Off Topic: What is the good book to learn Python ?

Discussion in 'Python' started by Katie Tam, May 30, 2007.

  1. Katie Tam

    Katie Tam Guest

    Katie Tam, May 30, 2007
    #1
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  2. Katie Tam

    Joe Riopel Guest

    Joe Riopel, May 30, 2007
    #2
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  3. Katie Tam

    Guest

    On May 30, 1:25 pm, Katie Tam <> wrote:
    > I am new to this filed and begin to learn this langague. Can you tell
    > me the good books to start with ?
    >
    > Katie Tam
    > Network administratorhttp://www.linkwaves.com/main.asphttp://www.linkwaves.com


    Depends on what you like. For easy stuff that's fun, I liked "Python
    Programming for the Beginner" by Dawson as it let you create real
    applications (mostly silly games).

    "Beginning Python" by Hetland and the Python for Dummies book are both
    good. Hetland's goes over everything you'd need to know and it has
    some pretty cool, albeit complex examples in the last few chapters. If
    you want good exercises to go with what you learned in the book, I'd
    have to recommend "Python Programming: And Introduction to Computer
    Science" by Zelle. It's the only book I've seen with good exercises
    (or any exercises) at the end. Most don't have them.

    Once you're through all that wonderfulness, I would recommend "Python
    Programming 3rd Ed." by Lutz and/or "Core Python Programming" by Chun
    for excellent references.

    If you have any questions about any of these books let me know. I've
    read all of them (except for Lutz's...only halfway done with it).

    Mike
    , May 30, 2007
    #3
  4. Katie Tam

    7stud Guest

    In my opinion, "Beginning Python: From Novice to Professional" is a
    horrible book. I constantly have to consult "Learning Python(2nd ed.)
    to clear up all the blunders in Beginning Python. In addition,
    Learning Python(2nd ed) has exercises and Beginning Python doesn't.
    So I would recommend "Learning Python(2nd ed)".
    7stud, May 30, 2007
    #4
  5. Katie Tam

    Guest

    Katie Tam wrote:
    > I am new to this filed and begin to learn this langague. Can you tell
    > me the good books to start with ?

    My favorite is the O'Reilly jython book.
    This book is specifically about the python interpreter written in java
    but I have always found it to be a well written explanation of python
    basics in general.
    , May 30, 2007
    #5
  6. Katie Tam

    kaens Guest

    On 30 May 2007 11:25:22 -0700, Katie Tam <> wrote:
    > I am new to this filed and begin to learn this langague. Can you tell
    > me the good books to start with ?
    >
    >
    > Katie Tam
    > Network administrator
    > http://www.linkwaves.com/main.asp
    > http://www.linkwaves.com
    >
    > --
    > http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
    >


    If you're experienced with other programming languages, I'd recommend
    python in a nutshell, or perhaps programming python. I personally just
    skimmed through the online tutorial, and kept the library and api
    references handy.

    Orielly publishers almost always have excellent books on learning new
    programming languages.

    I would also recommend to stay away from any "for dummies" or "in x
    (hours/days)" books. They can be decent introductory material, but
    unless you are really really new to programming, you probably wouldn't
    be getting enough information to justify the cost of the book (and a
    lot of times they have a lot of bad practices in them)

    Good luck!
    kaens, May 31, 2007
    #6
  7. Katie Tam

    Aahz Guest

    In article <>,
    kaens <> wrote:
    >
    >I would also recommend to stay away from any "for dummies" or "in x
    >(hours/days)" books. They can be decent introductory material, but
    >unless you are really really new to programming, you probably wouldn't
    >be getting enough information to justify the cost of the book (and a
    >lot of times they have a lot of bad practices in them)


    Maybe you should try actually reading _Python for Dummies_. ;-)
    --
    Aahz () <*> http://www.pythoncraft.com/

    "as long as we like the same operating system, things are cool." --piranha
    Aahz, May 31, 2007
    #7
  8. Katie Tam

    Shane Geiger Guest

    Here are some excellent online books and tutorials to get started with:
    http://www.python.org/doc/tut/ http://www.ibiblio.org/obp/thinkCSpy/
    http://www.python.org/topics/learn/prog.html
    http://www.python.org/topics/learn/non-prog.html
    http://docs.python.org/lib/ http://diveintopython.org/
    http://gnosis.cx/TPiP/ http://rox.sourceforge.net/basic_python.html


    Here are some lists of books you can read online:
    http://www.techbooksforfree.com/perlpython.shtml
    http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Programming:Python
    http://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonBooks


    Some books:

    Byte of Python
    - online: http://www.byteofpython.info/files/120/byteofpython_120.pdf

    Quick Tour of Python
    - online:
    http://stsdas.stsci.edu/pyraf/doc/python_quick_tour/python_quick_tour.pdf

    Python in Nutshell
    - online:
    http://files.nixp.ru/books/programming/python/O'Reilly -- Python In A Nutshell.chm

    Python Standard Library
    - online: http://effbot.org/zone/librarybook-index.htm

    Python tutorial
    - online:
    http://www.ensta.fr/~enstar/doc/python/Python-Docs-2.4-PDF/tut.pdf


    kaens wrote:
    > On 30 May 2007 11:25:22 -0700, Katie Tam <> wrote:
    >
    >> I am new to this filed and begin to learn this langague. Can you tell
    >> me the good books to start with ?
    >>
    >>
    >> Katie Tam
    >> Network administrator
    >> http://www.linkwaves.com/main.asp
    >> http://www.linkwaves.com
    >>
    >> --
    >> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
    >>
    >>

    >
    > If you're experienced with other programming languages, I'd recommend
    > python in a nutshell, or perhaps programming python. I personally just
    > skimmed through the online tutorial, and kept the library and api
    > references handy.
    >
    > Orielly publishers almost always have excellent books on learning new
    > programming languages.
    >
    > I would also recommend to stay away from any "for dummies" or "in x
    > (hours/days)" books. They can be decent introductory material, but
    > unless you are really really new to programming, you probably wouldn't
    > be getting enough information to justify the cost of the book (and a
    > lot of times they have a lot of bad practices in them)
    >
    > Good luck!
    >


    --
    Shane Geiger
    IT Director
    National Council on Economic Education
    | 402-438-8958 | http://www.ncee.net

    Leading the Campaign for Economic and Financial Literacy
    Shane Geiger, May 31, 2007
    #8
  9. Katie Tam

    kaens Guest

    On 30 May 2007 17:28:39 -0700, Aahz <> wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > kaens <> wrote:
    > >
    > >I would also recommend to stay away from any "for dummies" or "in x
    > >(hours/days)" books. They can be decent introductory material, but
    > >unless you are really really new to programming, you probably wouldn't
    > >be getting enough information to justify the cost of the book (and a
    > >lot of times they have a lot of bad practices in them)

    >
    > Maybe you should try actually reading _Python for Dummies_. ;-)
    > --
    > Aahz () <*> http://www.pythoncraft.com/
    >
    > "as long as we like the same operating system, things are cool." --piranha
    > --
    > http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
    >


    I haven't read it, maybe I will. I have just noticed that the "for
    dummies" books tend to be a bit lacking.

    That's just my opinion, of course.
    kaens, May 31, 2007
    #9
  10. Katie Tam

    Aahz Guest

    In article <>,
    kaens <> wrote:
    >On 30 May 2007 17:28:39 -0700, Aahz <> wrote:
    >> In article <>,
    >> kaens <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>I would also recommend to stay away from any "for dummies" or "in x
    >>>(hours/days)" books. They can be decent introductory material, but
    >>>unless you are really really new to programming, you probably wouldn't
    >>>be getting enough information to justify the cost of the book (and a
    >>>lot of times they have a lot of bad practices in them)

    >>
    >> Maybe you should try actually reading _Python for Dummies_. ;-)

    >
    >I haven't read it, maybe I will. I have just noticed that the "for
    >dummies" books tend to be a bit lacking.


    Some are; some aren't. Like any broad and rapid-to-market series, there
    are plenty of books that are pretty bad. But there are also plenty of
    good Dummies books -- for example, _Personal Finance for Dummies_.

    Speaking as the co-author of _Python for Dummies_, one of our goals was
    to write a book that was both different from the other introductory
    Python books and managed to match the quality of the best of them. I'm
    not sure we succeeded in the second part, but I do think we did better
    than the median, if only because between me and David Goodger (our tech
    editor), we probably made fewer technical mistakes. ;-)
    --
    Aahz () <*> http://www.pythoncraft.com/

    "as long as we like the same operating system, things are cool." --piranha
    Aahz, May 31, 2007
    #10
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