Not a question, not really news either

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Sharon Phillips, Jul 17, 2007.

  1. I work for a large conservative BigCo, but have been using Ruby for
    some time now - sort of unofficially.
    Recently I managed to get approval to train other people in Ruby so
    they too would be able to use it.
    My first training session begins tomorrow with a small (but
    enthusiastic) group.
    Funny thing is, I sent out an email to see who would be interested,
    and *all* the responses I got back were from older people (as in
    older than 30 [being generous :) ]) who's backgrounds were in Cobol
    and mainframes. They're not exactly up-to-date with latest
    programming ideas (none had even heard of Ruby) but they're pretty
    smart and I can't wait.

    Just writing this as encouragement for anyone in the same position as
    myself.

    Cheers,
    Dave
    Sharon Phillips, Jul 17, 2007
    #1
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  2. Sharon Phillips

    Robert Dober Guest

    On 7/17/07, Sharon Phillips <> wrote:
    > I work for a large conservative BigCo, but have been using Ruby for
    > some time now - sort of unofficially.
    > Recently I managed to get approval to train other people in Ruby so
    > they too would be able to use it.
    > My first training session begins tomorrow with a small (but
    > enthusiastic) group.
    > Funny thing is, I sent out an email to see who would be interested,
    > and *all* the responses I got back were from older people (as in
    > older than 30 [being generous :) ]) who's backgrounds were in Cobol
    > and mainframes. They're not exactly up-to-date with latest
    > programming ideas (none had even heard of Ruby) but they're pretty
    > smart and I can't wait.
    >
    > Just writing this as encouragement for anyone in the same position as
    > myself.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Dave
    >
    >

    Hi Sharon err Dave ;)
    this is indeed interesting stuff, will you keep us updated. BTW my age >> 30 ;).

    Cheers
    Robert


    --
    I always knew that one day Smalltalk would replace Java.
    I just didn't know it would be called Ruby
    -- Kent Beck
    Robert Dober, Jul 17, 2007
    #2
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  3. Sharon Phillips

    Chad Perrin Guest

    On Tue, Jul 17, 2007 at 09:24:03PM +0900, Robert Dober wrote:
    > On 7/17/07, Sharon Phillips <> wrote:
    > >
    > >Cheers,
    > >Dave
    > >

    > Hi Sharon err Dave ;)
    > this is indeed interesting stuff, will you keep us updated. BTW my age >>
    > 30 ;).


    Hmm. Mine too. I wonder what the common age distribution of Ruby
    enthusiasts is.

    I noticed the Sharon/Dave thing, too. I wonder what that's about.

    --
    CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
    MacUser, Nov. 1990: "There comes a time in the history of any project when
    it becomes necessary to shoot the engineers and begin production."
    Chad Perrin, Jul 17, 2007
    #3
  4. > BTW my age >> 30 ;)

    This would make an interesting thread in itself - what people's
    backgrounds were before Ruby, and what sort of spread of work people
    are doing currently.
    Sharon Phillips, Jul 17, 2007
    #4
  5. Sharon Phillips

    Todd Burch Guest

    Sharon Phillips wrote:
    > ...
    > older people (as in
    > older than 30 [being generous :) ]) who's backgrounds were in Cobol
    > and mainframes. They're not exactly up-to-date with latest
    > programming ideas (none had even heard of Ruby) but they're pretty
    > smart and I can't wait.
    >


    Hey Dave. 44 here. I started with Ruby in 2004. It's the most
    enjoyable language I've ever programmed in. Closest thing to it on the
    mainframe is REXX, and compare to Ruby, REXX sucks. (And I love REXX!,
    or, at least what I am able to do with REXX on the mainframe)

    Hope your training session goes well.

    This will get them excited - assuming they are familiar with REXX. Show
    them how to sort an array in REXX (a screen worth of code, if you are
    good), and then with Ruby. They'll be hooked!

    Todd

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Todd Burch, Jul 17, 2007
    #5
  6. Sharon Phillips

    Todd Burch Guest

    Sharon Phillips wrote:
    >> BTW my age >> 30 ;)

    >
    > This would make an interesting thread in itself - what people's
    > backgrounds were before Ruby, and what sort of spread of work people
    > are doing currently.


    Start 'er up!

    Todd

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Todd Burch, Jul 17, 2007
    #6
  7. Sharon Phillips

    Lyle Johnson Guest

    On Jul 17, 2007, at 7:42 AM, Chad Perrin wrote:

    > I noticed the Sharon/Dave thing, too. I wonder what that's about.


    Given that the user name on the e-mail account is "phillipsds", I'm
    guessing that Dave and his wife Sharon share that e-mail account, and
    that she drew the short straw and got her name attached to it.

    Or maybe he has a split personality. That could work too.
    Lyle Johnson, Jul 17, 2007
    #7
  8. Backgrounds before Ruby (was Re: Not a question, not really newseither)

    Sharon Phillips wrote:
    >> BTW my age >> 30 ;)

    >
    > This would make an interesting thread in itself - what people's
    > backgrounds were before Ruby, and what sort of spread of work people are
    > doing currently.
    >
    >


    Well, there's another thread going on about this, but I don't have time
    to type in the whole enchilada right now. :) But *immediately* before
    Ruby, my main languages were Perl and R -- Perl for extracting data from
    various text and log files and in some cases capturing raw data and in
    some cases analyzing said data, and R for analysis and graphics. That's
    still the way I do my day job, with the addition of SQL and RDBMSs SQL
    Server and PostgreSQL. That's mostly because we don't have any other
    Ruby programmers and I have a few thousand lines of my own Perl that
    needs to be maintained.

    But at home, I've pretty much abandoned Perl for Ruby, and do hard core
    numerical work in R. The other language I do a lot of is Lisp/Scheme,
    because of its usage in algorithmic composition and synthesis of music.
    A strong number four is Forth. I do almost no programming in C or Java
    and none in any BASIC, Pascal, C++, Python, PHP, or Lua. About the only
    one out of that list that appeals to me is Lua, and I'm also learning
    Erlang. I have no desire to get into Haskell or OCaml.

    The "spread" of work at home includes computational finance, algorithmic
    composition and synthesis of music, Linux capacity planning, performance
    modeling, and, of course, beta testing all the open source tools for all
    of the above. :)
    M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, Jul 17, 2007
    #8
  9. Sharon Phillips

    SonOfLilit Guest

    Re: Backgrounds before Ruby (was Re: Not a question, not really news either)

    On 7/17/07, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky <> wrote:
    > Sharon Phillips wrote:
    > But at home, I've pretty much abandoned Perl for Ruby, and do hard core
    > numerical work in R. The other language I do a lot of is Lisp/Scheme,
    > because of its usage in algorithmic composition and synthesis of music.
    > A strong number four is Forth. I do almost no programming in C or Java
    > and none in any BASIC, Pascal, C++, Python, PHP, or Lua. About the only
    > one out of that list that appeals to me is Lua, and I'm also learning
    > Erlang. I have no desire to get into Haskell or OCaml.


    I wonder, why aren't you interested in Haskell and OCaml?


    Aur
    SonOfLilit, Jul 17, 2007
    #9
  10. Sharon Phillips

    Chad Perrin Guest

    On Tue, Jul 17, 2007 at 10:17:46PM +0900, Lyle Johnson wrote:
    >
    > On Jul 17, 2007, at 7:42 AM, Chad Perrin wrote:
    >
    > >I noticed the Sharon/Dave thing, too. I wonder what that's about.

    >
    > Given that the user name on the e-mail account is "phillipsds", I'm
    > guessing that Dave and his wife Sharon share that e-mail account, and
    > that she drew the short straw and got her name attached to it.
    >
    > Or maybe he has a split personality. That could work too.


    Sounds like a good movie waiting to be made. I wonder if a movie about
    someone with dissociative personality disorder and a love of the Ruby
    language would do any good for the language community.

    --
    CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
    Leon Festinger: "A man with a conviction is a hard man to change. Tell him
    you disagree and he turns away. Show him facts and figures and he questions
    your sources. Appeal to logic and he fails to see your point."
    Chad Perrin, Jul 17, 2007
    #10
  11. Sharon Phillips

    Ilan Berci Guest

    Backgrounds before Ruby (was Re: Not a question, not really

    M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:
    > Sharon Phillips wrote:
    >>> BTW my age >> 30 ;)

    >>
    >> This would make an interesting thread in itself - what people's
    >> backgrounds were before Ruby, and what sort of spread of work people are
    >> doing currently.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >

    Day job is C++, after work and weekends are all full of family and
    chores, sleep time is all spent dreaming and scheming in Ruby.

    ilan

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Ilan Berci, Jul 17, 2007
    #11
  12. Re: Backgrounds before Ruby (was Re: Not a question, not really newseither)

    SonOfLilit wrote:
    > On 7/17/07, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky <> wrote:
    >> Sharon Phillips wrote:
    >> But at home, I've pretty much abandoned Perl for Ruby, and do hard core
    >> numerical work in R. The other language I do a lot of is Lisp/Scheme,
    >> because of its usage in algorithmic composition and synthesis of music.
    >> A strong number four is Forth. I do almost no programming in C or Java
    >> and none in any BASIC, Pascal, C++, Python, PHP, or Lua. About the only
    >> one out of that list that appeals to me is Lua, and I'm also learning
    >> Erlang. I have no desire to get into Haskell or OCaml.

    >
    > I wonder, why aren't you interested in Haskell and OCaml?
    >
    >
    > Aur
    >
    >


    Well ... a couple of reasons:

    1. I already know 1.5 perfectly good functional languages, Lisp/Scheme
    2. I'm learning Erlang, also a functional language, and Erlang's
    concurrency strikes me as more useful than the goodies that Haskell and
    OCaml have tacked on to the functional paradigm.
    3. Only a few applications are written in Haskell and OCaml, and when I
    write an application, I usually chose a language as well suited to the
    domain as possible.

    I just got the Programming Erlang book yesterday, too. :)
    M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, Jul 18, 2007
    #12
  13. Re: Backgrounds before Ruby (was Re: Not a question, not really

    > >> This would make an interesting thread in itself - what people's
    > >> backgrounds were before Ruby, and what sort of spread of=20

    > work people are
    > >> doing currently.


    Before Ruby, I did mainly Perl. And before that, Tcl and C++.
    Now doing nearly Ruby exclusively, with a wee bit of Java=20
    occasionally.

    Ronald
    --=20
    Ronald Fischer <>
    Phone: +49-89-452133-162
    Ronald Fischer, Jul 18, 2007
    #13
  14. Re: Backgrounds before Ruby (was Re: Not a question, not really

    >>>> This would make an interesting thread in itself - what people's
    >>>> backgrounds were before Ruby, and what sort of spread of work
    >>>> people are
    >>>> doing currently.


    I lived a life revolving almost exclusively around Delphi for a
    number of years. I still have a soft spot for the language, but
    Borland lost their way some time ago, windows development got
    swallowed by Visual Studio, and I discovered life beyond Windows.
    I went back to school and learnt Java, which I also like (no, really.
    I don't know why though) and still dabble in.
    I tried Ruby about five years ago (guessing) but didn't get it.
    Retried it again about (guessing again) six months ago, and this time
    it clicked.
    Work is an eclectic mix of mostly pl-sql in Oracle 8 (and you though
    vb was bad), C (C++ is far to modern for us) and, mainly because no
    one else want's it, vba work.
    I've tried Python, and can see why people like it, but Ruby suits my
    style better.
    Currently (as in the last week) been learning Erlang. Awkward syntax,
    but very nice language.

    Oh, and the Dave/Sharon thing isn't half as interesting as most of
    the suggestion here. Sorry.

    Cheers,
    Dave
    Sharon Phillips, Jul 18, 2007
    #14
  15. Sharon Phillips

    Todd Benson Guest

    Re: Backgrounds before Ruby (was Re: Not a question, not really

    On 7/18/07, Sharon Phillips <> wrote:
    >
    > Oh, and the Dave/Sharon thing isn't half as interesting as most of
    > the suggestion here. Sorry.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Dave


    Dang. I was hoping we would discover you worked for MI6 or something :)

    Todd
    Todd Benson, Jul 18, 2007
    #15
  16. Re: Backgrounds before Ruby (was Re: Not a question, not really

    On 7/17/07, Ilan Berci <> wrote:
    > M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:
    > > Sharon Phillips wrote:
    > >>> BTW my age >> 30 ;)
    > >>
    > >> This would make an interesting thread in itself - what people's
    > >> backgrounds were before Ruby, and what sort of spread of work people are
    > >> doing currently.


    Just the highlights <G>

    In College (BSEE/CS UConn '74)
    Work scope, learning everything I could.
    Fortran II
    1620 Assembler Language
    PL/I
    Fortran IV
    Lisp 1.5
    Snobol
    PDP-5/8 assembler
    PDP-11 assembler
    probably others I've gotten too old to remember.

    IBM internship
    Work stuff, doing data analysis to support a planning department.
    APL/360 and PL/I

    IBM
    Workscope, applications and systems development on mainframes
    PL/I,
    PL/S, PL/AS (These were IBM internal languages which had the same
    kind of relationship
    to PL/I that C has to Algol, i.e. higher level syntax than
    Assembler, but still 'close to the metal.')
    Workscope: research assignment to explore OO technology ca 1981)
    C
    ClassC (a C dialect with Smalltalk methods/messaging concepts added,
    my brainchild and used within IBM for a few years, kind of like
    Objective-C with different syntax, Brad Cox and I only found out about
    each others work too late <G>).
    which led to workscope as an OO evangelist within IBM

    SMALLTALK!!!!! (I was the secretary of the ANSI standards
    committee, wrote the early prototype of Visualage/Smalltalk, and
    developed the Visualage/Smalltalk distributed feature)

    Java - worked on VisualAge MicroEdition IDE (which was the immediate
    precursor to Eclipse

    Hobby
    Apple II basic - yeah I know
    Pascal
    Object Pascal and MacApp
    perl
    bash
    playing a bit with Haskell for contrast to Ruby.

    RUBY!!!!!!!

    In retirement and consulting
    Ruby and Rails


    --
    Rick DeNatale

    My blog on Ruby
    http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/
    Rick DeNatale, Jul 20, 2007
    #16
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