Noob programer request help!

Discussion in 'Java' started by rodrigo.aros.m@gmail.com, Mar 17, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Hi - im really lost in java and i wonder if u guys could give me some
    tips for learn the language - or how did u started, often i sit in
    front jcreator and i dont know what to do, i have tryed books i really
    have, but i dont seem to find the right way to learn please give me
    some tips and advise of how i should start or any info that would
    help.

    sorry my bad typing.

    thx for the help..
    , Mar 17, 2007
    #1
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  2. wrote:
    > Hi - im really lost in java and i wonder if u guys could give me some
    > tips for learn the language - or how did u started, often i sit in
    > front jcreator and i dont know what to do, i have tryed books i really
    > have, but i dont seem to find the right way to learn please give me
    > some tips and advise of how i should start or any info that would
    > help.
    >
    > sorry my bad typing.
    >
    > thx for the help..
    >

    Try Sun's tutorial.
    Joshua Cranmer, Mar 17, 2007
    #2
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  3. Guest

    On 17 Mar, 20:27, wrote:
    > Hi - im really lost in java and i wonder if u guys could give me some
    > tips for learn the language - or how did u started, often i sit in
    > front jcreator and i dont know what to do, i have tryed books i really
    > have, but i dont seem to find the right way to learn please give me
    > some tips and advise of how i should start or any info that would
    > help.
    >
    > sorry my bad typing.
    >
    > thx for the help..


    Hi,

    I started with 'Thinking in JAVA' - available online at http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4
    - excellent book for beginners (and not only). There are also some
    totorials at http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/ - right place to
    take a look to improve your skills after reading 'Thinking...':)
    Don't give up,

    Regards,
    Bigos
    , Mar 17, 2007
    #3
  4. Lew Guest

    wrote:
    >> Hi - im really lost in java and i wonder if u guys could give me some
    >> tips for learn the language - or how did u started, often i sit in
    >> front jcreator and i dont know what to do, i have tryed books i really
    >> have, but i dont seem to find the right way to learn please give me
    >> some tips and advise of how i should start or any info that would
    >> help.


    Joshua Cranmer wrote:
    > Try Sun's tutorial.


    In addition to the tutorials, available somewhere within http://java.sun.com/,
    there are a lot of white papers and article links there.

    IBM has developerWorks, with a host of Java stuff.
    <http://www-130.ibm.com/developerworks/java> , and alphaworks,
    <http://www.alphaworks.ibm.com/java> , ditto but somewhat more advanced. They
    also sport tutorials,
    <http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/views/java/libraryview.jsp?type_by=Tutorials>
    ..

    -- Lew
    Lew, Mar 17, 2007
    #4
  5. jupiter Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi - im really lost in java and i wonder if u guys could give me
    > some
    > tips for learn the language - or how did u started, often i sit
    > in
    > front jcreator and i dont know what to do,


    Try notepad instead of JCreator. That will give you lots to think
    about.
    jupiter, Mar 17, 2007
    #5
  6. Lew Guest

    jupiter wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi - im really lost in java and i wonder if u guys could give me
    >> some
    >> tips for learn the language - or how did u started, often i sit
    >> in
    >> front jcreator and i dont know what to do,

    >
    > Try notepad instead of JCreator. That will give you lots to think
    > about.


    That is so mean. :)

    Unfortunately, what you get to think about has little to do with Java.

    -- Lew
    Lew, Mar 17, 2007
    #6
  7. jupiter Guest

    "Lew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > jupiter wrote:
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hi - im really lost in java and i wonder if u guys could give
    >>> me some
    >>> tips for learn the language - or how did u started, often i sit
    >>> in
    >>> front jcreator and i dont know what to do,

    >>
    >> Try notepad instead of JCreator. That will give you lots to
    >> think about.

    >
    > That is so mean. :)
    >

    Sometimes I think I am good at spotting fakes or lazy students, but
    I'll admit that this guy rode the fine line that makes them hard to
    distinguish.

    I read his text again and find it incredible to think of sitting in
    front of an IDE and not opening a book and following along. It's
    so far from any reality that I've known that, well, you know where
    this is going ......
    jupiter, Mar 18, 2007
    #7
  8. Chris Uppal Guest

    jupiter wrote:

    > I read his text again and find it incredible to think of sitting in
    > front of an IDE and not opening a book and following along. It's
    > so far from any reality that I've known that, well, you know where
    > this is going ......


    My guess (only a guess) is that the OP hasn't got going enough with programming
    yet for the rate at which the act of programming generates new ideas for things
    to do, to outstrip the rate at which you can implement them.

    When you first start out there's obviously not all /that/ much that you can
    usefully do except soulless practice (reading books, doing the exercises,
    yawn...). Finger scales, and worse. As you start to write more, you (or at
    least I do, and I don't think it's uncommon) keep turning up things that you
    want to try for one reason or another. It may be something that you need, or
    something that is an interesting spin-off from what you are supposed to be
    doing, or it may be something that's done wrong that you want to try to fix.
    One way of another, the more programming you do, the more there is /to/ do (and
    that's not even counting paid work ;-)

    We all know that the only workable way to learn programming is to practise --
    but it's difficult to practise if there's nothing obvious to practise /on/...

    -- chris
    Chris Uppal, Mar 18, 2007
    #8
  9. Oliver Wong Guest

    "Chris Uppal" <-THIS.org> wrote in message
    news:45fd951e$1$763$...
    > jupiter wrote:
    >
    >> I read his text again and find it incredible to think of sitting in
    >> front of an IDE and not opening a book and following along. It's
    >> so far from any reality that I've known that, well, you know where
    >> this is going ......

    >
    > My guess (only a guess) is that the OP hasn't got going enough with
    > programming
    > yet for the rate at which the act of programming generates new ideas for
    > things
    > to do, to outstrip the rate at which you can implement them.
    >
    > When you first start out there's obviously not all /that/ much that you
    > can
    > usefully do except soulless practice (reading books, doing the
    > exercises,
    > yawn...). Finger scales, and worse. As you start to write more, you
    > (or at
    > least I do, and I don't think it's uncommon) keep turning up things that
    > you
    > want to try for one reason or another. It may be something that you
    > need, or
    > something that is an interesting spin-off from what you are supposed to
    > be
    > doing, or it may be something that's done wrong that you want to try to
    > fix.
    > One way of another, the more programming you do, the more there is /to/
    > do (and
    > that's not even counting paid work ;-)
    >
    > We all know that the only workable way to learn programming is to
    > practise --
    > but it's difficult to practise if there's nothing obvious to practise
    > /on/...


    In case anyone reading this is in that situation:

    If you're just starting out: {
    * Consider buying a introductory book, following along, and doing the
    exercises.
    * Consider doing Sun's official tutorial, following it and doing the
    exercises: http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/
    * Consider finding a local university, looking up the schedule for the
    introductory Java programming courses, and just attending the classes.
    Most universities are large enough that you don't even need to register as
    a student (and thus pay the tuition fees). You can just sit in the class
    and listen to the lectures given by the professor (I used to do this a
    lot, before I got busy with a full time job). Of course, if you don't pay
    the tuition, you shouldn't waste the teacher's time buy doing the exam
    (forcing him/her to correct it needlessly), and you won't be able to get
    credits towards a diploma.
    * Consider googling for the term "introductory java exercises" and see
    what turns up. Usually it'll be the webpage for a university course on
    Java. For example, I got this page:
    http://chortle.ccsu.edu/CS151/cs151java.html
    }

    if you feel confident that the above is too easy for you: {
    * Consider hanging out in this newsgroup, answering questions for other
    people. If you don't know the answer, research it!
    * Consider going to Roedy's list of project and implementing some of
    them: http://mindprod.com/projects/projects.html
    * Consider heading over to SourceForge (http://sourceforge.net/) or some
    other website hosting open source software, finding some Java programs
    (perhaps one that you've personally used, like maybe the Azureus
    Bittorrent Client) and studying the source.
    * At this point, you should know enough about Java that you can start
    coming up with your own projects as well, perhaps partially inspired by
    some of the ones listed at Roedy's site.
    }

    if you feel confident that the above is too easy for you: {
    * Consider heading to SourceForge (http://sourceforge.net/), finding
    projects written in Java, reading their bug lists, and try to actually fix
    some of the bugs, submitting your fixes back to the community.
    * Google for "Java programming contest" and consider entering some of
    the contests that you find.
    * Consider heading over to Download.com (http://www.download.com/) or
    some other website hosting closed-source shareware or "small" proprietary
    software, and seeing if you can implement a similar program, despite not
    having access to their source code or design documents at all. If you
    succeed, you might try selling your software in competition with theirs,
    or releasing it as open source or freeware for the community.
    }

    I've added this info to
    http://moinmoin.riters.com/JINX/index.cgi/How_20do_20I_20learn_20Java_3f?action=show

    - Oliver
    Oliver Wong, Mar 21, 2007
    #9
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