New Arrival to Python

Discussion in 'Python' started by Norm Goertzen, Aug 25, 2005.

  1. Hi Everyone,

    I'm totally captivated by Python so far. I want to develop
    professional-looking Win32 applications with the least effort.

    I have many years experience with PowerBuilder, PowerBuilder Foundation
    Class, and SQL Anywhere. I would really like to leverage as many of
    these skills as possible.

    Recently I've been learning C#.NET but am concerned with the anticipated
    longer development times.

    If it matters, the IDE I choose should also allow for simpler web
    development.

    thanks in advance, Norm


    QUESTIONS:

    1. What IDE should I use?

    2. If Wing IDE is really good, which version Professional or Personal?

    3. Can Sybase's SQL Anywhere Studio be fully integrated with Python?

    4. How about versions that integrate with MicroSoft's Visual Studio.
    Are they generally considered a smart idea?

    5. How does Python compare to PowerBuilder's DATAWINDOW technology?

    6. What books are worthwhile?

    My O'Reilly's Safari network has these books:

    -Core Python Programming; Wesley J. Chun
    -Python Developer's Handbook; André Dos Santos Lessa
    -Python Essential Reference, Second Edition; David M Beazley
    -Perl To Python Migration; Martin C. Brown
    -Programming Python, 2nd Edition; Mark Lutz
    -Python Standard Library; Fredrik Lundh
    -Python & XML; Fred L. Drake, Jr., Christopher A. Jones
    -Python Cookbook; Alex Martelli, David Ascher
    -Python Pocket Reference, 2nd Edition; Mark Lutz
    -Learning Python; David Ascher, Mark Lutz
    -Python Pocket Reference; Mark Lutz
    -Python Programming on Win32; Mark Hammond, Andy Robinson
    -Python: Visual QuickStart Guide; Chris Fehily
    -Python Programming with the Java™ Class Libraries: A Tutorial for
    Building Web and Enterprise Applications with Jython; Richard Hightower
    -Python in a Nutshell; Alex Martelli
    -Text Processing in Python; David Mertz
    -Learning Python, 2nd Edition; David Ascher, Mark Lutz
    -Game Programming with Python, Lua, and Ruby; Tom Gutschmidt
    -Python Programming for the absolute beginner; MICHAEL DAWSON
    -Python Cookbook, 2nd Edition; David Ascher, Alex Martelli, Anna Ravenscroft
    Norm Goertzen, Aug 25, 2005
    #1
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  2. Norm Goertzen wrote:

    I can just answer about books:

    > -Programming Python, 2nd Edition; Mark Lutz

    Quite good. Exhaustive and authoritative. The 1st edition was questionable
    but the second one is very fine.

    > -Python Standard Library; Fredrik Lundh

    Quite a need for a beginner. The HTML docu of Python is huge and a little
    bit confusing at first. This book can avoid you a lot of search-and-read
    work.

    > -Python & XML; Fred L. Drake, Jr., Christopher A. Jones

    Required if you plan to work with XML. (there are other books regarding this
    topic, anyway)

    > -Python Cookbook; Alex Martelli, David Ascher

    The most useful book after your first week of real work with python.

    > -Learning Python, 2nd Edition; David Ascher, Mark Lutz

    Excellent primer. Probably too elementar for a professional programmer.

    > -Python Programming on Win32; Mark Hammond, Andy Robinson

    Excellent book for Windows users. Exhaustive and clear.

    > -Text Processing in Python; David Mertz

    Very interesting book on a very common programming task. Read it if you have
    time.

    > -Python Cookbook, 2nd Edition; David Ascher, Alex Martelli, Anna
    > Ravenscroft

    I have the 1st edition and it is very fine. The second one can just be
    better.

    HTH

    -----------------------------------
    Alessandro Bottoni
    Alessandro Bottoni, Aug 25, 2005
    #2
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  3. Norm Goertzen

    Guest

    I have been using Eclispe IDE with the PyDev plugin for Python
    Development.
    it allow you to set up projects. you can use PyAnt to build them.
    It works great for me. It's free an easy to use.
    Eclipse is at http://www.eclipse.org


    There is also Emacs with the python plugin



    Rob M.
    python project - http://pamie.sourceforge.net
    , Aug 25, 2005
    #3
  4. Windows Apps:
    Since you said "professional looking" applications, I assume you mean
    graphical interfaces (windows - GUI):
    If so, I recomend PythonCard ( http://pythoncard.sourceforge.net/ ).
    It is very easy to use, very similar to Visual Basic or Delphi (drag
    and drop widgets on a form...).

    Web Development:
    An excellent choice for simple (and complex, but easy) web development
    in Python is Karrigell ( http://pythoncard.sourceforge.net/ ). It is
    not an IDE, but a web framework. The coding can de made with the
    standard IDLE or simply notepad.

    Books:
    Learning Python 2nd Edition. Very good and complete introduction to
    python.

    Online resources:
    A byte of Python (google this)
    Dive into Python (for more experienced programmers)

    Hope this helps...
    Luis
    Luis M. Gonzalez, Aug 25, 2005
    #4
  5. Windows Apps:
    Since you said "professional looking" applications, I assume you mean
    graphical interfaces (windows - GUI):
    If so, I recomend PythonCard ( http://pythoncard.sourceforge. net/ ).
    It is very easy to use, very similar to Visual Basic or Delphi (drag
    and drop widgets on a form...).

    Web Development:
    An excellent choice for simple (and complex, but easy) web development
    in Python is Karrigell ( http://karrigell.sourceforge. net/ ). It is
    not an IDE, but a web framework. The coding can de made with the
    standard IDLE or simply notepad.

    Books:
    Learning Python 2nd Edition. Very good and complete introduction to
    python.

    Online resources:
    A byte of Python (google this)
    Dive into Python (for more experienced programmers)

    Hope this helps...
    Luis
    Luis M. Gonzalez, Aug 25, 2005
    #5
  6. Norm Goertzen

    Guest

    1. Whichever one works best for you, of course. :) There are lots of
    editors and IDEs out there. I find myself coming back to Emacs and
    jEdit the most, but there are a sizable number of vi partisans
    (benighted heathens tho they be) and an increasing number of Eclipse,
    Wing and Komodo partisans. Having tried all the free ones I could get
    my mitts on... well, Emacs and jEdit serve my needs just fine. Your
    mileage may vary significantly.

    2-5 are all either IDE opinion questions, which I'll duck, or specific
    technologies I don't use, which I'll duck. Resuming with 6...

    _Core Python Programming_ is a reasonable read for a beginner. I
    prefer Mark Lutz's _Programming Python_ 2nd Ed, though. _Learning
    Python_ is also a good choice, but only for real beginners to
    programming--if you already know a programming language, _Programming
    Python_ is the better choice.

    I use Beazley's _Python Essential Reference_ about once every couple of
    days. Surprisingly, I use it more than _Python in a Nutshell_, but
    that may be due more to the fact _PER_ is usually within closer reach.
    They're both good references, with _PiaN_ being more heavyweight with
    better coverage.

    The _Python Cookbook_ is a great way to expand your knowledge of Python
    and discover the weird and cool stuff you can do with it.
    , Aug 25, 2005
    #6
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