Oblique Strategies

Discussion in 'Python' started by robin, Sep 14, 2005.

  1. robin

    robin Guest

    The Oblique Strategies were originally a set of one-hundred cards,
    each bearing a short phrase. They were devised by Brian Eno and Peter
    Schmidt as ways of working through creative problems. When a blockage
    occurs, draw a card, and see if it can direct you in a tangential way
    that helps solve the problem.

    I have created a Python implementation that includes two different
    decks. Since one of these is my own, I can be sure this is an original
    contribution for all of you Python coders stuck on a problem!

    Surf:
    http://noisetheatre.blogspot.com/2005/09/oblique-strategies.html

    -----
    robin
    noisetheatre.blogspot.com
    robin, Sep 14, 2005
    #1
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  2. robin

    Tom Anderson Guest

    On Wed, 14 Sep 2005, robin wrote:

    > The Oblique Strategies were originally a set of one-hundred cards, each
    > bearing a short phrase. They were devised by Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt
    > as ways of working through creative problems. When a blockage occurs,
    > draw a card, and see if it can direct you in a tangential way that helps
    > solve the problem.


    Neat!

    I can't help but feel that putting the strategies in a file and using
    'fortune' to pick them would have been slightly simpler, but since i don't
    actually seem to have fortune on my machine, i'm actually rather happy
    that you've done this.

    I don't know about coding, but i think this might be handy in the cell
    biology research that constitutes my day job ...

    tom

    --
    Also, a 'dark future where there is only war!' ... have you seen the news lately? -- applez
    Tom Anderson, Sep 15, 2005
    #2
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  3. robin

    robin Guest

    Tom Anderson <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 14 Sep 2005, robin wrote:
    >
    >> The Oblique Strategies were originally a set of one-hundred cards, each
    >> bearing a short phrase. They were devised by Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt
    >> as ways of working through creative problems. When a blockage occurs,
    >> draw a card, and see if it can direct you in a tangential way that helps
    >> solve the problem.

    >
    >Neat!
    >
    >I can't help but feel that putting the strategies in a file and using
    >'fortune' to pick them would have been slightly simpler, but since i don't
    >actually seem to have fortune on my machine, i'm actually rather happy
    >that you've done this.


    The best things about this approach are that code and data are in one
    file and you don't need to be on a machine with fortune. (My machines
    seem to mostly have misfortune, aka Windows.)

    I'm happy how Python reduces most small problems down to the most
    trivial of exercises. This is less a program than a list of text
    strings.

    -----
    robin
    noisetheatre.blogspot.com
    robin, Sep 15, 2005
    #3
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