[OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance" project.

Discussion in 'Python' started by Richard Hanson, Sep 23, 2004.

  1. While this post is primarily off-topic, I'm using Python to test
    ideas, and hopefully, to develop a prototype for the project. I've
    noticed that this group is frequented by some of the finer minds in
    compsci; this post relates to HCIs and possible improvements to such.
    But, be all that as it may, if this project can be shot down -- this
    is where I'd prefer it to be done. :)

    (I've been very impressed with the civil adult behavior here. Polite
    *and* humorous -- my kind of people! In any event, I apologize if
    anyone is offended by my posting of this, here.)

    I had hoped to not announce until I had a minimal prototype ready.
    However, my quickly disappearing time resources are being "devoured by
    locusts"[1], some time-resources spent just trying to keep online
    access, what with my current stable of failing Windows-based (alas)
    computers and the current trend towards complexity rather than
    simplicity in the world.

    (Python is the epitome of complexity-controlling languages; I think it
    appropriate that this project which aims to markedly simplify the
    complexity of the user interface [no lofty aspirations, here :) ], be
    done in Python.)

    ---

    My project, "code-named" Pathfinder, is planned as a computing
    appliance with "all batteries included" which answers 95%, say, of the
    typical user's computing needs. It would be convenient for both the
    "power user" and Grandma. Such arcana as harddrives, directories,
    files, OS vs. apps distinctions, etc. would be hidden from user view.
    (Some of these items wouldn't even need to exist under-the-covers.)
    Something like Pathfinder could ultimately be, perhaps, the Model-T of
    the not-yet-here Computer Age (with lots of help designing and
    implementing such, of course).

    (If you think I'm deluded -- you may well be right <wink> -- but read
    on. HCI was my main area of interest back in my active [i.e., under
    employment] programming days. Laziness, and now "mouser's arm," have
    been, and still are, my main sources of inspiration. :) )

    ---

    One of the goals of Pathfinder is to have an integrated OS and system
    on flash ROM, say, totally separated from user data (user data being
    automatically and redundantly backed up transparently to the user)
    with the system supplying the more commonly needed functionality in an
    integrated manner. For example, Pathfinder would not allow apps to be
    added by the user -- no need, as virtually all batteries are provided.
    Authorized upgrades of the system ROM would still be allowed by the
    spec.

    Another part of Pathfinder is a perhaps better HCI -- no need to steer
    a mouse all around the screen just to arrive at some point which could
    have been immediately gone to. And no need for sixteen ways to do
    everything. Instead, a touchscreen-and-stylus, and an array of
    dynamically labeled buttons in a panel on one side of the
    browser-detail pane, would be the primary *one way* (other than the
    keyboard) to interact with the system. (Detail views in the adjacent
    browser-detail pane *may* need to have additional controls depending
    on the object type: AV, text, PIM, etc.)

    The dynamically labeled buttons would either evoke some action as a
    "leaf," or evoke a new "sub-menu" of newly labeled buttons (ala the
    "softmenu" keys of the HP28 and HP48 series calculators).

    The browser-pane view, using only the dynamic button-panel and a few
    screen-taps, could be "narrowed-down" from the all-objects, global
    view to a very select, subset view through filter, sort, and attribute
    selection. In this way, the desired "needle in an increasingly more
    humongous haystack" could be found with only a few screen-taps of the
    button-panel. Once an object (user or user-configuration data), or a
    set of such, is in view, a few more button-panel taps could add (or
    modify) the object(s) attributes as desired to "add value" for future,
    further ease-of-use.

    Basically, the current windows-icons-mouse-pointer interface would be
    entirely replaced by the "button panel" and touchscreen. (A mouse
    could substitute for the touchscreen in the interim as the project is
    being prototyped on conventional platforms.) No more menubars,
    taskbars, Start Menus, endless series of dialog boxes, steering around
    cascading menus, etc. With only a few dynamically labeled buttons,
    say, properly nested in a sensible but easily changeable tree,
    "zillions" of leaves of tasks, filters, orders, attributes, etc. could
    be reached with only a few screen-taps.

    The project would be open-source, of course. (Not sure how any
    eventual hardware could be open-sourced...?) I have more to say about
    the specs and philosophy of the project if anyone is interested. (I've
    had this project on the back burner throughout a seven-year-long
    family reunion book undertaking; only now can I apply my available
    resources without *that* distraction, however.) Contact me off-group
    if you've a mind to.

    Thanks very much if you have read all the way through this... uh...
    something or other.


    for-posterity-in-an-ever-increasingly-complex-world'ly y'rs,
    Richard Hanson
    _______________________________________________
    [1] "Borrowed" from Jerry Pournelle's frequent usage.

    Note: I could edit this forever, but I'm punching SEND, now -- ypoes
    and such are thrown in for free. ;-)

    --
    sick<PERI0D>old<P0INT>fart<PIE-DEC0-SYMB0L>newsguy<MARK>com
     
    Richard Hanson, Sep 23, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance"project.

    I really like this kind of stuff. Information management, knowledge
    management, complexity management, you name it -- it's a increasingly
    interesting topic. Appliances also are relevant, as it is seamless
    networking.

    I heed you to check Microsoft's documents on "how Longhorn will be
    great" :) Seriously, they're working hard to create a new paradigm
    for the Windows desktop, and some of the things that you talk about
    are discussed there too -- namely, they're hiding folders, drive
    names, etc, from the user view, and creating a new and much simplified
    user interface. Google is known to be working on something similar --
    your computer will be just a big Google-indexed repository of
    information. No more trying to file things into folders, Google will
    categorize and locate things back for you in a snap.

    A project of this size is really big and ambitious. A suggestion is to
    create a new mailing list and to start discussing it there. If it's in
    Python, I'm sure you can thrown baits here at c.l.py from time to time
    to hook new people :)

    --
    Carlos Ribeiro
    Consultoria em Projetos
    blog: http://rascunhosrotos.blogspot.com
    blog: http://pythonnotes.blogspot.com
    mail:
    mail:
     
    Carlos Ribeiro, Sep 23, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance"project.

    > I heed you to check Microsoft's documents on "how Longhorn will be
    > great" :) Seriously, they're working hard to create a new paradigm
    > for the Windows desktop, and some of the things that you talk about
    > are discussed there too -- namely, they're hiding folders, drive
    > names, etc, from the user view, and creating a new and much simplified
    > user interface.

    Fortunately, Apple has been working even harder and is already there
    with Tiger:
    http://www.apple.com/macosx/tiger/spotlight.html
    http://www.apple.com/macosx/tiger/search_finder.html


    > My project, "code-named" Pathfinder

    Just be aware, there is also a Mac program called Pathfinder, in case
    you wanted to keep the name...


    Ksenia.
     
    Ksenia Marasanova, Sep 23, 2004
    #3
  4. Nice to find that my off-topic post was taking seriously even if I
    *did* use lots of smileys and such -- as well as positing a possibly
    seemingly grandiose set of ideas. :)

    Carlos Ribeiro wrote:

    > I really like this kind of stuff. Information management, knowledge
    > management, complexity management, you name it -- it's a increasingly
    > interesting topic. Appliances also are relevant, as it is seamless
    > networking.


    Check on all the above -- and many thanks for the kind words and vote
    of confidence.

    It is my thesis that the world is experiencing a "complexity bomb" if
    you will -- a combinatorial explosion of complexity in all things --
    and that compsci has been dealing with managing complexity for
    decades, and that if the world doesn't turn to the complexity-control
    experts (compsci folks), then things may well be grim in the coming
    years.

    I've long been frustrated, though, that even in the computer industry,
    the mainstream has gone the WIMPy way :) -- instead of continuing to
    innovate re HCIs. While I have personal, selfish reasons for working
    on my project (such as finding that I am spending more and more time
    trying just to *find* stuff on my harddrives, and being increasingly
    hampered by a diminishing ability to drive mouses all around the
    screen :) ), I also realize from helping many of my non-computer-type
    friends that they are mostly totally bewildered about such
    distinctions as harddrives-directories-files, OS-apps, etc. Commonly,
    I get frantic calls asking for help to fix their computers, often
    with, "I was cleaning off my harddrive and now my computer doesn't
    work." Usually, this sort of problem turns out to be that they deleted
    the Windows directory, or perhaps that the Program Files directory
    seemed a wee bit too cluttered, and so on... :) The blame points
    towards poor design and quite misleading marketeering on the
    industry's part, I respectfully submit. The public thought they were
    buying a microwave but got a space shuttle... :-/

    I realized in my original epiphany perhaps seven or eight years ago,
    that something like Pathfinder was possible which would be safe and
    easy for Granny, and yet allow me to be much more productive, as well.

    > I heed you to check Microsoft's documents on "how Longhorn will be
    > great" :)


    Heh. When they announced such a few years ago, I felt a bit validated
    that my ideas were not psychotic. :) But also, I felt an urgency to
    get an open-source version out. As I said in my original post,
    however, I had no time at that time, to devote to Pathfinder while I
    was involved in another project.

    (I also note that MS has recently announced that they are dumping the
    database file system from Longhorn as they scramble in the Sysiphean
    task of "fixing Windows." :) )

    > Seriously, they're working hard to create a new paradigm
    > for the Windows desktop, and some of the things that you talk about
    > are discussed there too -- namely, they're hiding folders, drive
    > names, etc, from the user view, and creating a new and much simplified
    > user interface.


    I am somewhat familiar with MS's theoretical work. However, it is also
    my thesis, that open-source software (with a suitable BDFL -- likely
    not me, as I'm getting too old; perhaps I could be a pope or
    something... ;-) ) won't... uh... screw things up as badly as a
    profit-driven megacorp. (MS *does* have the ability to solve the
    hardware platform problem -- something OSS may have greater difficulty
    dealing with.)

    > Google is known to be working on something similar --
    > your computer will be just a big Google-indexed repository of
    > information. No more trying to file things into folders, Google will
    > categorize and locate things back for you in a snap.


    Now Google is a horse of a different color. :) Yet, with their
    incredible success, one wonders if profit-motives could possibly
    squelch innovation? And now that they're going public, they'll have to
    answer to the stockholders -- now *that* cannot be good... ;-)

    I know the founders of Google are some big branes, and that Python was
    used originally, and still is, in their shop. That's a good sign. :)

    (By the way, ideally, Pathfinder would not use trees of directories --
    "flat is better than nested." [Indeed, initial prototypes would have
    to kludge a flat structure on top of the directory trees used in
    Windows and other file systems, as Windows in particular, really bogs
    down with a dir containing ten of thousands of objects, say. And we're
    talking about hundreds of thousands of objects, at least.]
    Pathfinder's "button-panel" menu-structure *could* be a
    "simply-connected" tree, but wouldn't have to be -- the menu-structure
    could just as easily be "non-simply-connected" [presuming I have the
    nomenclature correct]. Additionally, the menu-structure would be
    easily changeable by the user: some may want the same leaf to be
    located in several or many branches, or that a leaf be found via
    several different routes. I would think that there would be some
    standard menu-structures provided, but also that the users may well
    want to change the dynamically labeled button-panel menu-structure,
    themselves, and such should be made easy to do.)

    ---

    There also is a developer in Italy with an open-source project that
    features many of Pathfinder's ideas. While his work is good, and his
    work further validated mine -- indeed, some of his writing reads
    eerily like my own copious notes on Pathfinder -- his project is not
    the complete "paradigm shift" that Pathfinder is envisioned to be,
    particularly re accessibility issues.

    > A project of this size is really big and ambitious. A suggestion is to
    > create a new mailing list and to start discussing it there. If it's in
    > Python, I'm sure you can thrown baits here at c.l.py from time to time
    > to hook new people :)


    Thanks for that suggestion!

    (Perhaps I should also hook up with the Italian developer mentioned
    above...? I've lost the link to his website, but maybe I'll find time
    to relocate it via Google.)

    But back to your excellent suggestion: My concern is that I may not be
    around along enough to even get the project launched in the envisioned
    direction. (Thus, my "dumping" of my off-topic post in here,
    yesterday.)

    But, you have *greatly* encouraged me; perhaps I *can* get a prototype
    working -- such would speak volumes louder (to mangle metaphors :) )
    than just a posting of some ideas by a newcomer to c.l.py
    (active-posting-wise; I've been lurking here and elsewhere for years).

    If I am successful in getting some reliable hardware rebuilt (I use
    laptops, preferably with touchscreens, due to physical handicaps), I
    may well be able to get a prototype of Pathfinder implemented. Python
    makes the development of even big projects so much easier than the
    myriad of languages I've used prior, that there is a slight chance
    that I could get something working, perhaps...

    (I have hesitated to mention my physical limitations even though I
    hinted at my age, and obtusely to health problems, in my email
    address, as such can often be taken for whiny complaining. :) But,
    ultimately, my physical limitations have been a blessing in disguise
    for many, many reasons. Indeed, it is the arthritis in my arms and
    hands which has been some of my main impetus for the "button-panel"
    replacement of the WIMP interface which I elaborated on more in my
    original Pathfinder posting, yesterday. And, in many other ways, I
    have found much silver within the clouds. So I am decidedly *not*
    complaining, nor even remotely bitter, nor whining, etc. about my
    limitations. I want to be absolutely clear about *this* point.
    However, accessibility issues *are* related to HCI issues, so perhaps
    it *is* appropriate that I mention my own situation at this juncture.)

    ---

    The more I think about it, the more I like your mailing-list idea.
    I'll see if I can figure out how to start one which is mirrored-by and
    postable-to the newsserver Gmane -- I like their resistance to
    disclosing private email addresses which spammers could harvest.

    ---

    I'm more of a generalist; it is slightly possible that I am not
    deluded in my thinking that my background in programming *and* art may
    well be the requisite background that folks bent on improving the HCI
    will need. My being intimately familiar with the accessibility issues
    of physically handicapped folks may also be of benefit in improving
    the HCI situation. (And, of course, laziness is a *very* good
    motivation for innovation... ;-) )

    Well, I've rambled way too long, again. :)

    I will post any notes pertaining to this project's progress, i.e.,
    becoming more concrete, even if it's just an announcement of a
    mailing-list as you suggest, here in c.l.py.

    Again, thanks very much for your comments. I shall continue to forge
    ahead as time and energy allows. At least now, some distillations of
    my notes from years of work (mostly back-burner stuff till very
    recently) is in the public record.

    And, once again, thanks very much if you or anyone has read through
    this far.

    (I'm afraid if I keep posting, I *could* turn into a "postingbot"
    rivaling some of c.l.py's best-loved and most-prolific writers. :) )


    the-grandeur-of-delusions'ly y'rs,
    Richard Hanson

    --
    sick<PERI0D>old<P0INT>fart<PIE-DEC0-SYMB0L>newsguy<MARK>com
     
    Richard Hanson, Sep 23, 2004
    #4
  5. Ksenia Marasanova wrote:

    > > My project, "code-named" Pathfinder

    >
    > Just be aware, there is also a Mac program called Pathfinder, in case
    > you wanted to keep the name...


    Thanks!

    As it happens, I had googled quite a while back and found more than
    several apps (and other things) named Pathfinder -- seems it's rather
    a popular name. So it remains merely a convenient "code-name."

    If the project gets off the ground, I *will* have to pick a name from
    my growing list of possible candidates, though.

    (I've already thought of Doors... -- doors are more useful than
    windows, aren't they? ;-) )


    names-can-be-fun'ly y'rs,
    Richard Hanson

    --
    sick<PERI0D>old<P0INT>fart<PIE-DEC0-SYMB0L>newsguy<MARK>com
     
    Richard Hanson, Sep 24, 2004
    #5
  6. Richard Hanson

    David Lees Guest

    Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance"project.

    Richard Hanson wrote:
    <snip>
    You might want to skip doors. There is already an overly complex
    requirements tool by that name:
    http://www.telelogic.com/products/doorsers/doors/index.cfm

    David
    >
    > (I've already thought of Doors... -- doors are more useful than
    > windows, aren't they? ;-) )
    >
    >
    > names-can-be-fun'ly y'rs,
    > Richard Hanson
    >
     
    David Lees, Sep 24, 2004
    #6
  7. Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance"project.

    On Thu, Sep 23, 2004 at 05:53:16PM -0700, Richard Hanson wrote:
    > Ksenia Marasanova wrote:
    >
    > > > My project, "code-named" Pathfinder

    > >
    > > Just be aware, there is also a Mac program called Pathfinder, in case
    > > you wanted to keep the name...

    >
    > As it happens, I had googled quite a while back and found more than
    > several apps (and other things) named Pathfinder -- seems it's rather
    > a popular name. So it remains merely a convenient "code-name."
    >
    > If the project gets off the ground, I *will* have to pick a name from
    > my growing list of possible candidates, though.
    >
    > (I've already thought of Doors... -- doors are more useful than
    > windows, aren't they? ;-) )


    Hmm, you could go with Daleth, the Hewbrew letter that means Door.
    A glance at the first google page shows no software with that moniker.
    As a logo it isn't terribly sexy, but you could work on it (the current
    trend seems to be dropshadow, dropshadow, dropshadow). It also sounds
    vaugely "Dr Who."

    -Jack

    ps, to any whackadoodles: no neocon conspiracy here, it just happens that
    when I was young my parents sent me to a place called "a school"
     
    Jack Diederich, Sep 24, 2004
    #7
  8. [Top-posting rearranged -- it helps me to follow the flow; I'm an old
    guy... :) ]

    David Lees wrote:

    > Richard Hanson wrote:
    >
    > > (I've already thought of Doors... -- doors are more useful than
    > > windows, aren't they? ;-) )

    >
    > You might want to skip doors. There is already an overly complex
    > requirements tool by that name:
    > http://www.telelogic.com/products/doorsers/doors/index.cfm


    Interesting. You're quite right, though; that's the opposite way I'm
    a'heading. "Simple is better than complex," and all.

    Although... uhh... I *was* typing with my tongue firmly planted in my
    cheek in my line you quoted, above. Perhaps the recent "naming
    threads" for another project should have alerted me to be more obvious
    that I was merely kidding about "Doors" -- sorry about that! (Why
    peer through murky Windows when you can walk through wide-open
    Doors?... ;-) )

    [Nota bene: There's a "winky" after that last line, immediately above,
    too. :) ]

    In any event, before this thread gets *too* out of hand with names,
    let me say explicitly that I'm concerned with getting the project
    going -- names can come later.

    Thanks very much, though!


    what-*have*-I-started'ly y'rs,
    Richard Hanson

    --
    sick<PERI0D>old<P0INT>fart<PIE-DEC0-SYMB0L>newsguy<MARK>com
     
    Richard Hanson, Sep 24, 2004
    #8
  9. Jack Diederich wrote:

    > On Thu, Sep 23, 2004 at 05:53:16PM -0700, Richard Hanson wrote:
    >
    > > Ksenia Marasanova wrote [about my project's "code-name"]:
    > >
    > > > Just be aware, there is also a Mac program called Pathfinder, in case
    > > > you wanted to keep the name...

    > >
    > > [...]
    > >
    > > (I've already thought of Doors... -- doors are more useful than
    > > windows, aren't they? ;-) )

    >
    > Hmm, you could go with Daleth, the Hewbrew letter that means Door.
    > A glance at the first google page shows no software with that moniker.
    > As a logo it isn't terribly sexy, but you could work on it (the current
    > trend seems to be dropshadow, dropshadow, dropshadow). It also sounds
    > vaugely "Dr Who."


    As I just replied to David Lees -- I didn't signal adequately that I
    was not soliciting names for the project at this juncture, but was
    merely attempting some levity. :) I *should* have realized from the
    recent "naming threads" what might happen... -- my bad! :p

    However, I *like* Daleth -- you're right, it is a bit Dr Who-ish.

    Thanks! Non-English words will be a fruitful pool to fish for names in
    -- when the time comes.


    oops!-now-I've-done-it'ly y'rs,
    Richard Hanson

    --
    sick<PERI0D>old<P0INT>fart<PIE-DEC0-SYMB0L>newsguy<MARK>com
     
    Richard Hanson, Sep 24, 2004
    #9
  10. Ksenia Marasanova <> wrote:
    ...
    > > are discussed there too -- namely, they're hiding folders, drive
    > > names, etc, from the user view, and creating a new and much simplified
    > > user interface.

    > Fortunately, Apple has been working even harder and is already there
    > with Tiger:
    > http://www.apple.com/macosx/tiger/spotlight.html
    > http://www.apple.com/macosx/tiger/search_finder.html


    Even more fortunately, Apple has learned some lessons over the last 20
    years, so its systems, while quite usable for grampa, do also appeal to
    power users and geeks -- Tiger will seamlessly let you use its wonderful
    search facilities _together_ with good organization of your materials
    (if you take the bother of the latter). Consider Mail.app: its search
    functionality works across all mailboxes or on a single mailbox --
    you're _still_ encouraged to do a little decent filing of your mails,
    though the search does make it more feasible to survive with the popular
    "one big inbox and never bother filing" paradigm;-). Consider Google:
    it doesn't eliminate the advantage of well-organized, navigable sites,
    even though it gives you a chance of surviving the typical "designed by
    marketing, what's this ``usability'' newfangled thing?!" ones...


    Alex
     
    Alex Martelli, Sep 24, 2004
    #10
  11. Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance" project.

    Jack Diederich <> wrote:
    ...
    > Hmm, you could go with Daleth, the Hewbrew letter that means Door.


    Great suggestion. While daleth.org and daleth.com are taken, daleth.net
    is free, too.


    > A glance at the first google page shows no software with that moniker.
    > As a logo it isn't terribly sexy, but you could work on it (the current


    ?! It means (inter alia) Tarot Trump III, The Empress (Venus, Earth
    Mother, Demeter -- fertility, bounty, creativity -- Daughter of the
    Mighty Ones) -- there are renderings galore, and while of course many
    are quite chaste, finding sexy ones is the least of your problems!-)


    > ps, to any whackadoodles: no neocon conspiracy here, it just happens that
    > when I was young my parents sent me to a place called "a school"


    Heh, I may be out of the current US cultural picture, I guess, but I
    wouldn't particularly connect tarot and kabbalah to neocons...


    Alex
     
    Alex Martelli, Sep 24, 2004
    #11
  12. Richard Hanson

    Mike Meyer Guest

    Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance"project.

    Carlos Ribeiro <> writes:

    > I heed you to check Microsoft's documents on "how Longhorn will be
    > great"


    Another thing to check out is <URL:
    http://sourceforge.net/projects/humane/ >, an implementation of the
    interface described in Jeff Raskin's "The Humane Interface". No
    folder, no files, simplified everything.

    <mike
    --
    Mike Meyer <> http://www.mired.org/home/mwm/
    Independent WWW/Perforce/FreeBSD/Unix consultant, email for more information.
     
    Mike Meyer, Sep 24, 2004
    #12
  13. Richard Hanson

    Peter Hansen Guest

    Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance"project.

    Richard Hanson wrote:
    > As I just replied to David Lees -- I didn't signal adequately that I
    > was not soliciting names for the project at this juncture, but was
    > merely attempting some levity. :) I *should* have realized from the
    > recent "naming threads" what might happen... -- my bad! :p


    No worries, Richard. You *did* signal that quite adequately.
    This, however, is comp.lang.python and clear signals never
    stopped anyone. <wink> You could say "Please do *not* offer
    any more name suggestions", and then sit back and peruse the
    many interesting (?) ideas that are offered anyway.

    -i'm-partial-to-FerretFace(tm)-ly y'rs,
    Peter
     
    Peter Hansen, Sep 24, 2004
    #13
  14. Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance"project.

    My opinion on this matter is that this project has
    no chance of succeeding in any palpable way. It will
    always remain at this semi-conscious level of making
    some generic statements that may make feel one better
    but have no actual relevance to the way things work.

    The Beach Boys have already properly captured
    this design in their song titled "Wouldn't It Be Nice":

    "Wouldn't it be nice if we were older
    Then we wouldn't have to wait so long
    And wouldn't it be nice to live together
    In the kind of world where we belong"

    And here is how to wake up from your dream. Pick a simple task,
    design a program that does it and make it as simple
    as you can. Then grab a few people off the street,
    take them to a room, ask them to perform the task,
    leave the room, then watch them try to accomplish
    that task. The lessons you learn in a few hours
    will last you a lifetime. You'll then understand
    why this "generic computing appliance" serving the
    "needs of a typical user" makes no sense whatsoever.

    Istvan.
     
    Istvan Albert, Sep 24, 2004
    #14
  15. Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance"project.

    On Thu, 23 Sep 2004 17:53:16 -0700, Richard Hanson <> wrote:
    > (I've already thought of Doors... -- doors are more useful than
    > windows, aren't they? ;-) )


    "Traps" are even more useful sometimes ;-)

    (...running for cover..)


    --
    Carlos Ribeiro
    Consultoria em Projetos
    blog: http://rascunhosrotos.blogspot.com
    blog: http://pythonnotes.blogspot.com
    mail:
    mail:
     
    Carlos Ribeiro, Sep 24, 2004
    #15
  16. Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance"project.

    My candidate for QOTW:

    "You *did* signal that quite adequately. This, however, is
    comp.lang.python and clear signals never stopped anyone. <wink>"




    --
    Carlos Ribeiro
    Consultoria em Projetos
    blog: http://rascunhosrotos.blogspot.com
    blog: http://pythonnotes.blogspot.com
    mail:
    mail:
     
    Carlos Ribeiro, Sep 24, 2004
    #16
  17. Richard Hanson

    Jeff Shannon Guest

    Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance"project.

    Alex Martelli wrote:

    >>ps, to any whackadoodles: no neocon conspiracy here, it just happens that
    >>when I was young my parents sent me to a place called "a school"
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Heh, I may be out of the current US cultural picture, I guess, but I
    >wouldn't particularly connect tarot and kabbalah to neocons...
    >
    >


    Ah, but there's plenty of thought about neocon ties to Israel (and the
    hard-line Zionist movement(s) there, in particular) and related
    (rumored) connections to extreme Millenial religious groups who'd be
    happy to see the arrival of Armageddon (and thus the Second Coming)...
    Mind you, I think that anyone who'd seriously connect the use of a
    Hebrew word to any of this *would* necessarily be a bit whackadoodle,
    but I've seen conspiracy theories supported by slimmer threads...

    Jeff Shannon
    Technician/Programmer
    Credit International
     
    Jeff Shannon, Sep 24, 2004
    #17
  18. Re: [OT] "Pre-announcement" of Python-based "computing appliance" project.

    [A heads up: Moderate length post; little added value by me. :) ]

    Alex Martelli wrote:

    > Jack Diederich <> wrote:
    > ...
    > > Hmm, you could go with Daleth, the Hewbrew letter that means Door.

    >
    > Great suggestion. While daleth.org and daleth.com are taken, daleth.net
    > is free, too.
    >
    > > A glance at the first google page shows no software with that moniker.
    > > As a logo it isn't terribly sexy, but you could work on it (the current

    >
    > ?! It means (inter alia) Tarot Trump III, The Empress (Venus, Earth
    > Mother, Demeter -- fertility, bounty, creativity -- Daughter of the
    > Mighty Ones) -- there are renderings galore, and while of course many
    > are quite chaste, finding sexy ones is the least of your problems!-)


    Alex's comments on the sexiness of "Daleth" noted with humor. ;-)

    Once again, I am impressed by the incredible store of general as well
    as specific knowledge available even in such a specific group as
    c.l.py. I'm a generalist, and much appreciate the opportunities to
    broaden my education through edification such as the above.

    > > ps, to any whackadoodles: no neocon conspiracy here, it just happens that
    > > when I was young my parents sent me to a place called "a school"

    >
    > Heh, I may be out of the current US cultural picture, I guess, but I
    > wouldn't particularly connect tarot and kabbalah to neocons...


    I didn't comment on Jack's PS, originally. I'm aware of the 'Merkin
    cultural picture, but studies of philosophy over the years along with
    general observations of, and introspections into, the human condition,
    have rendered me quite apolitical. I *did* get Jack's reference and
    took it in what I think was the spirit intended -- facts, not
    political agendas, given with humor.

    Thanks for the comments to both of you!


    apolitically-and-agendaless'ly y'rs,
    Richard Hanson

    --
    sick<PERI0D>old<P0INT>fart<PIE-DEC0-SYMB0L>newsguy<MARK>com
     
    Richard Hanson, Sep 24, 2004
    #18
  19. [A heads up: short post -- also, having connection problems. :-/ ]

    Mike Meyer wrote:

    > Carlos Ribeiro <> writes:
    >
    > > I heed you to check Microsoft's documents on "how Longhorn will be
    > > great"

    >
    > Another thing to check out is <URL:
    > http://sourceforge.net/projects/humane/ >, an implementation of the
    > interface described in Jeff Raskin's "The Humane Interface". No
    > folder, no files, simplified everything.


    Thanks for that link, Mike!

    I've now DL'ed the small file, and am in the process of re-DL'ing
    wxPython (computer crashes and slow connections 'R' me :) ) which
    Jeff's work appears to depend on.

    Jeff Raskin is someone I have lots of respect for. I'm quite curious
    to see what he's got going, here.

    Hmm... Perhaps, there *are* quite similar projects to the one I
    posited, already extant. Good thing I *did* post here -- there's a
    wealth of info and links to such available here in c.l.py. I may be
    able to just add input to existing projects.

    Thanks, again!


    off-to-finish-that-DL'ly y'rs,
    Richard Hanson

    --
    sick<PERI0D>old<P0INT>fart<PIE-DEC0-SYMB0L>newsguy<MARK>com
     
    Richard Hanson, Sep 24, 2004
    #19
  20. [A heads up: This is mostly a shorter, "chatty"-type post. :) ]

    Peter Hansen wrote:

    > Richard Hanson wrote:
    > > As I just replied to David Lees -- I didn't signal adequately that I
    > > was not soliciting names for the project at this juncture, but was
    > > merely attempting some levity. :) I *should* have realized from the
    > > recent "naming threads" what might happen... -- my bad! :p

    >
    > No worries, Richard. You *did* signal that quite adequately.


    Oh, good -- I was wondering if my sense of humor was tending towards
    infinitely incomprehensible. ;-)

    > This, however, is comp.lang.python and clear signals never
    > stopped anyone. <wink>


    I've noticed that. :)

    > You could say "Please do *not* offer
    > any more name suggestions", and then sit back and peruse the
    > many interesting (?) ideas that are offered anyway.


    Heh. You understand human psychology well, too, I see. :)

    By the way, I *have* appreciated all the replies -- after all, I'm a
    new poster waltzing in and plopping down with what could seem like
    some "non-tobacco"-fueled pipe dream. ;-)

    > -i'm-partial-to-FerretFace(tm)-ly y'rs,


    Now *that* is my kind of name. (I won't steal it, of course.)

    Thanks for the reply, Peter!


    onward-and-upwardly y'rs
    Richard Hanson

    --
    sick<PERI0D>old<P0INT>fart<PIE-DEC0-SYMB0L>newsguy<MARK>com
     
    Richard Hanson, Sep 24, 2004
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Alan Dechert
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    381
    Alan Dechert
    Aug 8, 2003
  2. Alex Martelli
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    411
    Alex Martelli
    Aug 18, 2003
  3. Alok, MetaStart
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    257
    Alok, MetaStart
    May 24, 2007
  4. M.-A. Lemburg

    eGenix Partner Network (Pre-Announcement)

    M.-A. Lemburg, Jul 1, 2007, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    317
    M.-A. Lemburg
    Jul 1, 2007
  5. David A. Black
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    98
    Bermejo, Rodrigo
    Dec 15, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page