netbeans

Discussion in 'Java' started by Loco Pollo, Jan 5, 2004.

  1. Loco Pollo

    Loco Pollo Guest

    i've just started learning java (mostly used VB til now).

    just wanted to get some personal opinions on the best tool. i've heard
    of symantec's java cafe and a couple of others but beans was free and
    so far it seems okay (tho nowhere as simple to learn and use as VB
    imho).

    any input would be appreciated.

    links to tutorials you found helpful would also be appreciated.
    Loco Pollo, Jan 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. Loco Pollo

    Kristoffel Guest

    Loco Pollo wrote:
    > i've just started learning java (mostly used VB til now).
    >
    > just wanted to get some personal opinions on the best tool. i've heard
    > of symantec's java cafe and a couple of others but beans was free and
    > so far it seems okay (tho nowhere as simple to learn and use as VB
    > imho).
    >
    > any input would be appreciated.
    >


    eclipse (http://www.eclipse.org) is also free, and it is very powerfull
    in combination with plugins like eclipseUML.
    Kristoffel, Jan 5, 2004
    #2
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  3. Loco Pollo

    Tim Ward Guest

    "Loco Pollo" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > i've just started learning java (mostly used VB til now).
    >
    > just wanted to get some personal opinions on the best tool. i've heard
    > of symantec's java cafe and a couple of others but beans was free and
    > so far it seems okay (tho nowhere as simple to learn and use as VB
    > imho).
    >
    > any input would be appreciated.


    If you're used to VB you'll find Netbeans slow and buggy and lacking obvious
    features. And slow. And also it's not very fast.

    --
    Tim Ward
    Brett Ward Limited - www.brettward.co.uk
    Tim Ward, Jan 6, 2004
    #3
  4. (Loco Pollo) wrote in message news:<>...
    > i've just started learning java (mostly used VB til now).
    >
    > just wanted to get some personal opinions on the best tool. i've heard
    > of symantec's java cafe and a couple of others but beans was free and
    > so far it seems okay (tho nowhere as simple to learn and use as VB
    > imho).
    >
    > any input would be appreciated.
    >
    > links to tutorials you found helpful would also be appreciated.


    Borland JBuilder is a very user friendly IDE, and I believe the
    Personal Edition is free.
    Karl von Laudermann, Jan 6, 2004
    #4
  5. Loco Pollo

    David Segall Guest

    (Loco Pollo) wrote:

    >i've just started learning java (mostly used VB til now).
    >
    >just wanted to get some personal opinions on the best tool. i've heard
    >of symantec's java cafe and a couple of others but beans was free and
    >so far it seems okay (tho nowhere as simple to learn and use as VB
    >imho).
    >
    >any input would be appreciated.

    I also came to Java from VB and was disconcerted by having a choice of
    IDE's. Because of my VB background I insisted on a "what you see is
    what you get" editor for graphical user interface development.

    I settled on Netbeans (www.netbeans.org) because it is free and Open
    Source. NetBeans also provides the beans for you to use if your own
    application is similar to an IDE. I bought the excellent
    reference/tutorial (http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/netbeans/) but the
    "beta version" is available for free download from
    http://www.netbeans.org/download/books/definitive-guide/index.html.

    Borland JBuilder Foundation
    (http://www.borland.com/jbuilder/foundation/) is also a free download.
    It is the entry level JBuilder but it is probably the closest to
    Visual Basic so it may be easier to learn than NetBeans. Oracle's
    JDeveloper (http://otn.oracle.com/products/jdev/content.html) is a
    free download but the license severely restricts what you can do with
    programs you write if you do not pay for it. JDeveloper would win on a
    feature comparison and it may be the best choice if you are learning
    "enterprise level" Java. It comes with some data bound widgets similar
    to those available in VB.

    There are two other IDE's that I should mention because they have
    passionate proponents in this group and I may save them the trouble of
    a follow up.

    Eclipse (www.eclipse.org) is popular and Open Source but does not have
    a built-in GUI builder. There are free plug-ins like
    http://www.assisiplugins.com/index_start.html and
    http://www.eclipse.org/vep/ for the purpose but I don't think they are
    ready yet. IBM's Websphere Studio Application Developer
    (http://www-3.ibm.com/software/awdtools/studioappdev/), which is based
    on Eclipse, fixes the problem. Websphere is not free but a sixty day
    trial is available.

    Intellij Idea (http://www.intellij.com/idea/) is not free and does not
    have a GUI developer although they are promising one in the next
    version. It is much loved by many capable Java developers who say that
    it is simple, fast and provides all the features they need in an IDE.
    >
    >links to tutorials you found helpful would also be appreciated.

    If you are writing GUIs then you probably need to learn Swing. I found
    Swing Second Edition (http://www.manning.com/robinson2/) very useful
    and I prefer to have it as a book. Manning seem to have removed the
    free download of the first edition from their web site but it is still
    available from http://custom.lab.unb.br/pub/books/manning.com/sbe/.

    I have not tried it but Sun offers free web based training for Sun One
    Studio 4 Comunity Edition
    (http://training.sun.com/US/catalog/web_based/wlcsundev_live.html).
    Sun One is based on, and very similar to, NetBeans. Studio 4 CE is
    free and can be downloaded from
    http://jsecom16d.sun.com/ECom/EComA...I9-401-TL9M&TransactionId=try&LMLoadBalanced=.
    It has been superseded by Studio 5.
    David Segall, Jan 6, 2004
    #5
  6. Loco Pollo

    Loco Pollo Guest

    "Tim Ward" <> wrote in message news:<bte0ui$6547g$-berlin.de>...
    > "Loco Pollo" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > i've just started learning java (mostly used VB til now).
    > >
    > > just wanted to get some personal opinions on the best tool. i've heard
    > > of symantec's java cafe and a couple of others but beans was free and
    > > so far it seems okay (tho nowhere as simple to learn and use as VB
    > > imho).
    > >
    > > any input would be appreciated.

    >
    > If you're used to VB you'll find Netbeans slow and buggy and lacking obvious
    > features. And slow. And also it's not very fast.


    yeah i agree but.. threading + cross platform compatibility. VB rocks
    for makin stuff fast quick and easy but it's limitations are gettin to
    me.
    Loco Pollo, Jan 6, 2004
    #6
  7. Loco Pollo

    Loco Pollo Guest

    Kristoffel <> wrote in message news:<g3kKb.116758$-ops.be>...
    > Loco Pollo wrote:
    > > i've just started learning java (mostly used VB til now).
    > >
    > > just wanted to get some personal opinions on the best tool. i've heard
    > > of symantec's java cafe and a couple of others but beans was free and
    > > so far it seems okay (tho nowhere as simple to learn and use as VB
    > > imho).
    > >
    > > any input would be appreciated.
    > >

    >
    > eclipse (http://www.eclipse.org) is also free, and it is very powerfull
    > in combination with plugins like eclipseUML.


    so whats the run down on the most popular java developement
    environment? what do most people use?
    Loco Pollo, Jan 6, 2004
    #7
  8. Loco Pollo

    Loco Pollo Guest

    exactly what i was lookin for on a silver platter. thanx!!!

    David Segall <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > (Loco Pollo) wrote:
    >
    > >i've just started learning java (mostly used VB til now).
    > >
    > >just wanted to get some personal opinions on the best tool. i've heard
    > >of symantec's java cafe and a couple of others but beans was free and
    > >so far it seems okay (tho nowhere as simple to learn and use as VB
    > >imho).
    > >
    > >any input would be appreciated.

    > I also came to Java from VB and was disconcerted by having a choice of
    > IDE's. Because of my VB background I insisted on a "what you see is
    > what you get" editor for graphical user interface development.
    >
    > I settled on Netbeans (www.netbeans.org) because it is free and Open
    > Source. NetBeans also provides the beans for you to use if your own
    > application is similar to an IDE. I bought the excellent
    > reference/tutorial (http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/netbeans/) but the
    > "beta version" is available for free download from
    > http://www.netbeans.org/download/books/definitive-guide/index.html.
    >
    > Borland JBuilder Foundation
    > (http://www.borland.com/jbuilder/foundation/) is also a free download.
    > It is the entry level JBuilder but it is probably the closest to
    > Visual Basic so it may be easier to learn than NetBeans. Oracle's
    > JDeveloper (http://otn.oracle.com/products/jdev/content.html) is a
    > free download but the license severely restricts what you can do with
    > programs you write if you do not pay for it. JDeveloper would win on a
    > feature comparison and it may be the best choice if you are learning
    > "enterprise level" Java. It comes with some data bound widgets similar
    > to those available in VB.
    >
    > There are two other IDE's that I should mention because they have
    > passionate proponents in this group and I may save them the trouble of
    > a follow up.
    >
    > Eclipse (www.eclipse.org) is popular and Open Source but does not have
    > a built-in GUI builder. There are free plug-ins like
    > http://www.assisiplugins.com/index_start.html and
    > http://www.eclipse.org/vep/ for the purpose but I don't think they are
    > ready yet. IBM's Websphere Studio Application Developer
    > (http://www-3.ibm.com/software/awdtools/studioappdev/), which is based
    > on Eclipse, fixes the problem. Websphere is not free but a sixty day
    > trial is available.
    >
    > Intellij Idea (http://www.intellij.com/idea/) is not free and does not
    > have a GUI developer although they are promising one in the next
    > version. It is much loved by many capable Java developers who say that
    > it is simple, fast and provides all the features they need in an IDE.
    > >
    > >links to tutorials you found helpful would also be appreciated.

    > If you are writing GUIs then you probably need to learn Swing. I found
    > Swing Second Edition (http://www.manning.com/robinson2/) very useful
    > and I prefer to have it as a book. Manning seem to have removed the
    > free download of the first edition from their web site but it is still
    > available from http://custom.lab.unb.br/pub/books/manning.com/sbe/.
    >
    > I have not tried it but Sun offers free web based training for Sun One
    > Studio 4 Comunity Edition
    > (http://training.sun.com/US/catalog/web_based/wlcsundev_live.html).
    > Sun One is based on, and very similar to, NetBeans. Studio 4 CE is
    > free and can be downloaded from
    > http://jsecom16d.sun.com/ECom/EComA...I9-401-TL9M&TransactionId=try&LMLoadBalanced=.
    > It has been superseded by Studio 5.
    Loco Pollo, Jan 7, 2004
    #8
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