Open source English dictionary to use programmatically w/ python

Discussion in 'Python' started by dgoldsmith_89, Jan 7, 2008.

  1. Can anyone point me to a downloadable open source English dictionary
    suitable for programmatic use with python: I'm programming a puzzle
    generator, and I need to be able to generate more or less complete
    lists of English words, alphabetized. Thanks! DG
     
    dgoldsmith_89, Jan 7, 2008
    #1
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  2. dgoldsmith_89

    Rick Dooling Guest

    On Jan 7, 4:37 pm, dgoldsmith_89 <> wrote:
    > Can anyone point me to a downloadable open source English dictionary
    > suitable for programmatic use with python: I'm programming a puzzle
    > generator, and I need to be able to generate more or less complete
    > lists of English words, alphabetized. Thanks! DG


    On Linux? WordNet and Dict and many others.

    On Windows, maybe try WordWeb?

    rd
     
    Rick Dooling, Jan 7, 2008
    #2
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  3. dgoldsmith_89 wrote:

    > Can anyone point me to a downloadable open source English dictionary
    > suitable for programmatic use with python: I'm programming a puzzle
    > generator, and I need to be able to generate more or less complete
    > lists of English words, alphabetized. Thanks! DG


    here's one:

    http://www.dcs.shef.ac.uk/research/ilash/Moby/

    </F>
     
    Fredrik Lundh, Jan 7, 2008
    #3
  4. On Jan 7, 2:46 pm, Rick Dooling <> wrote:
    > On Jan 7, 4:37 pm, dgoldsmith_89 <> wrote:
    >
    > > Can anyone point me to a downloadable open source English dictionary
    > > suitable for programmatic use with python: I'm programming a puzzle
    > > generator, and I need to be able to generate more or less complete
    > > lists of English words, alphabetized. Thanks! DG

    >
    > On Linux? WordNet and Dict and many others.
    >
    > On Windows, maybe try WordWeb?
    >
    > rd


    Sorry, didn't know it would make a difference: on Mac, actually.

    DG
     
    dgoldsmith_89, Jan 7, 2008
    #4
  5. dgoldsmith_89

    Guest

    On Jan 7, 4:37 pm, dgoldsmith_89 <> wrote:
    > Can anyone point me to a downloadable open source English dictionary
    > suitable for programmatic use with python: I'm programming a puzzle
    > generator, and I need to be able to generate more or less complete
    > lists of English words, alphabetized.  Thanks!  DG



    www.puzzlers.org has numerous word lists & dictionarys in text
    format that can be downloaded. I recommend you insert them into
    some form of database. I have most of them in an Access db and
    it's 95 MB. That's a worse case as I also have some value-added
    stuff, the OSPD alone would be a lot smaller.

    <http://www.puzzlers.org/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=solving:wordlists:start>
     
    , Jan 7, 2008
    #5
  6. dgoldsmith_89

    Tobiah Guest

    dgoldsmith_89 wrote:
    > Can anyone point me to a downloadable open source English dictionary
    > suitable for programmatic use with python: I'm programming a puzzle
    > generator, and I need to be able to generate more or less complete
    > lists of English words, alphabetized. Thanks! DG


    If all you want are the words themselves, then any linux box
    has a fairly complete list. I put mine here:

    http://tobiah.org/words.zip

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    Tobiah, Jan 7, 2008
    #6
  7. On Jan 7, 2:47 pm, Fredrik Lundh <> wrote:
    > dgoldsmith_89 wrote:
    > > Can anyone point me to a downloadable open source English dictionary
    > > suitable for programmatic use with python: I'm programming a puzzle
    > > generator, and I need to be able to generate more or less complete
    > > lists of English words, alphabetized. Thanks! DG

    >
    > here's one:
    >
    > http://www.dcs.shef.ac.uk/research/ilash/Moby/
    >
    > </F>


    Excellent, that'll do nicely! Thanks!!!

    DG
     
    dgoldsmith_89, Jan 7, 2008
    #7
  8. On Jan 7, 2:54 pm, "" <> wrote:
    > On Jan 7, 4:37 pm, dgoldsmith_89 <> wrote:
    >
    > > Can anyone point me to a downloadable open source English dictionary
    > > suitable for programmatic use with python: I'm programming a puzzle
    > > generator, and I need to be able to generate more or less complete
    > > lists of English words, alphabetized. Thanks! DG

    >
    > www.puzzlers.orghas numerous word lists & dictionarys in text
    > format that can be downloaded. I recommend you insert them into
    > some form of database. I have most of them in an Access db and
    > it's 95 MB. That's a worse case as I also have some value-added
    > stuff, the OSPD alone would be a lot smaller.
    >
    > <http://www.puzzlers.org/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=solving:wordlists:start>


    Sorry for my ignorance: I can query an Access DB w/ standard SQL
    queries (and this is how I would access it w/ Python)?

    DG
     
    dgoldsmith_89, Jan 7, 2008
    #8
  9. dgoldsmith_89

    Paul McGuire Guest

    On Jan 7, 5:10 pm, dgoldsmith_89 <> wrote:
    >
    > Sorry for my ignorance: I can query an Access DB w/ standard SQL
    > queries (and this is how I would access it w/ Python)?
    >
    > DG


    If you are running on a Mac, just use sqlite, it's built-in to Python
    as of v2.5 and you will find more help, documentation, and fellow
    Python+sqlite users than you will Python+Access.

    -- Paul
     
    Paul McGuire, Jan 7, 2008
    #9
  10. dgoldsmith_89

    Guest

    On Jan 7, 5:10 pm, dgoldsmith_89 <> wrote:
    > On Jan 7, 2:54 pm, "" <> wrote:
    >
    > > On Jan 7, 4:37 pm, dgoldsmith_89 <> wrote:

    >
    > > > Can anyone point me to a downloadable open source English dictionary
    > > > suitable for programmatic use with python: I'm programming a puzzle
    > > > generator, and I need to be able to generate more or less complete
    > > > lists of English words, alphabetized.  Thanks!  DG

    >
    > >www.puzzlers.orghasnumerous word lists & dictionarys in text
    > > format that can be downloaded. I recommend you insert them into
    > > some form of database. I have most of them in an Access db and
    > > it's 95 MB. That's a worse case as I also have some value-added
    > > stuff, the OSPD alone would be a lot smaller.

    >
    > > <http://www.puzzlers.org/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=solving:wordlists:start>

    >
    > Sorry for my ignorance: I can query an Access DB w/ standard SQL
    > queries (and this is how I would access it w/ Python)?


    Yes, if you have the appropriate way to link to the DB.
    I use Windows and ODBC from Win32. I don't know what you
    would use on a Mac.

    As Paul McGuire said, you could easily do this with SqlLite3.
    Personnaly, I always use Access since my job requires it
    and I find it much more convenient. I often use Crosstab
    tables which I think SqlLite3 doesn't support. Typically,
    I'll write complex queries in Access and simple select SQL
    statements in Python to grab them.

    Here's my anagram locator. (the [signature] is an example
    of the value-added I mentioned).

    ## I took a somewhat different approach. Instead of in a file,
    ## I've got my word list (562456 words) in an MS-Access database.
    ## And instead of calculating the signature on the fly, I did it
    ## once and added the signature as a second field:
    ##
    ## TABLE CONS_alpha_only_signature_unique
    ## --------------------------------------
    ## CONS text 75
    ## signature text 26
    ##
    ## The signature is a 26 character string where each character is
    ## the count of occurences of the matching letter. Luckily, in
    ## only a single case was there more than 9 occurences of any
    ## given letter, which turned not to be a word but a series of
    ## words concatenated so I just deleted it from the database
    ## (lots of crap in the original word list I used).
    ##
    ## Example:
    ##
    ## CONS signature
    ## aah 20000001000000000000000000 # 'a' occurs twice & 'h' once
    ## aahed 20011001000000000000000000
    ## aahing 20000011100001000000000000
    ## aahs 20000001000000000010000000
    ## aaii 20000000200000000000000000
    ## aaker 20001000001000000100000000
    ## aal 20000000000100000000000000
    ## aalborg 21000010000100100100000000
    ## aalesund
    20011000000101000010100000
    ##
    ## Any words with identical signatures must be anagrams.
    ##
    ## Once this was been set up, I wrote a whole bunch of queries
    ## to use this table. I use the normal Access drag and drop
    ## design, but the SQL can be extracted from each, so I can
    ## simply open the query from Python or I can grab the SQL
    ## and build it inside the program. The example
    ##
    ## signatures_anagrams_select_signature
    ##
    ## is hard coded for criteria 9 & 10 and should be cast inside
    ## Python so the criteria can be changed dynamically.
    ##
    ##
    ## QUERY signatures_anagrams_longest
    ## ---------------------------------
    ## SELECT Len([CONS]) AS Expr1,
    ## Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS) AS
    CountOfCONS,
    ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature
    ## FROM Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique
    ## GROUP BY Len([CONS]),
    ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature
    ## HAVING (((Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS))>1))
    ## ORDER BY Len([CONS]) DESC ,
    ## Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS) DESC;
    ##
    ## This is why I don't use SQLite3, must have crosstab queries.
    ##
    ## QUERY signatures_anagram_summary
    ## --------------------------------
    ## TRANSFORM Count(signatures_anagrams_longest.signature) AS
    CountOfsignature
    ## SELECT signatures_anagrams_longest.Expr1 AS [length of word]
    ## FROM signatures_anagrams_longest
    ## GROUP BY signatures_anagrams_longest.Expr1
    ## PIVOT signatures_anagrams_longest.CountOfCONS;
    ##
    ##
    ## QUERY signatures_anagrams_select_signature
    ## ------------------------------------------
    ## SELECT Len([CONS]) AS Expr1,
    ## Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS) AS
    CountOfCONS,
    ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature
    ## FROM Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique
    ## GROUP BY Len([CONS]),
    ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature
    ## HAVING (((Len([CONS]))=9) AND
    ## ((Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS))=10))
    ## ORDER BY Len([CONS]) DESC ,
    ## Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS) DESC;
    ##
    ## QUERY signatures_lookup_by_anagram_select_signature
    ## ---------------------------------------------------
    ## SELECT signatures_anagrams_select_signature.Expr1,
    ## signatures_anagrams_select_signature.CountOfCONS,
    ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS,
    ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature
    ## FROM signatures_anagrams_select_signature
    ## INNER JOIN Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique
    ## ON signatures_anagrams_select_signature.signature
    ## = Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature;
    ##
    ##
    ## Now it's a simple matter to use the ODBC from Win32 to extract
    ## the query output into Python.

    import dbi
    import odbc

    con = odbc.odbc("words")
    cursor = con.cursor()

    ## This first section grabs the anagram summary. Note that
    ## queries act just like tables (as long as they don't have
    ## internal dependencies. I read somewhere you can get the
    ## field names, but here I put them in by hand.

    ##cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM signature_anagram_summary")
    ##
    ##results = cursor.fetchall()
    ##
    ##for i in results:
    ## for j in i:
    ## print '%4s' % (str(j)),
    ## print

    ## (if this wraps, each line is 116 characters)
    ## 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
    14 15 16 17 18 23
    ## 2 259 None None None None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 3 487 348 218 150 102 None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 4 1343 718 398 236 142 101 51 26 25 9 8 3
    2 None None None None None
    ## 5 3182 1424 777 419 274 163 106 83 53 23 20 10
    6 4 5 1 3 1
    ## 6 5887 2314 1051 545 302 170 114 54 43 21 15 6
    5 4 4 2 None None
    ## 7 7321 2251 886 390 151 76 49 37 14 7 5 1
    1 1 None None None None
    ## 8 6993 1505 452 166 47 23 8 6 4 2 2 None
    None None None None None None
    ## 9 5127 830 197 47 17 6 None None 1 None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 10 2975 328 66 8 2 None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 11 1579 100 5 4 2 None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 12 781 39 2 1 None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 13 326 11 2 None None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 14 166 2 None None None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 15 91 None 1 None None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 16 60 None None None None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 17 35 None None None None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 18 24 None None None None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 19 11 None None None None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 20 6 None None None None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 21 6 None None None None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None
    ## 22 4 None None None None None None None None None None None
    None None None None None None

    ## From the query we have the word size as row header and size of
    ## anagram set as column header. The data value is the count of
    ## how many different anagram sets match the row/column header.
    ##
    ## For example, there are 7321 different 7-letter signatures that
    ## have 2 anagram sets. There is 1 5-letter signature having a
    ## 23 member anagram set.
    ##
    ## We can then pick any of these, say the single 10 member anagram
    ## set of 9-letter words, and query out out the anagrams:


    cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM
    signatures_lookup_by_anagram_select_signature")
    results = cursor.fetchall()
    for i in results:
    for j in i:
    print j,
    print

    ## 9 10 anoretics 10101000100001100111000000
    ## 9 10 atroscine 10101000100001100111000000
    ## 9 10 certosina 10101000100001100111000000
    ## 9 10 creations 10101000100001100111000000
    ## 9 10 narcotise 10101000100001100111000000
    ## 9 10 ostracine 10101000100001100111000000
    ## 9 10 reactions 10101000100001100111000000
    ## 9 10 secration 10101000100001100111000000
    ## 9 10 tinoceras 10101000100001100111000000
    ## 9 10 tricosane 10101000100001100111000000

    ## Nifty, eh?


    >
    > DG
     
    , Jan 7, 2008
    #10
  11. On Jan 7, 3:50 pm, "" <> wrote:
    > On Jan 7, 5:10 pm, dgoldsmith_89 <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jan 7, 2:54 pm, "" <> wrote:

    >
    > > > On Jan 7, 4:37 pm, dgoldsmith_89 <> wrote:

    >
    > > > > Can anyone point me to a downloadable open source English dictionary
    > > > > suitable for programmatic use with python: I'm programming a puzzle
    > > > > generator, and I need to be able to generate more or less complete
    > > > > lists of English words, alphabetized. Thanks! DG

    >
    > > >www.puzzlers.orghasnumerousword lists & dictionarys in text
    > > > format that can be downloaded. I recommend you insert them into
    > > > some form of database. I have most of them in an Access db and
    > > > it's 95 MB. That's a worse case as I also have some value-added
    > > > stuff, the OSPD alone would be a lot smaller.

    >
    > > > <http://www.puzzlers.org/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=solving:wordlists:start>

    >
    > > Sorry for my ignorance: I can query an Access DB w/ standard SQL
    > > queries (and this is how I would access it w/ Python)?

    >
    > Yes, if you have the appropriate way to link to the DB.
    > I use Windows and ODBC from Win32. I don't know what you
    > would use on a Mac.
    >
    > As Paul McGuire said, you could easily do this with SqlLite3.
    > Personnaly, I always use Access since my job requires it
    > and I find it much more convenient. I often use Crosstab
    > tables which I think SqlLite3 doesn't support. Typically,
    > I'll write complex queries in Access and simple select SQL
    > statements in Python to grab them.
    >
    > Here's my anagram locator. (the [signature] is an example
    > of the value-added I mentioned).
    >
    > ## I took a somewhat different approach. Instead of in a file,
    > ## I've got my word list (562456 words) in an MS-Access database.
    > ## And instead of calculating the signature on the fly, I did it
    > ## once and added the signature as a second field:
    > ##
    > ## TABLE CONS_alpha_only_signature_unique
    > ## --------------------------------------
    > ## CONS text 75
    > ## signature text 26
    > ##
    > ## The signature is a 26 character string where each character is
    > ## the count of occurences of the matching letter. Luckily, in
    > ## only a single case was there more than 9 occurences of any
    > ## given letter, which turned not to be a word but a series of
    > ## words concatenated so I just deleted it from the database
    > ## (lots of crap in the original word list I used).
    > ##
    > ## Example:
    > ##
    > ## CONS signature
    > ## aah 20000001000000000000000000 # 'a' occurs twice & 'h' once
    > ## aahed 20011001000000000000000000
    > ## aahing 20000011100001000000000000
    > ## aahs 20000001000000000010000000
    > ## aaii 20000000200000000000000000
    > ## aaker 20001000001000000100000000
    > ## aal 20000000000100000000000000
    > ## aalborg 21000010000100100100000000
    > ## aalesund
    > 20011000000101000010100000
    > ##
    > ## Any words with identical signatures must be anagrams.
    > ##
    > ## Once this was been set up, I wrote a whole bunch of queries
    > ## to use this table. I use the normal Access drag and drop
    > ## design, but the SQL can be extracted from each, so I can
    > ## simply open the query from Python or I can grab the SQL
    > ## and build it inside the program. The example
    > ##
    > ## signatures_anagrams_select_signature
    > ##
    > ## is hard coded for criteria 9 & 10 and should be cast inside
    > ## Python so the criteria can be changed dynamically.
    > ##
    > ##
    > ## QUERY signatures_anagrams_longest
    > ## ---------------------------------
    > ## SELECT Len([CONS]) AS Expr1,
    > ## Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS) AS
    > CountOfCONS,
    > ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature
    > ## FROM Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique
    > ## GROUP BY Len([CONS]),
    > ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature
    > ## HAVING (((Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS))>1))
    > ## ORDER BY Len([CONS]) DESC ,
    > ## Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS) DESC;
    > ##
    > ## This is why I don't use SQLite3, must have crosstab queries.
    > ##
    > ## QUERY signatures_anagram_summary
    > ## --------------------------------
    > ## TRANSFORM Count(signatures_anagrams_longest.signature) AS
    > CountOfsignature
    > ## SELECT signatures_anagrams_longest.Expr1 AS [length of word]
    > ## FROM signatures_anagrams_longest
    > ## GROUP BY signatures_anagrams_longest.Expr1
    > ## PIVOT signatures_anagrams_longest.CountOfCONS;
    > ##
    > ##
    > ## QUERY signatures_anagrams_select_signature
    > ## ------------------------------------------
    > ## SELECT Len([CONS]) AS Expr1,
    > ## Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS) AS
    > CountOfCONS,
    > ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature
    > ## FROM Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique
    > ## GROUP BY Len([CONS]),
    > ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature
    > ## HAVING (((Len([CONS]))=9) AND
    > ## ((Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS))=10))
    > ## ORDER BY Len([CONS]) DESC ,
    > ## Count(Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS) DESC;
    > ##
    > ## QUERY signatures_lookup_by_anagram_select_signature
    > ## ---------------------------------------------------
    > ## SELECT signatures_anagrams_select_signature.Expr1,
    > ## signatures_anagrams_select_signature.CountOfCONS,
    > ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.CONS,
    > ## Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature
    > ## FROM signatures_anagrams_select_signature
    > ## INNER JOIN Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique
    > ## ON signatures_anagrams_select_signature.signature
    > ## = Cons_alpha_only_signature_unique.signature;
    > ##
    > ##
    > ## Now it's a simple matter to use the ODBC from Win32 to extract
    > ## the query output into Python.
    >
    > import dbi
    > import odbc
    >
    > con = odbc.odbc("words")
    > cursor = con.cursor()
    >
    > ## This first section grabs the anagram summary. Note that
    > ## queries act just like tables (as long as they don't have
    > ## internal dependencies. I read somewhere you can get the
    > ## field names, but here I put them in by hand.
    >
    > ##cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM signature_anagram_summary")
    > ##
    > ##results = cursor.fetchall()
    > ##
    > ##for i in results:
    > ## for j in i:
    > ## print '%4s' % (str(j)),
    > ## print
    >
    > ## (if this wraps, each line is 116 characters)
    > ## 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
    > 14 15 16 17 18 23
    > ## 2 259 None None None None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 3 487 348 218 150 102 None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 4 1343 718 398 236 142 101 51 26 25 9 8 3
    > 2 None None None None None
    > ## 5 3182 1424 777 419 274 163 106 83 53 23 20 10
    > 6 4 5 1 3 1
    > ## 6 5887 2314 1051 545 302 170 114 54 43 21 15 6
    > 5 4 4 2 None None
    > ## 7 7321 2251 886 390 151 76 49 37 14 7 5 1
    > 1 1 None None None None
    > ## 8 6993 1505 452 166 47 23 8 6 4 2 2 None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 9 5127 830 197 47 17 6 None None 1 None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 10 2975 328 66 8 2 None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 11 1579 100 5 4 2 None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 12 781 39 2 1 None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 13 326 11 2 None None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 14 166 2 None None None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 15 91 None 1 None None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 16 60 None None None None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 17 35 None None None None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 18 24 None None None None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 19 11 None None None None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 20 6 None None None None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 21 6 None None None None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    > ## 22 4 None None None None None None None None None None None
    > None None None None None None
    >
    > ## From the query we have the word size as row header and size of
    > ## anagram set as column header. The data value is the count of
    > ## how many different anagram sets match the row/column header.
    > ##
    > ## For example, there are 7321 different 7-letter signatures that
    > ## have 2 anagram sets. There is 1 5-letter signature having a
    > ## 23 member anagram set.
    > ##
    > ## We can then pick any of these, say the single 10 member anagram
    > ## set of 9-letter words, and query out out the anagrams:
    >
    > cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM
    > signatures_lookup_by_anagram_select_signature")
    > results = cursor.fetchall()
    > for i in results:
    > for j in i:
    > print j,
    > print
    >
    > ## 9 10 anoretics 10101000100001100111000000
    > ## 9 10 atroscine 10101000100001100111000000
    > ## 9 10 certosina 10101000100001100111000000
    > ## 9 10 creations 10101000100001100111000000
    > ## 9 10 narcotise 10101000100001100111000000
    > ## 9 10 ostracine 10101000100001100111000000
    > ## 9 10 reactions 10101000100001100111000000
    > ## 9 10 secration 10101000100001100111000000
    > ## 9 10 tinoceras 10101000100001100111000000
    > ## 9 10 tricosane 10101000100001100111000000
    >
    > ## Nifty, eh?
    >
    >
    >
    > > DG


    Yes, nifty. Thanks for all the help, all!

    DG
     
    dgoldsmith_89, Jan 8, 2008
    #11
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  3. IchBin
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    795
  4. globalrev

    free dictionary english - spanish?

    globalrev, May 16, 2008, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    386
    globalrev
    May 16, 2008
  5. Goutham DL

    English dictionary

    Goutham DL, May 28, 2008, in forum: C++
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    377
    Goutham DL
    May 28, 2008
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