unicode ?) string in
    > a field, allow the user to change it and return the modified string.
    >
    > Maybe also keep the original one displayed above it.
    >
    > Something like this:
    > +-------------------------------------------------+
    > |   Please confirm or edit the following string   |
    > |                                                 |
    > |     Original_example_string                     |
    > |                                                 |
    > |  +-------------------------------------------+  |
    > |  |  Original_about_to_be_changed             |  |
    > |  +-------------------------------------------+  |
    > |                                                 |
    > |                     OK                          |
    > |                                                 |
    > +-------------------------------------------------+
    >
    > I've never used any kind of graphical interface programing before, so I
    > don't have a clue where to start.
    > This would, however, be the *only* GUI part in the app at this point.
    >
    > From what I can see the solution lays with PyQT, but the docs I find are
    > courses that aim to teach the whole GUI tool. I only need a little pop-up to
    > alow a user to edit part of a filename, for instance.
    >
    > I'm using Python 2.6.x on various Linux platforms (mainly openSUSE and Mint)
    > and on Windows. Windows support is not important, in this case.


    tkinter is likely the easiest solution. Here's a quick hack, assuming
    you want a program with a single window, rather than dialog you can
    pop up. This has no cancel button since you didn't specify you wanted
    one. It just pops up a window, and when you press ok, <return> or
    dismiss via the window manager, the edited value will be printed to
    stdout. It's not a perfect solution but it gives you a feel for how
    easy it is to do with tkinter.

    import Tkinter as tk

    class App(tk.Tk):
    def __init__(self, s):
    tk.Tk.__init__(self)
    self.wm_title("Edit the string")

    # the main layout is composed of four areas:
    # 1) the label / instructions
    # 2) the original value
    # 3) the edit field
    # 4) a row of buttons
    label = tk.Label(self, text="Please confirm or edit the
    following string:")
    oframe = tk.LabelFrame(text="Original:")
    eframe = tk.LabelFrame(text="Edited:")
    buttons = tk.Frame(self)

    orig = tk.Entry(self, width=40)
    edit = tk.Entry(self, width=40)
    edit.insert(0, s)
    orig.insert(0, s)
    orig.config(state="disabled")
    ok = tk.Button(self, text="Ok", command=self.ok,
    default="active")

    # this does all the layout
    label.pack(side="top", fill="both", expand=True)
    oframe.pack(side="top", fill="both", expand=True, padx=4)
    eframe.pack(side="top", fill="both", expand=True, padx=4,
    pady=(4,0))
    orig.pack(in_=oframe, side="top", fill="x", padx=4, pady=4)
    edit.pack(in_=eframe, side="top", fill="x", padx=4, pady=4)
    buttons.pack(side="bottom", fill="x", pady=4)
    ok.pack(in_=buttons, expand=True)

    edit.select_range(0, "end")
    edit.bind("<Return>", lambda event: self.ok)
    self.wm_protocol("WM_DELETE_WINDOW", self.ok)
    edit.focus()

    # keep a reference so self.ok can access it
    self.edit = edit

    def ok(self):
    value = self.edit.get()
    print value
    self.destroy()

    if __name__ == "__main__":
    import sys
    try:
    s = sys.argv[1]
    except:
    s = "Hello, world"
    app = App(s)
    app.mainloop()
    Bryan, Jan 25, 2011
    #8
  9. Rikishi42

    rantingrick Guest

    On Jan 25, 3:54 pm, Bryan <> wrote:

    > tkinter is likely the easiest solution. Here's a quick hack,


    [...snip code...]

    Well this is nice Bryan however it should be much easier than this.
    Basically your code is creating most of the functionality that should
    be wrapped up in a Dialog class. Tkinter has the tkSimpleDialog from
    which one can inherit and build custom dialogs like the one you have
    here however it has a major flaw! Fredrick choose not give the class a
    show method and instead just threw all the code that should be in a
    "show" method into the __init__ method. This is not a good idea. And
    i'll explain why...

    What Fredrick was trying to do was to make noob programmers life
    easier. And he accomplished this in a specific way! However by NOT
    creating a show method he has at the same time handicapped these same
    people! The proper way to use a dialog class is...

    * Subclass a built-in in Dialog class and insert some widgets.
    class MyDialog(tkSimpleDialog.Dialog): blah

    * Create and instance of your custom dialog.
    dlg = MyDialog(blah)

    * Configure any widget values (if needed!)
    dlg.origText['text'] = unicodestring

    * and show the dialog
    dlg.show(blah)

    This design pattern promotes reuse-ability and encapsulation. However
    with Fredricks design you cannot configure the contained widgets after
    creating the instance because the dialog has entered a local event
    loop brought on by "self.wait_window(self)" which is in the DAMN
    INITIAL METHOD! This is a major flaw in the design and i would be
    happy to fix the flaw. However our "friend" Fredrick decided to
    copyright the module to himself! What a jerk! Which is quite
    disgusting considering that Tkinter, and TclTk are completely open
    source!

    And i don't want to hear any arguments about invoking the __init__
    method because if you read the source you will see why doing that is
    completely ridiculous because of Fredericks design. This is another
    example of how few people actually use Tkinter. If many people where
    using the module obviously bad code such as this would not exist for
    14 years! Someone would have complained.

    If Frederic wants some pointers for how to create a proper dialog he
    should contact me, or we should have a discussion here. The sad thing
    is that this dialog has not been fixed since 1997. And you people
    wonder why i hate Tkinter!
    rantingrick, Jan 25, 2011
    #9
  10. Rikishi42

    Terry Reedy Guest

    On 1/25/2011 6:02 PM, rantingrick wrote:

    > This design pattern promotes reuse-ability and encapsulation. However
    > with Fredricks design you cannot configure the contained widgets after
    > creating the instance because the dialog has entered a local event
    > loop brought on by "self.wait_window(self)" which is in the DAMN
    > INITIAL METHOD!


    I only see "self.wait_window(self)" in the Dialog base class and not in
    SimpleDialog, which is what I though you were talking about. It is the
    last line of Dialog.__init__. It appears that the intention is that all
    configuration be done in the body and button_box methods which are
    called earlier.

    > This is a major flaw in the design and i would be
    > happy to fix the flaw. However our "friend" Fredrick decided to
    > copyright the module to himself!


    As far as I know, anything contributed to the stdlib has been licensed
    by the author to be redistributed under the Python license and can be
    patched by the developers. (This is one reason for people to not
    contribute their code to the stdlib.)

    --
    Terry Jan Reedy
    Terry Reedy, Jan 26, 2011
    #10
  11. Rikishi42

    rantingrick Guest

    On Jan 26, 12:53 am, Terry Reedy <> wrote:

    > I only see "self.wait_window(self)" in the Dialog base class and not in
    > SimpleDialog, which is what I though you were talking about. It is the
    > last line of Dialog.__init__.


    Yes. In the module "tkSimpleDialog" the class "Dialog" is what i am
    referring to. Sorry for the confusion.

    > It appears that the intention is that all
    > configuration be done in the body and button_box methods which are
    > called earlier.


    Yes exactly. And this works well most of the time. However there are
    many times where you may want to create a dialog with say a Label. And
    you do not want to hard code the string displayed on the label.
    However you cannot change the string once you initialize the dialog
    because it enters a "modal wait loop". So what i am proposing is that
    we change tkSimpleDialog to be like any other modal dialogs out there.
    We move the modal code into a show method and use the dialog like i
    suggested. I can send you a patch if you would be interested. My patch
    does break backward compatibility. However we can make it compatible
    somehow. Or an alternative approach would be to create a new dialog
    module and then depreciate tkSimpleDialog. Let me know on or off list
    if you are interested.

    > As far as I know, anything contributed to the stdlib has been licensed
    > by the author to be redistributed under the Python license and can be
    > patched by the developers. (This is one reason for people to not
    > contribute their code to the stdlib.)


    I don't understand what that means. Are you suggesting that
    contributing code is bad?
    rantingrick, Jan 26, 2011
    #11
  12. Rikishi42

    Terry Reedy Guest

    On 1/26/2011 2:11 AM, rantingrick wrote:
    > On Jan 26, 12:53 am, Terry Reedy<> wrote:
    >
    >> I only see "self.wait_window(self)" in the Dialog base class and not in
    >> SimpleDialog, which is what I though you were talking about. It is the
    >> last line of Dialog.__init__.

    >
    > Yes. In the module "tkSimpleDialog"


    In 3.x, the module is now tk.simpledialog -- all lower case. The purpose
    of all lowercase module names is to avoid confusion with upper case
    class names.

    > the class "Dialog" is what i am
    > referring to. Sorry for the confusion.


    and there is also a SimpleDialog class.

    >
    >> It appears that the intention is that all
    >> configuration be done in the body and button_box methods which are
    >> called earlier.

    >
    > Yes exactly. And this works well most of the time. However there are
    > many times where you may want to create a dialog with say a Label. And
    > you do not want to hard code the string displayed on the label.
    > However you cannot change the string once you initialize the dialog
    > because it enters a "modal wait loop". So what i am proposing is that
    > we change tkSimpleDialog to be like any other modal dialogs out there.


    SimpleDialog has a go method. Dialog does not, but I see no reason (yet)
    why it could not.

    > We move the modal code into a show method and use the dialog like i
    > suggested. I can send you a patch if you would be interested.


    I saw that first and was puzzled what you were asking. Clearer now.

    > My patch
    > does break backward compatibility. However we can make it compatible
    > somehow. Or an alternative approach would be to create a new dialog
    > module and then depreciate tkSimpleDialog. Let me know on or off list
    > if you are interested.
    >
    >> As far as I know, anything contributed to the stdlib has been licensed
    >> by the author to be redistributed under the Python license and can be
    >> patched by the developers. (This is one reason for people to not
    >> contribute their code to the stdlib.)

    >
    > I don't understand what that means. Are you suggesting that
    > contributing code is bad?


    If you write code and want to keep absolute control over it -- the api,
    the doc, the coding style, and the test methods -- then yes it can be
    bad, especially for people who are not active core developers.
    Contributing can also be a great -- if the module already meets with
    approval or if one is flexible and wants the critical review and likely
    improvement and increased usage. It depends on one's goal in writing the
    code.

    --
    Terry Jan Reedy
    Terry Reedy, Jan 26, 2011
    #12
  13. Rikishi42

    rantingrick Guest

    On Jan 26, 2:11 am, Terry Reedy <> wrote:

    > In 3.x, the module is now tk.simpledialog -- all lower case. The purpose
    > of all lowercase module names is to avoid confusion with upper case
    > class names.


    Yes Terry, i found the new module and documented the bugs in a new
    thread. I am not sure if the bugs are still present in the current RC
    (Note: i have 3.1.1 installed) however i would bet they are. As soon
    as i can find the current source in svn i'll update the "bug thread".
    However i cannot find it. If you can give a link that would be great!
    rantingrick, Jan 26, 2011
    #13
  14. Rikishi42

    Bryan Guest

    On Jan 25, 5:02 pm, rantingrick <> wrote:
    > On Jan 25, 3:54 pm, Bryan <> wrote:
    > ... And you people wonder why i hate Tkinter!


    Honestly, I don't think anyone wonders why _you_ hate Tkinter, you've
    made that abundantly clear.
    Bryan, Jan 27, 2011
    #14
  15. On 1/25/11 3:02 PM, rantingrick wrote:
    > This is a major flaw in the design and i would be
    > happy to fix the flaw. However our "friend" Fredrick decided to
    > copyright the module to himself! What a jerk! Which is quite
    > disgusting considering that Tkinter, and TclTk are completely open
    > source!



    Uh. ... LOL.

    Copyright doesn't mean what you think it means.

    Tkinter is copyrighted. Python is copyrighted. Tcl/TK is copyrgithed.

    In fact: everything that is "open source" is copyrighted. By
    definition[* see footnote].

    Open source is simply copyrighted material that has been released under
    a *license* that allows you to copy it, too: sometimes with some
    significant catches (i.e., GPL), sometimes with basically no strings at
    all except not to sue (i.e., MIT).

    So.

    Its a major flaw? Well! Go fix it, you have every right to. Python's
    source is released under a rather liberal license, allowing you to do
    just about anything you want with it. Including fix it and even-- gasp--
    submit those fixes to the bug-tracker for inclusion.


    --

    Stephen Hansen
    ... Also: Ixokai
    ... Mail: me+list/python (AT) ixokai (DOT) io
    ... Blog: http://meh.ixokai.io/

    * Some software has no copyright, such as SQLITE: it has been released
    into the public domain. But that is exceedingly rare, and can be a bit
    complicated as public domain and its meaning varies from jurisdiction to
    jurisdiction. Whereas copyright is pretty standard across the board and
    subject to a whole lot of international treaties. I'm really not sure
    you can legitimately call public domain software open source: its free
    to use, modify, and do anything you want with (provided you're in a
    jurisdiction which recognizes public domain), but it has its own
    particular legal ... issues. Then again, IANAL.


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    Stephen Hansen, Jan 27, 2011
    #15
  16. On 2011-01-27, Stephen Hansen <me+list/> wrote:
    > On 1/25/11 3:02 PM, rantingrick wrote:
    >> This is a major flaw in the design and i would be
    >> happy to fix the flaw. However our "friend" Fredrick decided to
    >> copyright the module to himself! What a jerk! Which is quite
    >> disgusting considering that Tkinter, and TclTk are completely open
    >> source!

    >
    > Uh. ... LOL.
    >
    > Copyright doesn't mean what you think it means.
    >
    > Tkinter is copyrighted. Python is copyrighted. Tcl/TK is copyrgithed.
    >
    > In fact: everything that is "open source" is copyrighted. By
    > definition[* see footnote].


    One (domestic US) exception would be open-source software written by
    an employee of the US federal government. Works produced by the US
    Government are not copyrighted under US domestic copyright law. Such
    works are copyrighted under international law (which is probably what
    the Python maintainers care about).

    --
    Grant Edwards grant.b.edwards Yow! Wow! Look!! A stray
    at meatball!! Let's interview
    gmail.com it!
    Grant Edwards, Jan 27, 2011
    #16
  17. On 1/27/11 10:04 AM, Grant Edwards wrote:
    > On 2011-01-27, Stephen Hansen <me+list/> wrote:
    >> On 1/25/11 3:02 PM, rantingrick wrote:
    >>> This is a major flaw in the design and i would be
    >>> happy to fix the flaw. However our "friend" Fredrick decided to
    >>> copyright the module to himself! What a jerk! Which is quite
    >>> disgusting considering that Tkinter, and TclTk are completely open
    >>> source!

    >>
    >> Uh. ... LOL.
    >>
    >> Copyright doesn't mean what you think it means.
    >>
    >> Tkinter is copyrighted. Python is copyrighted. Tcl/TK is copyrgithed.
    >>
    >> In fact: everything that is "open source" is copyrighted. By
    >> definition[* see footnote].

    >
    > One (domestic US) exception would be open-source software written by
    > an employee of the US federal government. Works produced by the US
    > Government are not copyrighted under US domestic copyright law. Such
    > works are copyrighted under international law (which is probably what
    > the Python maintainers care about).


    I've actually wondered a bit about that: but the only open source
    software that I'm aware of that's been government-adjacent has ended up
    being written/owned by some University or joint venture funded by a
    government agency -- it didn't fall into the public domain category of
    content created directly by the federal government.

    Are you aware of any code out there that is? Just curious. I'm not
    arguing that the exception doesn't exist or anything.

    --

    Stephen Hansen
    ... Also: Ixokai
    ... Mail: me+list/python (AT) ixokai (DOT) io
    ... Blog: http://meh.ixokai.io/


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    Stephen Hansen, Jan 27, 2011
    #17
  18. On 2011-01-27, Stephen Hansen <me+list/> wrote:
    > On 1/27/11 10:04 AM, Grant Edwards wrote:
    >> On 2011-01-27, Stephen Hansen <me+list/> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In fact: everything that is "open source" is copyrighted. By
    >>> definition[* see footnote].

    >>
    >> One (domestic US) exception would be open-source software written by
    >> an employee of the US federal government. Works produced by the US
    >> Government are not copyrighted under US domestic copyright law. Such
    >> works are copyrighted under international law (which is probably what
    >> the Python maintainers care about).

    >
    > I've actually wondered a bit about that: but the only open source
    > software that I'm aware of that's been government-adjacent has ended
    > up being written/owned by some University or joint venture funded by
    > a government agency -- it didn't fall into the public domain category
    > of content created directly by the federal government.


    That seems to be the usual case.

    > Are you aware of any code out there that is? Just curious. I'm not
    > arguing that the exception doesn't exist or anything.


    No, I can't point to anything significant or recent. I have vague
    memories of stuff from a long time ago (back when open-source software
    travelled hand-to-hand on DECUS tapes) written by people at NOAA or
    USGS that was copyright-free.

    --
    Grant Edwards grant.b.edwards Yow! RELATIVES!!
    at
    gmail.com
    Grant Edwards, Jan 27, 2011
    #18
  19. Rikishi42

    Robert Kern Guest

    On 2011-01-27 12:18 , Stephen Hansen wrote:
    > On 1/27/11 10:04 AM, Grant Edwards wrote:
    >> On 2011-01-27, Stephen Hansen<me+list/> wrote:
    >>> On 1/25/11 3:02 PM, rantingrick wrote:
    >>>> This is a major flaw in the design and i would be
    >>>> happy to fix the flaw. However our "friend" Fredrick decided to
    >>>> copyright the module to himself! What a jerk! Which is quite
    >>>> disgusting considering that Tkinter, and TclTk are completely open
    >>>> source!
    >>>
    >>> Uh. ... LOL.
    >>>
    >>> Copyright doesn't mean what you think it means.
    >>>
    >>> Tkinter is copyrighted. Python is copyrighted. Tcl/TK is copyrgithed.
    >>>
    >>> In fact: everything that is "open source" is copyrighted. By
    >>> definition[* see footnote].

    >>
    >> One (domestic US) exception would be open-source software written by
    >> an employee of the US federal government. Works produced by the US
    >> Government are not copyrighted under US domestic copyright law. Such
    >> works are copyrighted under international law (which is probably what
    >> the Python maintainers care about).

    >
    > I've actually wondered a bit about that: but the only open source
    > software that I'm aware of that's been government-adjacent has ended up
    > being written/owned by some University or joint venture funded by a
    > government agency -- it didn't fall into the public domain category of
    > content created directly by the federal government.
    >
    > Are you aware of any code out there that is? Just curious. I'm not
    > arguing that the exception doesn't exist or anything.


    A lot of stuff from NIST is legitimately public domain. E.g.

    http://fingerprint.nist.gov/NFIS/

    --
    Robert Kern

    "I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma
    that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had
    an underlying truth."
    -- Umberto Eco
    Robert Kern, Jan 27, 2011
    #19
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