New developer

Discussion in 'C++' started by Fao, Sean, Apr 27, 2004.

  1. Fao, Sean

    Fao, Sean Guest

    > I am a Java/C#/Flash developer with experience witth WebSphere, WebSphere
    > Portal, DB2, J2SE, J2EE, IIS6 and several other technologies. I want to
    > pick up C or C++ to add another tool to the belt. I am concerned on which to
    > begin with, C or C++. I am familiar with the OO concepts from my Java
    > experience, and I came from a VB6 background as well so I have done
    > procedural development also.
    >
    > Where should I start? Do I need to learn C or C++ since I already know C#
    > and Java. Seems to me that there are no real benfits for me to learn a C
    > language because I already have C# on the Win platform and Java for all
    > platofrms.


    Personally, I would recommend you start with C (actually, I recommend
    everybody start with Assembly but that's another story). If you're a
    C#/Java programmer, you haven't worked with pointers yet. You can't
    learn pointers overnight, either. Start from the ground and work your
    way up. Besides, C is a great language and still very heavily used. In
    addition, contrary to many peoples belief, C++ is not a "new and
    improved" C. You will find learning C easy in some aspects because you
    already know the other two languages.

    Good luck,

    Sean
     
    Fao, Sean, Apr 27, 2004
    #1
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  2. Fao, Sean

    Jeff Schwab Guest

    John wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    >
    > I am a Java/C#/Flash developer with experience witth WebSphere, WebSphere
    > Portal, DB2, J2SE, J2EE, IIS6 and several other technologies. I want to
    > pick up C or C++ to add another tool to the belt. I am concerned on which to
    > begin with, C or C++. I am familiar with the OO concepts from my Java
    > experience, and I came from a VB6 background as well so I have done
    > procedural development also.
    >
    > Where should I start? Do I need to learn C or C++ since I already know C#
    > and Java. Seems to me that there are no real benfits for me to learn a C
    > language because I already have C# on the Win platform and Java for all
    > platofrms.


    You don't need to learn C first. Read _Accelerated C++_ by Koenig &
    Moo. Good luck, and welcome!
     
    Jeff Schwab, Apr 28, 2004
    #2
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  3. Fao, Sean

    John Guest

    Hello,


    I am a Java/C#/Flash developer with experience witth WebSphere, WebSphere
    Portal, DB2, J2SE, J2EE, IIS6 and several other technologies. I want to
    pick up C or C++ to add another tool to the belt. I am concerned on which to
    begin with, C or C++. I am familiar with the OO concepts from my Java
    experience, and I came from a VB6 background as well so I have done
    procedural development also.

    Where should I start? Do I need to learn C or C++ since I already know C#
    and Java. Seems to me that there are no real benfits for me to learn a C
    language because I already have C# on the Win platform and Java for all
    platofrms.

    Help!!


    TIA

    -john
     
    John, Apr 28, 2004
    #3
  4. "John" <> wrote in message
    news:Z8Bjc.44295$...
    > Hello,
    >
    >
    > I am a Java/C#/Flash developer with experience witth WebSphere, WebSphere
    > Portal, DB2, J2SE, J2EE, IIS6 and several other technologies. I want to
    > pick up C or C++ to add another tool to the belt. I am concerned on which

    to
    > begin with, C or C++. I am familiar with the OO concepts from my Java
    > experience, and I came from a VB6 background as well so I have done
    > procedural development also.
    >
    > Where should I start? Do I need to learn C or C++ since I already know C#
    > and Java. Seems to me that there are no real benfits for me to learn a C
    > language because I already have C# on the Win platform and Java for all
    > platofrms.
    >
    > Help!!
    >


    Well there you have it, two completely contradictory opinions. Neither is
    definitive of course, but given your background I'd strongly recommend
    Jeff's suggestion, read Accelerated C++.

    But either way you are going to have to get your head round some unfamiliar
    concepts, C++ and Java are very, very different, even though both claim to
    be object oriented.

    john
     
    John Harrison, Apr 28, 2004
    #4
  5. Fao, Sean

    Dave Moore Guest

    "Fao, Sean" <-WANT-NO-SPAM> wrote in message news:<>...
    > > I am a Java/C#/Flash developer with experience witth WebSphere, WebSphere
    > > Portal, DB2, J2SE, J2EE, IIS6 and several other technologies. I want to
    > > pick up C or C++ to add another tool to the belt. I am concerned on which to
    > > begin with, C or C++. I am familiar with the OO concepts from my Java
    > > experience, and I came from a VB6 background as well so I have done
    > > procedural development also.
    > >
    > > Where should I start? Do I need to learn C or C++ since I already know C#
    > > and Java. Seems to me that there are no real benfits for me to learn a C
    > > language because I already have C# on the Win platform and Java for all
    > > platofrms.

    >
    > Personally, I would recommend you start with C (actually, I recommend
    > everybody start with Assembly but that's another story). If you're a
    > C#/Java programmer, you haven't worked with pointers yet. You can't
    > learn pointers overnight, either. Start from the ground and work your
    > way up. Besides, C is a great language and still very heavily used. In
    > addition, contrary to many peoples belief, C++ is not a "new and
    > improved" C. You will find learning C easy in some aspects because you
    > already know the other two languages.
    >


    Considering the above was posted *only* to a C++ specific newsgroup, I
    supposed it is what is refered to as a troll, but I'll bite anyway.

    C++ is not better or worse than C per se, but I think it is a *much*
    easier language to learn. The high-level facilities and type-safety
    (relative to C anyway) generally make designing and writing workable
    code much easier than the same in C. C is much lower level which
    typically means you must keep your eye on the small details even when
    writing code that is conceptually more abstract. That said, I expect
    there are applications for which C is a better choice .. just none
    that I am familiar with personally.

    HTH, Dave Moore
     
    Dave Moore, Apr 28, 2004
    #5
  6. Fao, Sean

    JKop Guest

    John posted:

    > Hello,
    >
    >
    > I am a Java/C#/Flash developer with experience witth WebSphere,
    > WebSphere Portal, DB2, J2SE, J2EE, IIS6 and several other
    > technologies. I want to pick up C or C++ to add another tool to the
    > belt. I am concerned on which to begin with, C or C++. I am familiar
    > with the OO concepts from my Java experience, and I came from a VB6
    > background as well so I have done procedural development also.
    >
    > Where should I start? Do I need to learn C or C++ since I already know
    > C# and Java. Seems to me that there are no real benfits for me to learn
    > a C language because I already have C# on the Win platform and Java for
    > all platofrms.
    >
    > Help!!
    >
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > -john



    I myself treat C++ as an independant language. I have no concern for C, it
    is an extinct language in my opinion that has been supersceeded by C++.

    People say that C is more "low-level". C++ is the C programming language
    with extra stuff added. It keeps the syntax, it keeps the keywords, adds
    more keywords, adds more functionality. For example, everything that can be
    done in C++ can be done in C, but it's allot more tedious. Similarly, in
    languages without polymorphism, you _can_ still use polymorphism, as
    follows:

    class Hjk
    {
    ...
    int (*Hello)(char*);
    ...
    }


    C++ just deals with the tedious pointers in the background so that you can
    move on and produce some real code.


    I challenge someone to produce a C program with better performance than a
    C++ program. They should perform exactly the same. C is definitely not more
    "low-level" than C++.

    In my own opinion, learning C right now before learning C++ would be like
    learning to drive a 1950s car before you hop into your new benz. What's the
    point?!


    -JKop
     
    JKop, Apr 28, 2004
    #6
  7. Fao, Sean

    Default User Guest

    JKop wrote:

    > I myself treat C++ as an independant language. I have no concern for C, it
    > is an extinct language in my opinion that has been supersceeded by C++.



    Considering your lack of skill with C++, your opinion counts for little.



    Brian Rodenborn
     
    Default User, Apr 28, 2004
    #7
  8. Fao, Sean

    JKop Guest

    Default User posted:

    > JKop wrote:
    >
    >> I myself treat C++ as an independant language. I have no concern for
    >> C, it is an extinct language in my opinion that has been supersceeded
    >> by C++.

    >
    >
    > Considering your lack of skill with C++, your opinion counts for
    > little.
    >
    >
    >
    > Brian Rodenborn



    My lack of skill with C++?


    Would you like to fabricate a few more stories there?
     
    JKop, Apr 29, 2004
    #8
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