OT: game programmer SALARY

Discussion in 'Java' started by Bo, Sep 22, 2004.

  1. Bo

    Bo Guest

    Hi

    I will discuss job offer with a game company soon. Please post how
    much I should bargain for.

    -job title: port engineer (j2me, Brew phone games)
    -at San Francisco

    Me:
    -fresh out of college
    -I think they hired me because I made an impressive 3D engine in Java.
    But because '3d engine programmer' pays more than people who ports,
    they will still offer the job to me as a port engineer.
    -If there is info on '3d engine programmer' for phones please provide
    it.

    thnx!
     
    Bo, Sep 22, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. In article <>,
    (Bo) wrote:

    > Hi
    >
    > I will discuss job offer with a game company soon. Please post how
    > much I should bargain for.


    Good luck, and congrats. This would be many people's dream job.

    > -job title: port engineer (j2me, Brew phone games)
    > -at San Francisco


    Ok - the very best thing you can do is ask friends who graduated the
    year before with your major and grades what they are getting. They may
    tell, they may not.

    Why your major and your grades? Because many companies will determine
    what they pay based on what they think they can get you for. If you
    came out with a physics degree, as I did, then they are going to rightly
    assume that you are less inundated with job offers than the engineering
    students down the hall. You can often work around that, but it is darn
    good to know what salary is being paid to people who look like you do to
    a recruiter.

    Then, try to guess whether the company is about the norm for the
    industry, or perhaps a bit cash starved, or perhaps flush. A good way
    to tell is to scan the desks of the people you interview with. Is the
    equipment reasonably up to date? Do they have lots of reference books?
    Ask about conferences people have gone to? At most places I consult
    for, ref books are common, only senior people go to conferences, and two
    year old equipment is still in very active use.

    Assuming about the norm, then try looking up salary surveys. They tend
    to be a bit unreliable, as the categories are often a bit screwy, but
    they might help. For example, at many companies, an analyst gets paid
    more than a programmer, as analysts design, while programmers implement
    methods given an exact spec. At others, they have the job title, but
    there is little meaning to it.

    > Me:
    > -fresh out of college


    In all honesty, you are going to learn so much in the first two years
    that it almost does not matter what you make, as long as it is
    reasonable for the industry, and they are doing something that can be
    applied to the next job. That next job may be with the same people, or
    with different ones.

    Thus, try to make something reasonable compared with your compatriots,
    but concentrate on the tools, the techniques, and whether the job and
    the people sound like a good fit.

    Whatever you do, though, get any extra cookies in writing, like "I will
    get 5% raise in six months if my code meets objective performance
    criteria negotiated in the first two weeks. This is seperate from my
    annual review." or "I will be sent to JavaOne each year on company time
    and money." or "I will be given unpaid leave to go to JavaOne each year
    without counting against my vacation and sick time." Again, negotiate
    for what matters, but try to make it really clear just what you expect,
    and what you provide.

    > -I think they hired me because I made an impressive 3D engine in Java.
    > But because '3d engine programmer' pays more than people who ports,
    > they will still offer the job to me as a port engineer.


    Also, until you have proven yourself on their code base, they may want
    their own engine guy to keep an eye on you. Many who have written great
    code do a terrible job on a team.

    > -If there is info on '3d engine programmer' for phones please provide
    > it.


    Do be aware - that platform is inexpensive, so the bucks rarely roll in.
    On the plus side, a company can sell a lot of different products rather
    than one massive one. Try to find out how many projects you are going
    to be working on, how long they last, and how they are reviewed. This
    goes a long way towards keeping you sane.

    Scott
     
    Scott Ellsworth, Sep 22, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Bo

    Tom Sloper Guest

    Re: game programmer SALARY

    "Bo" <> wrote...

    > I will discuss job offer with a game company soon. Please post how
    > much I should bargain for.
    > -fresh out of college


    Bo, read the game industry Salary Survey at
    http://www.gamasutra.com/features/20040211/olsen_01.shtml
    If you have to register to access that site, DO IT.
    You do not have any bargaining power. They'll make you an offer. TAKE IT.
    You can always "bargain" with the next employer.

    Good luck getting the job - Tom

    --

    Tom Sloper - Game Designer, Producer, Consultant
    - Sloperama Productions. Services for game developers and publishers;
    "Making Games Fun, And Getting Them Done."
    http://www.sloperama.com/business.html.
    - Helpful information for game industry hopefuls; a new article every month.
    http://www.sloperama.com/advice.html.
     
    Tom Sloper, Sep 23, 2004
    #3
  4. Bo

    Yakov Guest

    Send your resume to several job agencies. If they will call you back,
    ask them what's would be a reasonable salary for a person with your
    skills. If nobody calls you back, this means that your chances of
    getting any job are slim, so tell your gaming company that you are
    open for any fair offer and take it!

    Regards,
    Yakov
     
    Yakov, Sep 23, 2004
    #4
  5. In article <>,
    Scott Ellsworth <> wrote:

    > > I will discuss job offer with a game company soon. Please post how
    > > much I should bargain for.

    >
    > Good luck, and congrats. This would be many people's dream job.
    >
    > > -job title: port engineer (j2me, Brew phone games)
    > > -at San Francisco

    >
    > Ok - the very best thing you can do is ask friends who graduated the
    > year before with your major and grades what they are getting. They may
    > tell, they may not.


    Or you could ask the HR person at the company "what is the salary range
    for this position?"

    There's really nothing you can do about it, anyway -- but if you know
    that the range is from X to Y, you can at least get a feel for what they
    think of your skills by where they offer you in that range.

    While I agree with the other poster that ~40k is about right for a
    college hire, they might try to come in slightly below that, on the
    thought that giving you a raise from 39,800 to 40,200, while it's
    ridiculously small (1%), has a large "feel" to it, in that it crosses
    the 40k boundary.

    Also, don't get caught up in nit-picky -- if you want 40k and they're
    offering 39,800, don't make a big deal over $200/yr ($4/week!) What you
    MIGHT do, if they offer less than you indicate you'd like, is ask "what
    incentive programs are available to me to help me make up the difference
    (bonuses, etc), and what do I have to do to get them?"

    The question's not as flip as it may sound -- if a company thinks you're
    worth $35k and you think you're worth $45k, but they obviously feel that
    SOMEONE is worth $45k (or more -- even $55k!), ask point blank "what
    skills do I need to demonstrate to be the kind of person that you pay
    $55k?" Or, if you're feeling fancy, "I feel I'm worth $45k, and I'd
    like a chance to prove it to you. Tell me what skills I need to
    demonstrate in the first three months in order to get a retroactive
    salary increase." (No one will offer you a retroactive salary increase,
    but they may be willing to offer a normal increase, and a bonus for the
    difference.)

    The point is: everything is negotiable. Don't try to over-sell what you
    have, and don't let them try to under-bid what they're getting.

    Luck!

    --
    Please take off your shoes before arriving at my in-box.
    I will not, no matter how "good" the deal, patronise any business which sends
    unsolicited commercial e-mail or that advertises in discussion newsgroups.
     
    Miss Elaine Eos, Sep 23, 2004
    #5
  6. Bo

    Raghar Guest

    (Bo) wrote in
    news::

    > Hi
    >
    > I will discuss job offer with a game company soon. Please post
    > how much I should bargain for.


    You shouldn't if is it your first job. (Of course if you are
    dealing with people that would like to have a new house... And your
    low sallary would add a little money for that...)

    >
    > -job title: port engineer (j2me, Brew phone games)
    > -at San Francisco
    >
    > Me:
    > -fresh out of college
    > -I think they hired me because I made an impressive 3D engine in
    > Java. But because '3d engine programmer' pays more than people
    > who ports, they will still offer the job to me as a port
    > engineer. -If there is info on '3d engine programmer' for phones
    > please provide it.
    >
    > thnx!


    They should teach you write sentences more gently. It looks like
    letter from 16 year old baseball player.

    Of course if they would pay you enough for food, rent, and a little
    savings, it would be nice.


    --
    Kizutsuite 'ta ano hi kara
     
    Raghar, Sep 27, 2004
    #6
  7. Bo

    Lin Ke-Fong Guest

    > > -job title: port engineer (j2me, Brew phone games) -at San Francisco
    > Is this at Digital Chocolate?


    If it is, you may want to stay away:

    http://www.ferrago.com/story/2366

    Read the comments.
     
    Lin Ke-Fong, Oct 3, 2004
    #7
  8. Bo

    Phlip Guest

    Lin Ke-Fong wrote:

    > > > -job title: port engineer (j2me, Brew phone games) -at San Francisco

    > > Is this at Digital Chocolate?

    >
    > If it is, you may want to stay away:
    >
    > http://www.ferrago.com/story/2366
    >
    > Read the comments.


    Ouch. Someone has the bad kind of money addiction there.

    My advice to the OP is to take the job, for whatever pay, and then
    _immediately_ start looking for the next job. Use that shop as leverage and
    resume fodder, not as a carreer path. Some bosses simply cannot be trusted,
    whether or not their company is successful.

    (Wish I had taken that advice myself a while back!)

    --
    Phlip
    http://industrialxp.org/community/bin/view/Main/TestFirstUserInterfaces
     
    Phlip, Oct 3, 2004
    #8
  9. Bo

    Signal9 Guest

    Raghar <> wrote in message news:<Xns9571EA39C466Raghar@195.250.128.45>...
    > (Bo) wrote in
    > news::
    >
    > > Hi
    > >
    > > I will discuss job offer with a game company soon. Please post
    > > how much I should bargain for.

    >
    > You shouldn't if is it your first job. (Of course if you are
    > dealing with people that would like to have a new house... And your
    > low sallary would add a little money for that...)
    >
    > >
    > > -job title: port engineer (j2me, Brew phone games)
    > > -at San Francisco
    > >
    > > Me:
    > > -fresh out of college
    > > -I think they hired me because I made an impressive 3D engine in
    > > Java. But because '3d engine programmer' pays more than people
    > > who ports, they will still offer the job to me as a port
    > > engineer. -If there is info on '3d engine programmer' for phones
    > > please provide it.
    > >
    > > thnx!

    >
    > They should teach you write sentences more gently. It looks like
    > letter from 16 year old baseball player.
    >
    > Of course if they would pay you enough for food, rent, and a little
    > savings, it would be nice.



    Well do not be too upset but game developers make the least amount of
    money in the industry. But I will tell you one important fact.... Do
    what you enjoy !

    if you want to be a game developer then do so ! do not get hung up on
    the money right away...

    I also did game development in school, wrote a DX9 game engine in C++
    (took around 3 months to learn DX9 API and then write the engine, with
    sound and other components), but when i finished school I decided it
    was better to write enterprise level business applications.
     
    Signal9, Oct 16, 2004
    #9
  10. Bo

    tarun321

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1
    career in gaming

    Careers in Gaming

    A key factor restricting the growth of animation and gaming in India is the scarcity of skilled professionals. Come to the Careers in Gaming Track at IGDS 2010 to learn about facets such as What type of education you need to land that job? What type of portfolio you should put together? How do you make contacts and network from the Global Game Development community? What are standard hiring practices? You will also hear the various Gaming companies on the plans and methods they are adopting to attract and motivate individual talents, as well as strategies employed in game development and /or operation studios. Find out more about how to participate at India Game Developer Summit 2010 to be held on Saturday, February 27th in Bangalore at gamedevelopersummit[dot]com. The summit is endorsed by IGDA (International Game Developer Association). Companies participating in this conference include Adobe, Ubisoft, Gameshastra, HP, Tata and others.
     
    tarun321, Jan 13, 2010
    #10
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. BlackHawke
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    1,620
    Andrew Thompson
    Jan 26, 2004
  2. java_killer
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,002
    Kevin McMurtrie
    May 10, 2008
  3. java_killer
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    473
    java_killer
    May 9, 2008
  4. Sanny
    Replies:
    391
    Views:
    42,836
    anish.mathew84
    Jan 6, 2010
  5. Sanny
    Replies:
    396
    Views:
    7,298
    Noah Roberts
    Dec 17, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page