OT: guidelines for splitting images

Discussion in 'HTML' started by mscir, Jan 14, 2004.

  1. mscir

    mscir Guest

    I'm working on a site that will have some large graphics on the home
    page. Any suggestions about max image size or any other guidelines
    before I start dicing up the images? Also I was wondering why this is
    preferable to using larger progressive jpg's.

    TIA,
    Mike
    mscir, Jan 14, 2004
    #1
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  2. mscir

    brucie Guest

    in post: <news:>
    mscir <> said:

    > I'm working on a site that will have some large graphics on the home
    > page.


    not a good idea. you have about 8-10 seconds before the visitor hits
    their back button.

    > Any suggestions about max image size


    you should try to keep your front page in total (including all images,
    css, JS etc) around 30-40k.

    > or any other guidelines before I start dicing up the images?


    don't bother.

    > Also I was wondering why this is preferable to using larger
    > progressive jpg's.


    its not, its a myth. it takes longer and consumes more bandwidth
    downloading multiple images that just the one.


    --
    brucie
    brucie, Jan 14, 2004
    #2
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  3. mscir

    Cameron Guest

    mscir wrote:
    > I'm working on a site that will have some large graphics on the home
    > page. Any suggestions about max image size or any other guidelines
    > before I start dicing up the images? Also I was wondering why this is
    > preferable to using larger progressive jpg's.
    >
    > TIA,
    > Mike
    >


    It was devised as a way to try and make it harder for people copying
    images, presumably.

    ~Cameron
    Cameron, Jan 14, 2004
    #3
  4. mscir wrote:

    > I'm working on a site that will have some large graphics on the home
    > page. Any suggestions about max image size or any other guidelines
    > before I start dicing up the images? Also I was wondering why this is
    > preferable to using larger progressive jpg's.


    It's not. Although my knowledge of image compression techniques is
    somewhat limited, I believe the total size of an image will generally go
    *up* by splitting it in two, especially when HTTP headers are added. The
    are some exceptions probably.

    Of course, you do gain an advantage with two images: the browser can
    download them simultaneously, which could result in a small speed gain.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me - http://www.goddamn.co.uk/tobyink/?page=132
    Toby A Inkster, Jan 14, 2004
    #4
  5. mscir

    rf Guest

    Re: guidelines for splitting images

    "mscir" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm working on a site that will have some large graphics on the home
    > page. Any suggestions about max image size or any other guidelines
    > before I start dicing up the images? Also I was wondering why this is
    > preferable to using larger progressive jpg's.


    Slicing up images does not decrease the download time, it actually increases
    it.

    The same amount of data has to come down, well more actually: the jpeg
    overhead in each file adds to the total.

    Then you must add in the extra TCP/IP overhead - more return trips to the
    host, more packets etc.

    Cheers
    Richard.
    rf, Jan 15, 2004
    #5
  6. mscir

    mscir Guest

    Thanks guys.

    Toby A Inkster wrote:
    > mscir wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I'm working on a site that will have some large graphics on the home
    >>page. Any suggestions about max image size or any other guidelines
    >>before I start dicing up the images? Also I was wondering why this is
    >>preferable to using larger progressive jpg's.

    >
    >
    > It's not. Although my knowledge of image compression techniques is
    > somewhat limited, I believe the total size of an image will generally go
    > *up* by splitting it in two, especially when HTTP headers are added. The
    > are some exceptions probably.
    >
    > Of course, you do gain an advantage with two images: the browser can
    > download them simultaneously, which could result in a small speed gain.
    >
    mscir, Jan 15, 2004
    #6
  7. In article Toby A Inkster wrote:
    > mscir wrote:
    >
    > > I'm working on a site that will have some large graphics on the home
    > > page. Any suggestions about max image size or any other guidelines
    > > before I start dicing up the images? Also I was wondering why this is
    > > preferable to using larger progressive jpg's.

    >
    > It's not. Although my knowledge of image compression techniques is
    > somewhat limited, I believe the total size of an image will generally go
    > *up* by splitting it in two, especially when HTTP headers are added. The
    > are some exceptions probably.


    Yes. It makes sence, if you have something like low contrast photo/color-
    glide on background and small logo/text on the other end. Then when you
    save photo using jpg and logo using png, and can get serious size
    reduction.
    (as you can use much higher progression for jpg and logo with few colors
    as png don't take much)

    Of course, in such case, it was wrong to do image as one from beginning.

    > Of course, you do gain an advantage with two images: the browser can
    > download them simultaneously, which could result in a small speed gain.


    And, you can make it wrap... Something like this:
    http://www.student.oulu.fi/~laurirai/www/css/examples/img_after.html

    It fits very narrow window. (but I don't think it makes sence just
    because size reduction, that is pretty small, IIRC 1.7kB)

    (I'm having problem with antialias on wrapped image, as I got that image
    ready made, so it is not easiest task to change...)

    --
    Lauri Raittila <http://www.iki.fi/lr> <http://www.iki.fi/zwak/fonts>
    Saapi lähettää meiliä, jos aihe ei liity ryhmään, tai on yksityinen
    tjsp., mutta älä lähetä samaa viestiä meilitse ja ryhmään.
    Lauri Raittila, Jan 15, 2004
    #7
  8. mscir

    Whitecrest Guest

    In article <bu4gng$468$>, lid
    says...
    > It was devised as a way to try and make it harder for people copying
    > images, presumably.


    Why? Are your images really that good that I would want to steal them?

    --
    Whitecrest Entertainment
    www.whitecrestent.com
    Whitecrest, Jan 15, 2004
    #8
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