Newbie wants to self-taught java

Discussion in 'Java' started by fasisi, Nov 30, 2007.

  1. fasisi

    fasisi Guest

    Hello,

    I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    on each level of my learning java?

    Thank you
    fasisi, Nov 30, 2007
    #1
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  2. fasisi

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Thu, 29 Nov 2007 19:49:58 -0800 (PST), fasisi
    <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone
    who said :

    >I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    >on each level of my learning java?


    see http://mindprod.com/project/projects.html
    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
    The Java Glossary
    http://mindprod.com
    Roedy Green, Nov 30, 2007
    #2
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  3. fasisi

    mich Guest

    "fasisi" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    > on each level of my learning java?



    Why do you want to learn java? Is it just to learn it or is there some
    employment objective? What type of employment are you interested in?
    mich, Nov 30, 2007
    #3
  4. fasisi

    Mark Space Guest

    fasisi wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    > on each level of my learning java?
    >
    > Thank you



    http://www.javapassion.com/javaintro/

    Start at the beginning and do each lab project and homework. That'll
    get you started.

    Note that the class is already underway. You should probably save any
    homeworks you do rather than turn them in.
    Mark Space, Nov 30, 2007
    #4
  5. fasisi

    fasisi Guest

    On Dec 1, 12:05 am, "mich" <> wrote:
    > "fasisi" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > Hello,

    >
    > > I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    > > on each level of my learning java?

    >
    > Why do you want to learn java? Is it just to learn it or is there some
    > employment objective? What type of employment are you interested in?


    I want to learn Java to make money. I am thinking to sell software.
    fasisi, Dec 3, 2007
    #5
  6. On Nov 29, 11:49 pm, fasisi <> wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    > on each level of my learning java?
    >
    > Thank you


    There is an award winning book: "Thinking in Java". Remarkably, you
    can get it for free on the net.

    I would recommend to start with NetBeans, specially if you are used to
    MSVS, because it is very easy. Then, you will want more and naturally
    migrate to Eclipse, the best IDE ever written.

    If you are going to use a GUI Builder, don't bother with Matisse.
    There is a much better one (bidirectional), an Eclipse plugin.

    -Ramon
    Ramon F Herrera, Dec 3, 2007
    #6
  7. fasisi

    fasisi Guest

    On Dec 1, 4:45 am, Mark Space <> wrote:
    > fasisi wrote:
    > > Hello,

    >
    > > I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    > > on each level of my learning java?

    >
    > > Thank you

    >
    > http://www.javapassion.com/javaintro/
    >
    > Start at the beginning and do each lab project and homework. That'll
    > get you started.
    >
    > Note that the class is already underway. You should probably save any
    > homeworks you do rather than turn them in.


    Thank you for your advice. I have checked the source and it is good.
    Thank you.
    fasisi, Dec 3, 2007
    #7
  8. fasisi

    fasisi Guest

    On Nov 30, 2:44 pm, Roedy Green <>
    wrote:
    > On Thu, 29 Nov 2007 19:49:58 -0800 (PST), fasisi
    > <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone
    > who said :
    >
    > >I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    > >on each level of my learning java?

    >
    > seehttp://mindprod.com/project/projects.html
    > --
    > Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
    > The Java Glossaryhttp://mindprod.com


    Hello,

    Great projects. Thanks for the source. Thanks a lot.
    fasisi, Dec 3, 2007
    #8
  9. fasisi

    mich Guest

    "fasisi" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Dec 1, 12:05 am, "mich" <> wrote:
    >> "fasisi" <> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:...
    >>
    >> > Hello,

    >>
    >> > I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    >> > on each level of my learning java?

    >>
    >> Why do you want to learn java? Is it just to learn it or is there some
    >> employment objective? What type of employment are you interested in?

    >
    > I want to learn Java to make money. I am thinking to sell software.


    Ok, but in general what type of software? There are so many different things
    that you can do with Java that you might narrow it down. An obvious example
    would be what type of front-end would your software have? HTML or Swing, or
    something else?
    mich, Dec 3, 2007
    #9
  10. fasisi

    fasisi Guest

    On Dec 3, 3:18 pm, "mich" <> wrote:
    > "fasisi" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > On Dec 1, 12:05 am, "mich" <> wrote:
    > >> "fasisi" <> wrote in message

    >
    > >>news:...

    >
    > >> > Hello,

    >
    > >> > I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    > >> > on each level of my learning java?

    >
    > >> Why do you want to learn java? Is it just to learn it or is there some
    > >> employment objective? What type of employment are you interested in?

    >
    > > I want to learn Java to make money. I am thinking to sell software.

    >
    > Ok, but in general what type of software? There are so many different things
    > that you can do with Java that you might narrow it down. An obvious example
    > would be what type of front-end would your software have? HTML or Swing, or
    > something else?


    Currently I am thinking about librarian software. The software stores
    library collection information. How many books for each title... how
    much left available (can be borrowed)... borrow frequency... how much
    books lost... etc. The front-end will be swing.
    fasisi, Dec 3, 2007
    #10
  11. fasisi

    fasisi Guest

    On Dec 3, 1:51 pm, Ramon F Herrera <> wrote:
    > On Nov 29, 11:49 pm,fasisi<> wrote:
    >
    > > Hello,

    >
    > > I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    > > on each level of my learning java?

    >
    > > Thank you

    >
    > There is an award winning book: "Thinking in Java". Remarkably, you
    > can get it for free on the net.
    >
    > I would recommend to start with NetBeans, specially if you are used to
    > MSVS, because it is very easy. Then, you will want more and naturally
    > migrate to Eclipse, the best IDE ever written.
    >
    > If you are going to use a GUI Builder, don't bother with Matisse.
    > There is a much better one (bidirectional), an Eclipse plugin.
    >
    > -Ramon


    Get "Thinking in Java" for free? Mmm... what is the url? Is it
    torrent?
    Actually I have both NetBeans and Eclipse for now I still prefer
    NetBeans. I still can't make Eclipse open Java's API doc when I ask
    for help on some keywords or class name. Can you help me with this one
    (open Java's API doc)?

    Thank you
    fasisi, Dec 4, 2007
    #11
  12. fasisi wrote:
    > Get "Thinking in Java" for free? Mmm... what is the url? Is it
    > torrent?


    Nope, not a torrent (the book is not that large).
    http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIJ/

    //Roger Lindsjö
    Roger Lindsjö, Dec 4, 2007
    #12
  13. fasisi

    Lew Guest

    Roger Lindsjö wrote:
    > fasisi wrote:
    > > Get "Thinking in Java" for free? Mmm... what is the url? Is it
    >> torrent?

    >
    > Nope, not a torrent (the book is not that large).
    > http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIJ/


    The free version is the 3rd edition of the book. The 4th edition is for money.

    IMHO /Thinking in Java/ lives up to the title, but it is not necessarily the
    best exemplar of how to think in Java. Avoid duck-like imprinting on Bruce
    Eckel's style, at least until you've read works by the likes of Joshua Bloch,
    Brian Goetz, Doug Lea, Marty Hall and the other luminaries of Java disquisition.

    TIJ was a strong jumpstart in my early education in Java programming.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Dec 4, 2007
    #13
  14. fasisi

    fasisi Guest

    On Dec 4, 10:02 pm, Lew <> wrote:
    > Roger Lindsjö wrote:
    > >fasisiwrote:
    > > > Get "Thinking in Java" for free? Mmm... what is the url? Is it
    > >> torrent?

    >
    > > Nope, not a torrent (the book is not that large).
    > >http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIJ/

    >
    > The free version is the 3rd edition of the book. The 4th edition is for money.
    >
    > IMHO /Thinking in Java/ lives up to the title, but it is not necessarily the
    > best exemplar of how to think in Java. Avoid duck-like imprinting on Bruce
    > Eckel's style, at least until you've read works by the likes of Joshua Bloch,
    > Brian Goetz, Doug Lea, Marty Hall and the other luminaries of Java disquisition.
    >
    > TIJ was a strong jumpstart in my early education in Java programming.
    >
    > --
    > Lew


    Thanks a lot for the book's link. I am downloading it. Great source!

    Thank you.
    fasisi, Dec 5, 2007
    #14
  15. On Dec 3, 10:26 pm, fasisi <> wrote:
    > On Dec 3, 1:51 pm, Ramon F Herrera <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Nov 29, 11:49 pm,fasisi<> wrote:

    >
    > > > Hello,

    >
    > > > I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    > > > on each level of my learning java?

    >
    > > > Thank you

    >
    > > There is an award winning book: "Thinking in Java". Remarkably, you
    > > can get it for free on the net.

    >
    > > I would recommend to start with NetBeans, specially if you are used to
    > > MSVS, because it is very easy. Then, you will want more and naturally
    > > migrate to Eclipse, the best IDE ever written.

    >
    > > If you are going to use a GUI Builder, don't bother with Matisse.
    > > There is a much better one (bidirectional), an Eclipse plugin.

    >
    > > -Ramon

    >
    > Get "Thinking in Java" for free? Mmm... what is the url? Is it
    > torrent?


    > Actually I have both NetBeans and Eclipse for now I still prefer

    NetBeans.

    My prediction is that (1) You will keep NetBeans. Some stuff is much
    better done in NetBeans, such as the OpenOffice plugin. (2) As soon as
    you perform certain things in Eclipse, you will migrate to it. YMMV.
    If you plan to use a GUI builder you *have* to use Eclipse.

    > I still can't make Eclipse open Java's API doc when I ask
    > for help on some keywords or class name. Can you help me with this one
    > (open Java's API doc)?


    What happens is that you have to install the Javadoc somehow. Get the
    SWT package (the most professionally packaged package I own, you can
    tell its IBM heritage). It comes with a full directory that you place
    in the workspace folder, and it has some instructions to make the SWT
    javadoc work with code highlighting.

    -Ramon
    Ramon F Herrera, Dec 5, 2007
    #15
  16. fasisi

    fasisi Guest

    On Dec 5, 10:50 am, Ramon F Herrera <> wrote:
    > On Dec 3, 10:26 pm, fasisi <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Dec 3, 1:51 pm, Ramon F Herrera <> wrote:

    >
    > > > On Nov 29, 11:49 pm,fasisi<> wrote:

    >
    > > > > Hello,

    >
    > > > > I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    > > > > on each level of my learning java?

    >
    > > > > Thank you

    >
    > > > There is an award winning book: "Thinking in Java". Remarkably, you
    > > > can get it for free on the net.

    >
    > > > I would recommend to start with NetBeans, specially if you are used to
    > > > MSVS, because it is very easy. Then, you will want more and naturally
    > > > migrate to Eclipse, the best IDE ever written.

    >
    > > > If you are going to use a GUI Builder, don't bother with Matisse.
    > > > There is a much better one (bidirectional), an Eclipse plugin.

    >
    > > > -Ramon

    >
    > > Get "Thinking in Java" for free? Mmm... what is the url? Is it
    > > torrent?

    >
    > > Actually I have both NetBeans and Eclipse for now I still prefer

    > NetBeans.
    >
    > My prediction is that (1) You will keep NetBeans. Some stuff is much
    > better done in NetBeans, such as the OpenOffice plugin. (2) As soon as
    > you perform certain things in Eclipse, you will migrate to it. YMMV.
    > If you plan to use a GUI builder you *have* to use Eclipse.
    >
    > > I still can't make Eclipse open Java's API doc when I ask
    > > for help on some keywords or class name. Can you help me with this one
    > > (open Java's API doc)?

    >
    > What happens is that you have to install the Javadoc somehow. Get the
    > SWT package (the most professionally packaged package I own, you can
    > tell its IBM heritage). It comes with a full directory that you place
    > in the workspace folder, and it has some instructions to make the SWT
    > javadoc work with code highlighting.
    >
    > -Ramon


    Where can I get that Javadoc? Is it from java's website? I already
    have it.
    fasisi, Dec 5, 2007
    #16
  17. On Dec 5, 12:12 am, fasisi <> wrote:
    > On Dec 5, 10:50 am, Ramon F Herrera <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Dec 3, 10:26 pm, fasisi <> wrote:

    >
    > > > On Dec 3, 1:51 pm, Ramon F Herrera <> wrote:

    >
    > > > > On Nov 29, 11:49 pm,fasisi<> wrote:

    >
    > > > > > Hello,

    >
    > > > > > I want to learn java. Do you have idea for a project that I can bring
    > > > > > on each level of my learning java?

    >
    > > > > > Thank you

    >
    > > > > There is an award winning book: "Thinking in Java". Remarkably, you
    > > > > can get it for free on the net.

    >
    > > > > I would recommend to start with NetBeans, specially if you are used to
    > > > > MSVS, because it is very easy. Then, you will want more and naturally
    > > > > migrate to Eclipse, the best IDE ever written.

    >
    > > > > If you are going to use a GUI Builder, don't bother with Matisse.
    > > > > There is a much better one (bidirectional), an Eclipse plugin.

    >
    > > > > -Ramon

    >
    > > > Get "Thinking in Java" for free? Mmm... what is the url? Is it
    > > > torrent?

    >
    > > > Actually I have both NetBeans and Eclipse for now I still prefer

    > > NetBeans.

    >
    > > My prediction is that (1) You will keep NetBeans. Some stuff is much
    > > better done in NetBeans, such as the OpenOffice plugin. (2) As soon as
    > > you perform certain things in Eclipse, you will migrate to it. YMMV.
    > > If you plan to use a GUI builder you *have* to use Eclipse.

    >
    > > > I still can't make Eclipse open Java's API doc when I ask
    > > > for help on some keywords or class name. Can you help me with this one
    > > > (open Java's API doc)?

    >
    > > What happens is that you have to install the Javadoc somehow. Get the
    > > SWT package (the most professionally packaged package I own, you can
    > > tell its IBM heritage). It comes with a full directory that you place
    > > in the workspace folder, and it has some instructions to make the SWT
    > > javadoc work with code highlighting.

    >
    > > -Ramon

    >
    > Where can I get that Javadoc? Is it from java's website? I already
    > have it.


    What I meant is that every package should in theory come with its
    corresponding javadoc, and instructions for making it work under
    Eclipse. I can comment on two packages that I have installed. In the
    javadoc category this is the grade they get:

    - SWT: A+
    - OpenOffice F-

    My suggestion is that you download and install SWT (the Swing
    competitor, comes from the same folks that brought us Eclipse,
    available in Eclipse's web site) just to familiarize yourself with
    Javadoc-Eclipse hookup details, as they were very clear (but don't
    recall them).

    Having javadoc help is one of the most helpful productivity (and
    learning) features I can think of. We developers should make a point
    of asking: "yes, your package sounds great, but does it come with
    javadoc for Eclipse? It is a deal breaker for me".

    -Ramon
    Ramon F Herrera, Dec 5, 2007
    #17
  18. fasisi

    Lew Guest

    Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    > My prediction is that (1) You will keep NetBeans. Some stuff is much
    > better done in NetBeans, such as the OpenOffice plugin. (2) As soon as
    > you perform certain things in Eclipse, you will migrate to it. YMMV.
    > If you plan to use a GUI builder you *have* to use Eclipse.


    Based on what do you predict those things?

    I've used both Eclipse (and its variants, WSAD and RAD) and NetBeans for
    years. Usually on the same projects. I have yet to prefer Eclipse.

    Yet I would not predict that the OP would stay with NetBeans over Eclipse.

    As to the second point, I have read many, many comments from people who prefer
    Eclipse but go on to say that NetBeans is better for GUI development, often
    with words like "admittedly" or "except for". I am interested in why you feel
    one would "*have*" to go the Eclipse route.

    I note that those who seem strongest in GUI development claim to prefer a text
    editor to any GUI builder tool. They tend to comments like, "It has a great
    GUI builder, but I prefer just to code the GUI in the editor."

    And by "GUI", do you mean "Swing"?

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Dec 5, 2007
    #18
  19. Re: GUI Builders (including 'vi' and 'Notepad')

    On Dec 5, 1:07 am, Lew <> wrote:
    > Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    > > My prediction is that (1) You will keep NetBeans. Some stuff is much
    > > better done in NetBeans, such as the OpenOffice plugin. (2) As soon as
    > > you perform certain things in Eclipse, you will migrate to it. YMMV.
    > > If you plan to use a GUI builder you *have* to use Eclipse.

    >
    > Based on what do you predict those things?
    >
    > I've used both Eclipse (and its variants, WSAD and RAD) and NetBeans for
    > years. Usually on the same projects. I have yet to prefer Eclipse.
    >
    > Yet I would not predict that the OP would stay with NetBeans over Eclipse.
    >
    > As to the second point, I have read many, many comments from people who prefer
    > Eclipse but go on to say that NetBeans is better for GUI development, often
    > with words like "admittedly" or "except for". I am interested in why you feel
    > one would "*have*" to go the Eclipse route.
    >
    > I note that those who seem strongest in GUI development claim to prefer a text
    > editor to any GUI builder tool. They tend to comments like, "It has a great
    > GUI builder, but I prefer just to code the GUI in the editor."
    >


    I agree entirely with your comments IF (and only if) the developer is
    limited to using free software. If the developer can afford a couple
    hundred bucks for a tool that will bring high productivity, then I
    disagree with your assessment. The tool that makes all the difference
    in GUI building is this:

    http://www.windowbuilderpro.com/

    The state of free, OSS tools is such that no wonder people prefer 'vi'
    or 'notepad'.

    > And by "GUI", do you mean "Swing"?
    >


    Nope. My comments stands, as the (one and only acceptable) tool for
    GUI building is equally adept at Swing and SWT.

    -Ramon
    Ramon F Herrera, Dec 5, 2007
    #19
  20. fasisi

    Mark Space Guest

    Re: GUI Builders (including 'vi' and 'Notepad')

    Ramon F Herrera wrote:

    >
    > I agree entirely with your comments IF (and only if) the developer is
    > limited to using free software. If the developer can afford a couple
    > hundred bucks for a tool that will bring high productivity, then I
    > disagree with your assessment. The tool that makes all the difference
    > in GUI building is this:
    >
    > http://www.windowbuilderpro.com/


    Could you give me two examples how that program far exceeds what is
    available for free? Specific to Java, of course.

    >
    > The state of free, OSS tools is such that no wonder people prefer 'vi'
    > or 'notepad'.


    There's no way vi can match NetBeans.

    My experience with pay-for tools is that you get a lot less than the
    free components, plus the hassle of vendor-lock in.

    Everything looks slick and great until you get half way into it with a
    real project, then you find out where they cut corners and why some
    other library critical to your project is inherently incompatible with
    any real-world use of your pricey tool.
    Mark Space, Dec 5, 2007
    #20
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