Newbie question - Development environment (IDE)

Discussion in 'Java' started by Martin Wildam, Oct 21, 2003.

  1. Hi folks,

    I am new to java. I am thinking of switching to java because of
    multiplatform support and I am currently on Windows with VB. I also did some
    Javascripting within some ASP pages and I have rusty memories about Pascal
    and C++ from my MS DOS times. But in the last years I focused on VB. So far
    the introduction.

    I am a little confused about what is the difference between Java and J2EE,
    JSP, JavaBeans, JavaApplets, Servelets and some other keywords that you face
    when looking around about Java. However, I would need Java for Client
    applications, server side services for scripting and web applications. As I
    am not satisfied with the evolution of the .NET (apart that it keeps me
    dependent on Microsoft Windows platform) I guess I am better with Java,
    correct?

    I have seen some development environments (IDE) yet (like NetBeans and
    Eclipse), but talking with other guys I always hear new names so I decided
    to ask here at the newsgroup what would be the best thing to use. I am sure
    that it depends even on personal preferences but I would really be glad to
    hear/read your opinions. It would be a good orientation for me. So please
    tell me, what you prefer and why?

    Thanks a lot in advantage for all who give an idea,

    Martin.

    --
    _______________________________________
    Martin Wildam

    mailto:
    http://www.may.co.at
     
    Martin Wildam, Oct 21, 2003
    #1
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  2. Martin Wildam wrote:

    > Hi folks,


    [Group: Hi Martin!]

    [...]

    > I am a little confused about what is the difference between Java and J2EE,
    > JSP, JavaBeans, JavaApplets, Servelets and some other keywords that you face
    > when looking around about Java.


    Except for Java itself, all those are names of Java-based technologies
    designed for developing software in specific application domains.

    > However, I would need Java for Client
    > applications, server side services for scripting and web applications.


    Of the above-mentioned technologies, for server-side scripting and
    related kinds of work you would probably be looking at JSP and/or
    servlets, with the former being a friendly face on top of the latter
    that provides a programming paradigm more like some other server-side
    scripting technologies such as PHP or ASP.

    For client-side applications you'll likely want straight Java, and
    perhaps applets if you are writing web applications.

    Don't worry too much about JavaBeans -- you'll probably end up using
    them without realizing it, and the details aren't too hard to pick up.

    > As I
    > am not satisfied with the evolution of the .NET (apart that it keeps me
    > dependent on Microsoft Windows platform) I guess I am better with Java,
    > correct?


    Java is the most prevalent general-purpose alternative to .NET. Java
    can help minimize portability problems.

    > I have seen some development environments (IDE) yet (like NetBeans and
    > Eclipse), but talking with other guys I always hear new names so I decided
    > to ask here at the newsgroup what would be the best thing to use. I am sure
    > that it depends even on personal preferences but I would really be glad to
    > hear/read your opinions. It would be a good orientation for me. So please
    > tell me, what you prefer and why?


    While you are first learning Java I recommend that you rely on your
    trusty text editor and the command-line compiler. A number of us around
    here still use that combination, for that matter. A text editor with
    syntax highlighting for Java is useful but not essential. (Many are
    available.) An IDE gives you a lot more to learn (the IDE itself) and
    can also obscure some of the details of the language by taking care of
    them for you.

    When I do use an IDE it is Eclipse, in part because of the excellent
    refactoring support, in part because of the highly extensible
    architecture, and in part because I just like it.


    John Bollinger
     
    John C. Bollinger, Oct 21, 2003
    #2
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  3. > > I have seen some development environments (IDE) yet (like NetBeans and
    > > Eclipse), but talking with other guys I always hear new names so I

    decided
    > > to ask here at the newsgroup what would be the best thing to use. I am

    sure
    > > that it depends even on personal preferences but I would really be glad

    to
    > > hear/read your opinions. It would be a good orientation for me. So

    please
    > > tell me, what you prefer and why?

    >
    > While you are first learning Java I recommend that you rely on your
    > trusty text editor and the command-line compiler. A number of us around
    > here still use that combination, for that matter. A text editor with
    > syntax highlighting for Java is useful but not essential. (Many are
    > available.) An IDE gives you a lot more to learn (the IDE itself) and
    > can also obscure some of the details of the language by taking care of
    > them for you.
    >
    > When I do use an IDE it is Eclipse, in part because of the excellent
    > refactoring support, in part because of the highly extensible
    > architecture, and in part because I just like it.


    Thank you for your input. I have seen Eclipse already and I also found it
    quite ok. I know the text editor work also from doing VBScript, HTML,
    JavaScript etc. but an IDE would help me in debugging first because at the
    beginning I will do a lot of mistakes and with a Debugger I will figure out
    my errors more quickly.
     
    Martin Wildam, Oct 22, 2003
    #3
  4. "John C. Bollinger" <> wrote in message news:<bn4875$lvf$>...
    > Martin Wildam wrote:
    >
    >
    > > I have seen some development environments (IDE) yet (like NetBeans and
    > > Eclipse), but talking with other guys I always hear new names so I decided
    > > to ask here at the newsgroup what would be the best thing to use.

    >
    > While you are first learning Java I recommend that you rely on your
    > trusty text editor and the command-line compiler...
    > An IDE gives you a lot more to learn (the IDE itself) and
    > can also obscure some of the details of the language by taking care of
    > them for you.


    My feeling as well though DrJava (http://drjava.sourceforge.net/) has a
    lot of nice features for beginners, including a "test out some
    Java code" console window and integrated JUnit support, and set
    up went quite smoothly for me.

    > When I do use an IDE it is Eclipse, in part because of the excellent
    > refactoring support, in part because of the highly extensible
    > architecture, and in part because I just like it.


    DrJava has a prototype Eclipse plugin to ease the transition
    but I've not tried it.
     
    Chris Riesbeck, Oct 22, 2003
    #4
  5. Martin Wildam

    shay Guest

    Since you are coming from a VB background I would suggest that you
    take a look at Oracle JDeveloper as an IDE since it will give you
    visual development (and not just a code editor) for both Applets and
    Applications using Swing and JSP HTML applications.

    You get a visual editor where you can drag and drop visual components
    and easily bind them to the database.

    Check it out at http://otn.oracle.com/products/jdev where you can see
    some demos and download the full version.
     
    shay, Oct 23, 2003
    #5
  6. Martin Wildam

    Jonathan Guest

    Hi,

    I personaly suggest you to use Java. I really like it, I just came here
    because I'm converting my site to Java and I have a question, but I used it
    at my job and it's very powerful. If you want to understand all the terms
    and know a lot about Java, I really suggest you to take the time to pass
    through the J2EE tutorial . J2EE is for Java 2 Enterprise Edition, it
    includes JSP, Servlets, Enteprise bean, xml files, database connections, ...
    a lot of exercices and descriptions. All that is totally free on the
    www.java.sun.com .

    Have a nice day,

    Jonathan

    "Martin Wildam" <> wrote in message
    news:bn45bd$tgc6h$-berlin.de...
    > Hi folks,
    >
    > I am new to java. I am thinking of switching to java because of
    > multiplatform support and I am currently on Windows with VB. I also did

    some
    > Javascripting within some ASP pages and I have rusty memories about Pascal
    > and C++ from my MS DOS times. But in the last years I focused on VB. So

    far
    > the introduction.
    >
    > I am a little confused about what is the difference between Java and J2EE,
    > JSP, JavaBeans, JavaApplets, Servelets and some other keywords that you

    face
    > when looking around about Java. However, I would need Java for Client
    > applications, server side services for scripting and web applications. As

    I
    > am not satisfied with the evolution of the .NET (apart that it keeps me
    > dependent on Microsoft Windows platform) I guess I am better with Java,
    > correct?
    >
    > I have seen some development environments (IDE) yet (like NetBeans and
    > Eclipse), but talking with other guys I always hear new names so I decided
    > to ask here at the newsgroup what would be the best thing to use. I am

    sure
    > that it depends even on personal preferences but I would really be glad to
    > hear/read your opinions. It would be a good orientation for me. So please
    > tell me, what you prefer and why?
    >
    > Thanks a lot in advantage for all who give an idea,
    >
    > Martin.
    >
    > --
    > _______________________________________
    > Martin Wildam
    >
    > mailto:
    > http://www.may.co.at
    >
    >
     
    Jonathan, Oct 23, 2003
    #6
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