Perl to Ruby

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Arich Chanachai, Sep 14, 2004.

  1. Also looking for a Perl to Ruby conversion utility.

    Much appreciated.

    - Arich
     
    Arich Chanachai, Sep 14, 2004
    #1
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  2. On Sep 13, 2004, at 7:49 PM, Arich Chanachai wrote:

    > Also looking for a Perl to Ruby conversion utility.


    You have a lot of questions about language cross-over. What is it you
    are looking for exactly? Perhaps we can provide better information if
    we understand what you're looking to do.

    James Edward Gray II
     
    James Edward Gray II, Sep 14, 2004
    #2
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  3. Arich Chanachai

    Guest

    On Mon, 13 Sep 2004, Arich Chanachai wrote:

    > Also looking for a Perl to Ruby conversion utility.
    >
    > Much appreciated.
    >
    > - Arich


    i work for cheap.

    ;-)

    -a
    --
    ===============================================================================
    | EMAIL :: Ara [dot] T [dot] Howard [at] noaa [dot] gov
    | PHONE :: 303.497.6469
    | A flower falls, even though we love it;
    | and a weed grows, even though we do not love it.
    | --Dogen
    ===============================================================================
     
    , Sep 14, 2004
    #3
  4. James Edward Gray II wrote:

    > On Sep 13, 2004, at 7:49 PM, Arich Chanachai wrote:
    >
    >> Also looking for a Perl to Ruby conversion utility.

    >
    >
    > You have a lot of questions about language cross-over. What is it you
    > are looking for exactly? Perhaps we can provide better information if
    > we understand what you're looking to do.
    >
    > James Edward Gray II
    >
    >
    >

    I need speed comparable to that of the .NET framework with a dynamic
    language such Ruby or Python. So far I see .NET/Mono and Java as the
    only JIT frameworks, at least worth looking at. I need to maintain the
    libraries of Python or Ruby in this cross-over however, and I do not
    know if such implementations have been created. I am aware PyCs is in
    development for .NET/Mono and Jython for Java. I am looking for a
    similar implementation of Ruby. It seems that JRuby does not compile to
    Java bytecode and Jython does not match pure Java code in speed. I have
    read that alot of Jython code is still interpreted and is thus "10x
    slower" than a Java implementation.

    Someone suggested that JRuby could be layed onto Groovy to take
    advantage of Groovy's bytecode compilation. Anyone here know anything
    about the feasibility of this or whether this would achieve the speed I
    desire? I couldn't find anywhere on the Groovy website what the speed
    comparability was between it and pure Java, but perhaps I am blind.

    Thanks all.
     
    Arich Chanachai, Sep 14, 2004
    #4
  5. James Edward Gray II wrote:

    > On Sep 13, 2004, at 7:49 PM, Arich Chanachai wrote:
    >
    >> Also looking for a Perl to Ruby conversion utility.

    >
    >
    > You have a lot of questions about language cross-over. What is it you
    > are looking for exactly? Perhaps we can provide better information if
    > we understand what you're looking to do.
    >
    > James Edward Gray II
    >
    >
    >

    Also, I have large libraries of Perl, Python, Ruby, Tcl, and C/C++ code.
    Which ever language + JIT implementation I choose, I will need to port
    these libraries. So SWIG can be used a tool for wrapping up C/C++
    libraries? If so, then perhaps all I need is to convert my modules and
    libraries into C/C++. Then I can wrap in SWIG and interface using my
    choice of language + JIT compiler.

    I remember reading somewhere on the Python site about a compiler in the
    workers, anyone know about that? Guess I'll pop over to their
    newsgroup. How about Ruby to C/C++? I may have found one in Japanese
    but who knows.

    Thanks all.
     
    Arich Chanachai, Sep 14, 2004
    #5
  6. > James Edward Gray II wrote:
    >
    >> On Sep 13, 2004, at 7:49 PM, Arich Chanachai wrote:
    >>
    >>> Also looking for a Perl to Ruby conversion utility.

    >>
    >>
    >> You have a lot of questions about language cross-over. What is it you
    >> are looking for exactly? Perhaps we can provide better information
    >> if we understand what you're looking to do.
    >>
    >> James Edward Gray II
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > I need speed comparable to that of the .NET framework with a dynamic
    > language such Ruby or Python. So far I see .NET/Mono and Java as the
    > only JIT frameworks, at least worth looking at. I need to maintain the
    > libraries of Python or Ruby in this cross-over however, and I do not
    > know if such implementations have been created. I am aware PyCs is in
    > development for .NET/Mono and Jython for Java. I am looking for a
    > similar implementation of Ruby. It seems that JRuby does not compile to
    > Java bytecode and Jython does not match pure Java code in speed. I
    > have read that alot of Jython code is still interpreted and is thus
    > "10x slower" than a Java implementation.
    >
    > Someone suggested that JRuby could be layed onto Groovy to take
    > advantage of Groovy's bytecode compilation. Anyone here know anything
    > about the feasibility of this or whether this would achieve the speed I
    > desire? I couldn't find anywhere on the Groovy website what the speed
    > comparability was between it and pure Java, but perhaps I am blind.
    >
    > Thanks all.


    Sorry I can't help with the specifics, but my general advice is this: all
    the projects you mention are immature, with the possible exception of
    JPython. So I wouldn't accept any general statements about their
    performance -- the figures would already be out of date. I don't even
    recall any discussion on this list about their performance over the last
    couple of years.

    Summary: you'll have to test them out yourself, which shouldn't be too
    hard, since Jython, JRuby, and Groovy are all demonstrated in those IBM
    articles.

    The most mature of those projects is Jython, I suspect, so that's likely
    to be your best bet, given your requirements.

    Cheers,
    Gavin
     
    Gavin Sinclair, Sep 14, 2004
    #6
  7. Arich Chanachai <> wrote:
    >
    > Someone suggested that JRuby could be layed onto Groovy to take
    > advantage of Groovy's bytecode compilation. Anyone here know anything
    > about the feasibility of this or whether this would achieve the speed I
    > desire? I couldn't find anywhere on the Groovy website what the speed
    > comparability was between it and pure Java, but perhaps I am blind.


    If you're specifically looking for something to run atop the JVM, I'd
    say Groovy was a better bet than JRuby. Also, don't miss Scala
    (http://scala.epfl.ch/index.html) which does compile to bytecode, and
    which has a .NET compiler planned too.

    martin
     
    Martin DeMello, Sep 14, 2004
    #7
  8. "Gavin Sinclair" <> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:...
    > Sorry I can't help with the specifics, but my general advice is this:

    all
    > the projects you mention are immature, with the possible exception of
    > JPython.


    Although I didn't test it completely, my impression is that Groovy is
    quite mature, too.

    > So I wouldn't accept any general statements about their
    > performance -- the figures would already be out of date. I don't even
    > recall any discussion on this list about their performance over the last
    > couple of years.


    Yes, performance for the application case at hand must be measured.
    General comparisons don't help much here.

    > Summary: you'll have to test them out yourself, which shouldn't be too
    > hard, since Jython, JRuby, and Groovy are all demonstrated in those IBM
    > articles.


    Yes!

    > The most mature of those projects is Jython, I suspect, so that's likely
    > to be your best bet, given your requirements.


    As I said, I didn't do extensive testing of Groovy and I don't know
    Jython - but Groovy seems to be quite mature (as well).

    Kind regards

    robert
     
    Robert Klemme, Sep 14, 2004
    #8
  9. Arich Chanachai ha scritto:


    > I need speed comparable to that of the .NET framework with a dynamic
    > language such Ruby or Python.


    I my opinion, the right thing to do is to go the way that usually other
    people go: write it in full ruby (or python). Then benchmark it and
    rewrite the cpu intensive code in C (or c++ or ocaml or whatever).
     
    gabriele renzi, Sep 14, 2004
    #9
  10. On Sep 13, 2004, at 10:40 PM, Arich Chanachai wrote:

    > I need speed comparable to that of the .NET framework with a dynamic
    > language such Ruby or Python.


    I agree with the poster who suggested Ruby with a little C mixed in for
    speed, but...

    You've run benchmarks I assume, by your above statement. How for
    behind .NET is Ruby for you? Perhaps we could help optimize, if it's
    not a great gap we must cross.

    What's the application?

    James Edward Gray II
     
    James Edward Gray II, Sep 14, 2004
    #10
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