NetBeans 4.1 projects

Discussion in 'Java' started by Michael Preminger, Jun 21, 2005.

  1. Hello!

    I am planning to use NetBeans 4.1 in a Java course I'll be holding.

    As a normal course would, I start easy, with small programs, each
    demonstrating a basic feature / component of the language.

    NetBeans 4.1 has a default project structure that may be somewhat
    intimidating for a beginner. It is also quite a waste of space using an
    extensive directory hierarchy for a little source file of 3-4 code lines.

    In NB3.6 I could start by mounting a single directory, which both
    class-file and source file shared. Means that the complexity of the
    project could be adapted to the current stage of learning, evolving to
    more ccomplex "real life" structures as the course progressed.

    Any ideas on how I should go about with NB4.1?

    Thanks

    Michael
     
    Michael Preminger, Jun 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. Michael Preminger

    Eric Sosman Guest

    Michael Preminger wrote:
    > Hello!
    >
    > I am planning to use NetBeans 4.1 in a Java course I'll be holding.
    >
    > As a normal course would, I start easy, with small programs, each
    > demonstrating a basic feature / component of the language.
    >
    > NetBeans 4.1 has a default project structure that may be somewhat
    > intimidating for a beginner. It is also quite a waste of space using an
    > extensive directory hierarchy for a little source file of 3-4 code lines.
    >
    > In NB3.6 I could start by mounting a single directory, which both
    > class-file and source file shared. Means that the complexity of the
    > project could be adapted to the current stage of learning, evolving to
    > more ccomplex "real life" structures as the course progressed.
    >
    > Any ideas on how I should go about with NB4.1?


    It's your course and your call, but for files of
    "3-4 code lines" I'd suggest using no IDE at all. Start
    them on Java, plain and simple, and don't introduce an
    IDE until your students are writing code that could
    benefit from debuggers, profilers, and the other sorts
    of tools an IDE offers.

    Don't commit canaricide by cannon.

    --
     
    Eric Sosman, Jun 21, 2005
    #2
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  3. Eric Sosman wrote:
    >
    > Michael Preminger wrote:
    >
    >>Hello!
    >>
    >>I am planning to use NetBeans 4.1 in a Java course I'll be holding.
    >>
    >>As a normal course would, I start easy, with small programs, each
    >>demonstrating a basic feature / component of the language.
    >>
    >>NetBeans 4.1 has a default project structure that may be somewhat
    >>intimidating for a beginner. It is also quite a waste of space using an
    >>extensive directory hierarchy for a little source file of 3-4 code lines.
    >>
    >>In NB3.6 I could start by mounting a single directory, which both
    >>class-file and source file shared. Means that the complexity of the
    >>project could be adapted to the current stage of learning, evolving to
    >>more ccomplex "real life" structures as the course progressed.
    >>
    >>Any ideas on how I should go about with NB4.1?

    >
    >
    > It's your course and your call, but for files of
    > "3-4 code lines" I'd suggest using no IDE at all. Start
    > them on Java, plain and simple, and don't introduce an
    > IDE until your students are writing code that could
    > benefit from debuggers, profilers, and the other sorts
    > of tools an IDE offers.
    >
    > Don't commit canaricide by cannon.
    >

    Thanks!
    Ive taken a look at TextPad for that purpose, and even though there is
    some work to do installing a JDK, setting pathes and classpathes, and
    the like, it may seem like a better alternative than starting off with a
    heavy IDE.

    Michael
     
    Michael Preminger, Jun 21, 2005
    #3
  4. Michael Preminger

    IchBin Guest

    Michael Preminger wrote:
    > Eric Sosman wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Michael Preminger wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hello!
    >>>
    >>> I am planning to use NetBeans 4.1 in a Java course I'll be holding.
    >>>
    >>> As a normal course would, I start easy, with small programs, each
    >>> demonstrating a basic feature / component of the language.
    >>>
    >>> NetBeans 4.1 has a default project structure that may be somewhat
    >>> intimidating for a beginner. It is also quite a waste of space using an
    >>> extensive directory hierarchy for a little source file of 3-4 code
    >>> lines.
    >>>
    >>> In NB3.6 I could start by mounting a single directory, which both
    >>> class-file and source file shared. Means that the complexity of the
    >>> project could be adapted to the current stage of learning, evolving to
    >>> more ccomplex "real life" structures as the course progressed.
    >>>
    >>> Any ideas on how I should go about with NB4.1?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> It's your course and your call, but for files of
    >> "3-4 code lines" I'd suggest using no IDE at all. Start
    >> them on Java, plain and simple, and don't introduce an
    >> IDE until your students are writing code that could
    >> benefit from debuggers, profilers, and the other sorts
    >> of tools an IDE offers.
    >>
    >> Don't commit canaricide by cannon.
    >>

    > Thanks!
    > Ive taken a look at TextPad for that purpose, and even though there is
    > some work to do installing a JDK, setting pathes and classpathes, and
    > the like, it may seem like a better alternative than starting off with a
    > heavy IDE.
    >
    > Michael
    >
    >
    >

    Michael,

    You could use Eclipse IDE from http://www.eclipse.org/ This should meet
    all of your needs.

    If you do not want to use a professional IDE I would highly recommend
    JGRASP. Their home page is http://www.jgrasp.org/ This IDE comes from
    Academia from Auburn University. I use Eclipse 90 percent of the time
    but like to use JGRASP because of the small foot print that it has. I
    can even use it for my applications I have out on my website at
    http://weconsultants.servebeer.com

    If you want to teach Java in an OOP approach you could look at BlueJ
    from http://www.bluej.org/ This is also from Academia from the
    University of Kent, Deakin University, University of Southern Denmark.

    --


    Thanks in Advance...
    IchBin, Pocono Lake, Pa, USA
    __________________________________________________________________________

    ' If there is one, Knowledge is the "Fountain of Youth"'
    -William E. Taylor, Regular Guy (1952-)
     
    IchBin, Jun 21, 2005
    #4
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