(OT) Stack

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by hack_tick, Aug 11, 2004.

  1. hack_tick

    hack_tick Guest

    hi
    sorry for benig so off topic here, but i felt that this is the right gruop
    for asking this question
    is there any concept like Global Stack in C ?
     
    hack_tick, Aug 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. hack_tick <> scribbled the following:
    > hi
    > sorry for benig so off topic here, but i felt that this is the right gruop
    > for asking this question
    > is there any concept like Global Stack in C ?


    No.

    --
    /-- Joona Palaste () ------------- Finland --------\
    \-- http://www.helsinki.fi/~palaste --------------------- rules! --------/
    "You can pick your friends, you can pick your nose, but you can't pick your
    relatives."
    - MAD Magazine
     
    Joona I Palaste, Aug 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. hack_tick wrote:
    > hi
    > sorry for benig so off topic here, but i felt that this is the right gruop
    > for asking this question
    > is there any concept like Global Stack in C ?
    >


    This is not off-topic really, what you'll need to do though
    is tell us what a global stack concept is. I can guess,
    but that is not very helpful.

    Is X available in standard C is almost always on topic you see.

    --
    Thomas.
     
    Thomas stegen, Aug 11, 2004
    #3
  4. hack_tick

    Malcolm Guest

    "hack_tick" <> wrote
    >
    > sorry for benig so off topic here, but i felt that this is the right gruop
    > for asking this question
    > is there any concept like Global Stack in C ?
    >

    Virtually all C compilers use a stack to store local variables. Sometimes
    function return addresses are stored on the same stack, sometimes on a
    separate stack.
    However a conforming compiler doesn't have to use a stack, if some other
    arrangement is more efficient then that's fine by the ANSI standard.
     
    Malcolm, Aug 12, 2004
    #4
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