OpenJMS

Discussion in 'Java' started by Robert M. Gary, Feb 19, 2008.

  1. I'm curious what other's experiences have been with OpenJMS. I'm
    looking for a "vender neutral" JMS so I can provide services to my
    customers who implement on a variety of App Servers. I thought I could
    standardize on OpenJMS since they could all interact with it (vs me
    having to provide a service to each vender's JMS). This is a
    commercial product and I'm a bit concerned that OpenJMS says its still
    in beta and doesn't see to have any work done on it in about a year.
    Is it stable enough for commercial use??

    -Roberrt
    Robert M. Gary, Feb 19, 2008
    #1
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  2. On Tue, 19 Feb 2008 10:33:32 -0800 (PST), Robert M. Gary wrote:

    > I'm curious what other's experiences have been with OpenJMS. I'm
    > looking for a "vender neutral" JMS so I can provide services to my
    > customers who implement on a variety of App Servers. I thought I could
    > standardize on OpenJMS since they could all interact with it (vs me
    > having to provide a service to each vender's JMS). This is a
    > commercial product and I'm a bit concerned that OpenJMS says its still
    > in beta and doesn't see to have any work done on it in about a year.
    > Is it stable enough for commercial use??
    >
    > -Roberrt



    We use it to broadcast changes made on a java thick swing client to all the
    other clients that are currently logged on in realtime.
    It's a really old version, maybe 5 years.
    We use flat file persistence rather than the preferred db schema as it was
    originally just a proof of concept that ended up staying in the final
    product.
    It's never given us any problems and is quite quick and light so I'd have
    to say we've found it ok though it's not doing anything very heavy or
    complicated, possibly 50 clients worldwide on an intranet.
    I agree that there doesn't seem to be any work being done on it, I reckon
    it's pretty much been left behind by J2EE vendor JMSs and things like tibco
    EMS.
    Richard Reynolds, Feb 19, 2008
    #2
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  3. Robert M. Gary

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    Robert M. Gary wrote:
    > I'm curious what other's experiences have been with OpenJMS. I'm
    > looking for a "vender neutral" JMS so I can provide services to my
    > customers who implement on a variety of App Servers. I thought I could
    > standardize on OpenJMS since they could all interact with it (vs me
    > having to provide a service to each vender's JMS). This is a
    > commercial product and I'm a bit concerned that OpenJMS says its still
    > in beta and doesn't see to have any work done on it in about a year.
    > Is it stable enough for commercial use??


    JMS is an API and is always 100% vendor neutral.

    Various message queue specific implementation exist.

    But that should not bother you in your Java EE app.

    You lookup the message queue by name and access it via the JMS API
    no matter what implementation it is.

    Some customers will prefer to use their existing message queue
    infrastructure.

    Other customers will prefer you to deliver a complete solution.

    For the last category you may want to look for a free message
    queue implementation with JMS support.

    Several such exist.

    OpenJMS would not be on my short list.

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Feb 19, 2008
    #3
  4. On Feb 19, 3:55 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:

    > But that should not bother you in your Java EE app.


    Im not an EE app, I just want to publish on the JMS buss so customers
    can subscribe.

    > You lookup the message queue by name and access it via the JMS API
    > no matter what implementation it is.


    The JMS specifications claim its not a wire protocol and say the wire
    implemention is up to the implementer. Are you saying this is not
    true?

    > Some customers will prefer to use their existing message queue
    > infrastructure.


    So you are saying I could choose to use, say JBoss and publish a
    message on the JMS buss that is read by my customer running Web Logic,
    etc? What specifications would JBoss and WebLogic use to talk to each
    other, I don't see that specification, only an API specification.

    -robert
    Robert M. Gary, Feb 20, 2008
    #4
  5. Robert M. Gary

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    Robert M. Gary wrote:
    > On Feb 19, 3:55 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    >> But that should not bother you in your Java EE app.

    >
    > Im not an EE app, I just want to publish on the JMS buss so customers
    > can subscribe.


    It is easier doing EE stuff inside an EE container than outside.

    >> You lookup the message queue by name and access it via the JMS API
    >> no matter what implementation it is.

    >
    > The JMS specifications claim its not a wire protocol and say the wire
    > implemention is up to the implementer. Are you saying this is not
    > true?


    No.

    >> Some customers will prefer to use their existing message queue
    >> infrastructure.

    >
    > So you are saying I could choose to use, say JBoss and publish a
    > message on the JMS buss that is read by my customer running Web Logic,
    > etc? What specifications would JBoss and WebLogic use to talk to each
    > other, I don't see that specification, only an API specification.


    So we have:

    your Java SE app----Foobar MQ----XYZ Java EE app on ABC app server

    the admin for the ABC app server deploys Foobar MQ client lib
    and bind a name to the Foobar MQ servive

    the developer og XYZ Java EE app just look up the queue by name
    and uses the standard JMS API so the code is independent of
    implementation

    your Java SE app will need to have the Foobar MQ client lib
    in classpath and you will need to somehow do something
    Foobar MQ specific to get the connection but can do all
    the rest using the standard JMS API

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Feb 20, 2008
    #5
  6. On Feb 19, 4:37 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    > Robert M. Gary wrote:
    > So we have:
    >
    > your Java SE app----Foobar MQ----XYZ Java EE app on ABC app server
    >
    > the admin for the ABC app server deploys Foobar MQ client lib
    > and bind a name to the Foobar MQ servive

    ...
    > your Java SE app will need to have the Foobar MQ client lib
    > in classpath and you will need to somehow do something
    > Foobar MQ specific to get the connection but can do all
    > the rest using the standard JMS API


    I did consider that but with 300 customers in 40 countries I don't
    want to be in the business of having to support every App Server that
    a customer can find. In my smaller customers I may be able to dictate
    their App Server but not in the larger customers. That is what got me
    thinking about OpenJMS. I figure I could tell them that I'm using
    OpenJMS and they could interact with that and I wouldn't be dictating
    their App Server vender.

    -Robert
    Robert M. Gary, Feb 20, 2008
    #6
  7. Robert M. Gary

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    Robert M. Gary wrote:
    > On Feb 19, 4:37 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    >> Robert M. Gary wrote:
    >> So we have:
    >>
    >> your Java SE app----Foobar MQ----XYZ Java EE app on ABC app server
    >>
    >> the admin for the ABC app server deploys Foobar MQ client lib
    >> and bind a name to the Foobar MQ servive

    > ...
    >> your Java SE app will need to have the Foobar MQ client lib
    >> in classpath and you will need to somehow do something
    >> Foobar MQ specific to get the connection but can do all
    >> the rest using the standard JMS API

    >
    > I did consider that but with 300 customers in 40 countries I don't
    > want to be in the business of having to support every App Server that
    > a customer can find. In my smaller customers I may be able to dictate
    > their App Server but not in the larger customers. That is what got me
    > thinking about OpenJMS. I figure I could tell them that I'm using
    > OpenJMS and they could interact with that and I wouldn't be dictating
    > their App Server vender.


    You do not have to tell them what app server to use. You just
    need to give them the client libs for the message queue you are
    using and let them config it in their app server.

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Feb 20, 2008
    #7
  8. On Feb 19, 6:34 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    > Robert M. Gary wrote:


    > You do not have to tell them what app server to use. You just
    > need to give them the client libs for the message queue you are
    > using and let them config it in their app server.


    That's basically what I would be doing with OpenJMS I think. I figured
    it would be better to use something like OpenJMS because it wouldn't
    come with the baggage of an App Server. That way they wouldn't need to
    load the libraries for another App Server in their App Server, just a
    little library for the JMS. Am I missing something?

    -Robert
    Robert M. Gary, Feb 20, 2008
    #8
  9. Robert M. Gary

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    Robert M. Gary wrote:
    > On Feb 19, 6:34 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    >> Robert M. Gary wrote:
    >> You do not have to tell them what app server to use. You just
    >> need to give them the client libs for the message queue you are
    >> using and let them config it in their app server.

    >
    > That's basically what I would be doing with OpenJMS I think. I figured
    > it would be better to use something like OpenJMS because it wouldn't
    > come with the baggage of an App Server. That way they wouldn't need to
    > load the libraries for another App Server in their App Server, just a
    > little library for the JMS. Am I missing something?


    I would expect most (probably all) message queue's supporting JMS to
    come with an app server independent client lib.

    Nothing special about OpenJMS for that.

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Feb 20, 2008
    #9
  10. On Feb 19, 7:22 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    > Robert M. Gary wrote:
    > > On Feb 19, 6:34 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    > >> Robert M. Gary wrote:
    > >> You do not have to tell them what app server to use. You just
    > >> need to give them the client libs for the message queue you are
    > >> using and let them config it in their app server.

    >
    > > That's basically what I would be doing with OpenJMS I think. I figured
    > > it would be better to use something like OpenJMS because it wouldn't
    > > come with the baggage of an App Server. That way they wouldn't need to
    > > load the libraries for another App Server in their App Server, just a
    > > little library for the JMS. Am I missing something?

    >
    > I would expect most (probably all) message queue's supporting JMS to
    > come with an app server independent client lib.
    >
    > Nothing special about OpenJMS for that.


    Interesting. I hadn't thought about that. I guess that's why I post
    these things to USENET. I'll look into doing that.

    -Robert
    Robert M. Gary, Feb 20, 2008
    #10
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