(OT) Programmer's editors for the Mac

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Timothy Hunter, Feb 13, 2005.

  1. Just got a new Powerbook, so I'm looking for suggestions for a good
    programmer's editor for both Ruby and C. I already know vi. I'm looking
    for a GUI-type editor.
     
    Timothy Hunter, Feb 13, 2005
    #1
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  2. On Feb 13, 2005, at 6:02 PM, Timothy Hunter wrote:

    > Just got a new Powerbook, so I'm looking for suggestions for a good
    > programmer's editor for both Ruby and C. I already know vi. I'm
    > looking for a GUI-type editor.


    I've used BBEdit for many years now. It's a very polished very
    Mac-style editor, but the price is steep:

    http://www.barebones.com/products/bbedit/index.shtml

    Recently, I am playing with TextMate as well. The price is much
    friendlier and many of its automation features are very impressive.
    It's young, which I would say is a blessing and a curse. One the plus
    side, it's under heavy development and you can literally see the
    changes weekly. On the downside, it's still a little rough around some
    edges:

    http://macromates.com/

    I suggest trying the demos.

    Hope that helps.

    James Edward Gray II
     
    James Edward Gray II, Feb 14, 2005
    #2
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  3. TextMate...hands down the best I've used.

    http://macromates.com/

    39 euros...worth every penny.

    -rich


    On 2/13/05 7:02 PM, "Timothy Hunter" <> wrote:

    > Just got a new Powerbook, so I'm looking for suggestions for a good
    > programmer's editor for both Ruby and C. I already know vi. I'm looking
    > for a GUI-type editor.
    >
    >
    >
     
    Richard Kilmer, Feb 14, 2005
    #3
  4. On Feb 14, 2005, at 1:02 AM, Timothy Hunter wrote:
    > Just got a new Powerbook, so I'm looking for suggestions for a good
    > programmer's editor for both Ruby and C. I already know vi. I'm
    > looking for a GUI-type editor.


    as soon as i find the time i'll be porting ruvi to
    qt4 with a very pretty custom text edit widget.

    who wants to provide me with 72 hour days? ;)

    Alex
     
    Alexander Kellett, Feb 14, 2005
    #4
  5. Well, FreeIDE seems to work fine. You can get it from darwinports
    (http://darwinports.opendarwin.org).
    Just install darwinports and type "sudo port install freeride".

    As the name suggests, this solution is $39.99 cheaper than TextMate and
    works pretty well.

    -Shalev

    On Feb 13, 2005, at 7:49 PM, Alexander Kellett wrote:

    > On Feb 14, 2005, at 1:02 AM, Timothy Hunter wrote:
    >> Just got a new Powerbook, so I'm looking for suggestions for a good
    >> programmer's editor for both Ruby and C. I already know vi. I'm
    >> looking for a GUI-type editor.

    >
    > as soon as i find the time i'll be porting ruvi to
    > qt4 with a very pretty custom text edit widget.
    >
    > who wants to provide me with 72 hour days? ;)
    >
    > Alex
    >
    >
     
    Shalev NessAiver, Feb 14, 2005
    #5
  6. Timothy Hunter

    Brian Blazer Guest

    I use eclipse. With very easily installed plugins, it will work with
    just about any language you want. The GUI is very intuitive, and it
    has a lot of great functions. Plus it is FREE!!!

    Brian

    On Feb 13, 2005, at 6:02 PM, Timothy Hunter wrote:

    > Just got a new Powerbook, so I'm looking for suggestions for a good
    > programmer's editor for both Ruby and C. I already know vi. I'm
    > looking for a GUI-type editor.
    >
     
    Brian Blazer, Feb 14, 2005
    #6
  7. On pon, 2005-02-14 at 09:02 +0900, Timothy Hunter wrote:
    >Just got a new Powerbook, so I'm looking for suggestions for a good
    >programmer's editor for both Ruby and C. I already know vi. I'm looking
    >for a GUI-type editor.

    Don't forget that real programmers use Emacs. After installing some
    packages it has Ruby syntax highlighing, auto indent, can run an
    embedded Ruby interpreter, has an interface to ri and so on... Eclipse
    with Ruby plugin and FreeRIDE are some easier alternatives and can also
    be interesting.

    Jarek Rzeszótko
     
    Jarek Rzeszótko, Feb 14, 2005
    #7
  8. Timothy Hunter

    Mark Hubbart Guest

    On Mon, 14 Feb 2005 09:02:15 +0900, Timothy Hunter <> wrote:
    > Just got a new Powerbook, so I'm looking for suggestions for a good
    > programmer's editor for both Ruby and C. I already know vi. I'm looking
    > for a GUI-type editor.


    For a text editor with syntax highlighting and lightweight code
    browsing, check out SubEthaEdit
    (http://www.codingmonkeys.de/subethaedit/). Besides having a nice
    mac-ish interface, it also has some nifty collaborative features.

    And it's free (for non-commercial use, US$35 otherwise)

    cheers,
    Mark
     
    Mark Hubbart, Feb 14, 2005
    #8
  9. Timothy Hunter

    Tim Heaney Guest

    James Edward Gray II <> writes:

    > On Feb 13, 2005, at 6:02 PM, Timothy Hunter wrote:
    >
    >> Just got a new Powerbook, so I'm looking for suggestions for a good
    >> programmer's editor for both Ruby and C. I already know vi. I'm
    >> looking for a GUI-type editor.

    >
    > I've used BBEdit for many years now. It's a very polished very
    > Mac-style editor, but the price is steep:


    There is a free version, as well

    http://www.barebones.com/products/textwrangler/
     
    Tim Heaney, Feb 14, 2005
    #9
  10. --/9DWx/yDrRhgMJTb
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    * On Feb 14 9:02, Timothy Hunter () wrote:
    > I already know vi. I'm looking for a GUI-type editor.


    It has to be said. Gvim :) If you already know vi, it's the
    only way to fly.
    Tom

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    Thomas Kirchner, Feb 14, 2005
    #10
  11. Timothy Hunter wrote:
    > Just got a new Powerbook, so I'm looking for suggestions for a good
    > programmer's editor for both Ruby and C. I already know vi. I'm

    looking
    > for a GUI-type editor.


    XCode, which is part of Apple's (free) development tools, is not too
    shabby. I also like JEdit (http://jedit.org/), which is cross-platform,
    being written in Java. It's highly customizable. (Go to
    http://community.jedit.org/?q=node/view/2124 to download a Ruby syntax
    highlighting descriptor that's much more complete than the one that
    ships with the current version of JEdit.)
     
    Karl von Laudermann, Feb 14, 2005
    #11
  12. Timothy Hunter

    cyberco Guest

    Use Eclipse. It's free, it has superior code editing and there's a
    (simple) Ruby plugin. Works great for me.
     
    cyberco, Feb 14, 2005
    #12
  13. Timothy Hunter

    smoon Guest

    Just use TextMate...it costs money but it rocks! Highly extensible
    through custom commands too. Amazing tool. I use it for everything now.
    Plus I like the project view too.
     
    smoon, Feb 14, 2005
    #13
  14. On 14 Feb 2005, at 00:26, James Edward Gray II wrote:
    [snip]
    > I've used BBEdit for many years now. It's a very polished very
    > Mac-style editor, but the price is steep:
    >
    > http://www.barebones.com/products/bbedit/index.shtml

    [snip]

    The new release of TextWrangler, Bare Bones free editor, has most of
    the coding features that BBEdit has - worth a look. I "upgraded" from
    BBEdit 7 to TextWrangler and haven't missed any BBEdit features so far
    ;-)

    > Recently, I am playing with TextMate as well. The price is much
    > friendlier and many of its automation features are very impressive.
    > It's young, which I would say is a blessing and a curse. One the plus
    > side, it's under heavy development and you can literally see the
    > changes weekly. On the downside, it's still a little rough around
    > some edges:


    It is rather nice. I just played with the new beta yesterday and it's
    much improved from the first release - although it still has some odd
    corners.

    Adrian
     
    Adrian Howard, Feb 14, 2005
    #14
  15. Timothy Hunter

    Marcelo (PC) Guest

    About Ruby's IDE

    During the weekend somebody ask about IDE's... I have used Mondrian and so
    far I have found it simple and easy to use. I would really recomend it. You
    can download from:

    http://www.mondrian-ide.com

    Cheers




    --
    Este correo esta libre de virus!
     
    Marcelo (PC), Feb 14, 2005
    #15
  16. Timothy Hunter

    Trans Guest

    Thomas Kirchner wrote:
    > It has to be said. Gvim :) If you already know vi, it's the
    > only way to fly.


    I use vi/vim for quick/light editing. But I don't understand how others
    use it as their main editor. And I don't say this lightly: I even
    bought a book on using vi/vim. Yet I still often hear how "wonderous"
    it is if one does.

    So tell me this, how does one copy and paste without counting lines?
    Using n+yy & p (where n is some number) for a few lines is okay, but
    beyond that...

    Thanks
    T.
     
    Trans, Feb 14, 2005
    #16
  17. On Tue, Feb 15, 2005 at 04:10:00AM +0900, Trans wrote:
    >
    > Thomas Kirchner wrote:
    > > It has to be said. Gvim :) If you already know vi, it's the
    > > only way to fly.

    >
    > I use vi/vim for quick/light editing. But I don't understand how others
    > use it as their main editor. And I don't say this lightly: I even
    > bought a book on using vi/vim. Yet I still often hear how "wonderous"
    > it is if one does.
    >
    > So tell me this, how does one copy and paste without counting lines?
    > Using n+yy & p (where n is some number) for a few lines is okay, but
    > beyond that...


    There are other movement commands than hjkl, my favourite are %} but I
    did not investigate much of the possibilities..

    Also when I am lost I often do something like 10j 10j 4j d24k which is
    still faster than grabbing the mouse.

    Thanks

    Michal Suchanek
     
    Michal 'hramrach' Suchanek, Feb 14, 2005
    #17
  18. On Feb 14, 2005, at 8:10 PM, Trans wrote:
    > I use vi/vim for quick/light editing. But I don't understand how others
    > use it as their main editor. And I don't say this lightly: I even
    > bought a book on using vi/vim. Yet I still often hear how "wonderous"
    > it is if one does.
    >
    > So tell me this, how does one copy and paste without counting lines?
    > Using n+yy & p (where n is some number) for a few lines is okay, but
    > beyond that...


    there's no wonder u don't use vim if
    you don't know this ;)

    (v)irtual selections. j a few times. (y)ank it
    go somewhere, (p)aste it.

    tip. try editing using only \e/cw/dw/hjkl and
    characters for a day. *NEVER* use the cursor
    keys unless you're one handledly inspecting
    source.

    Alex
     
    Alexander Kellett, Feb 14, 2005
    #18
  19. On Feb 14, 2005, at 6:34 PM, smoon wrote:
    > Just use TextMate...it costs money but it rocks! Highly extensible
    > through custom commands too. Amazing tool. I use it for everything now.
    > Plus I like the project view too.


    if it had some good vim like bindings and an
    excellent plugin system i'd use it, as it stands
    other than its cute text widget it gives me nothing
    extra than vim and takes away a lot.

    also, i find its a big shame about its default syntax
    highlighting for ruby its very bland...

    Alex
     
    Alexander Kellett, Feb 14, 2005
    #19
  20. Trans wrote:
    > Thomas Kirchner wrote:
    >
    >>It has to be said. Gvim :) If you already know vi, it's the
    >>only way to fly.

    >
    >
    > I use vi/vim for quick/light editing. But I don't understand how others
    > use it as their main editor. And I don't say this lightly: I even
    > bought a book on using vi/vim. Yet I still often hear how "wonderous"
    > it is if one does.
    >
    > So tell me this, how does one copy and paste without counting lines?
    > Using n+yy & p (where n is some number) for a few lines is okay, but
    > beyond that...
    >
    > Thanks
    > T.
    >
    >


    In pure vi, I usually set a mark on the first line I like to copy, with
    mm (it remembers the position in register 'm'), go to the last line and
    do y'm. Then you can paste it wherever you want with p.

    In vim, there's a visual mode, where you can visually select text
    (selected characters are displayed in reverse video) and then choose any
    command to work on selected text, for example Vjjjy yanks 3 lines down
    the current cursor position, displaying those lines in reverse video
    along the way. Of course you can use more complex movement commands with
    visual mode. You can also choose between character selection (v), line
    selection (Shift-v) or column selection (Ctrl-v) to start visual mode.

    Gennady.

    P.S. I do use vi/vim as my main (and only) editor for everyday C++,
    Ruby, etc. development for the last 10 years. And I am totally happy
    with it ;-).
     
    Gennady Bystritksy, Feb 14, 2005
    #20
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