plea for help: a newbie's tale

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by briansmccabe@gmail.com, Apr 14, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Hello -

    I work for a large corporation that has developed and maintained
    several dozen web sites for various clients in the insurance industry.
    My responsibilities involve the maintenance of all of these sites from
    a content standpoint - performing updates, modifying existing code,
    occasionally writing new code, etc. Almost 100% of our live sites are
    written in classic ASP. We (finally) are in the midst of a transition
    to .NET, and as such, we have a small amount of live content written in
    ..NET and several .NET projects on the table. After some hemming and
    hawing, the decision was made to utilize C# in the .NET environment.

    Here is my dilemma. I have a solid HTML background, and I have taken
    the time to educate myself in the world of PHP to a decent level
    primarily for fun. Because of my work as the content admin for these
    sites, I have a cursory understanding of classic ASP. I have an
    opportunity to really buckle down and learn a lot of stuff - and get
    paid for it - but I am struggling to find a solid starting point. We
    have VS 2005 (which I am not experienced at using), the .NET Framework
    (which frankly I have very little understanding of what that even is)
    and now the decision has been made to program upcoming "web app"
    projects in C#.....

    Is there an online resource that explains to an absolute beginner what
    the .NET framwork *is*? I guess what I am driving at is that in
    learning PHP, I found that it was lacking sophistication - in a *good*
    way. I have a free text editor, I connect to a web server via FTP, I
    code, it throws errors, I debug, it works, end of story. The sheer
    vastness of Visual Studio, the .NET framework, all of these things that
    need to be in place, etc etc etc - it's overwhelming. I am very
    interested in viewing an online resource that sort of walks through the
    ins and outs of a MS-based developer's world.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks so much -

    Brian Mc
    , Apr 14, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Where to start ?

    OK, First of all you probably dont need to worry too much about the
    framework other than to understand that it comprises of thousands of classes
    grouped into something called namespaces. to use these classes you can write
    a using statement at the top of your code or explicitly access the class
    with its full address

    ie
    namespace.namespace.namepace.classname

    In order to get going on VS2005 Web designer, you need to know some basics
    about the language of choice, basic syntax. Having said that you would
    probably be able to do a considerable amount with only a relatively small
    understanding of the language.

    Where your first major challenge is going to be is understanding the basic
    building blocks which comprise an ASP.NET application and how this relates
    to the rendered HTML/IIS/Security etc etc. One other tip would be to get a
    very firm grip on the order that page events fire in as this will be crucial
    to reducing the amount of time you waste trying to understand why your
    application is not working.

    My advice would be to book yourself onto a 3-5 day course to get a
    kickstart and then do some serious reading before, after and during this
    point in your learning curve while spending a huge amount of time trying to
    make applications for real world applications rather than play with it.

    Additionally, you would benefit from trying to help others on the newsgroups
    as it drags you to areas you might not normally venture in to.


    HTH

    --
    ( OHM ) - One Handed Man
    AKA Terry Burns - http://TrainingOn.net



    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello -
    >
    > I work for a large corporation that has developed and maintained
    > several dozen web sites for various clients in the insurance industry.
    > My responsibilities involve the maintenance of all of these sites from
    > a content standpoint - performing updates, modifying existing code,
    > occasionally writing new code, etc. Almost 100% of our live sites are
    > written in classic ASP. We (finally) are in the midst of a transition
    > to .NET, and as such, we have a small amount of live content written in
    > .NET and several .NET projects on the table. After some hemming and
    > hawing, the decision was made to utilize C# in the .NET environment.
    >
    > Here is my dilemma. I have a solid HTML background, and I have taken
    > the time to educate myself in the world of PHP to a decent level
    > primarily for fun. Because of my work as the content admin for these
    > sites, I have a cursory understanding of classic ASP. I have an
    > opportunity to really buckle down and learn a lot of stuff - and get
    > paid for it - but I am struggling to find a solid starting point. We
    > have VS 2005 (which I am not experienced at using), the .NET Framework
    > (which frankly I have very little understanding of what that even is)
    > and now the decision has been made to program upcoming "web app"
    > projects in C#.....
    >
    > Is there an online resource that explains to an absolute beginner what
    > the .NET framwork *is*? I guess what I am driving at is that in
    > learning PHP, I found that it was lacking sophistication - in a *good*
    > way. I have a free text editor, I connect to a web server via FTP, I
    > code, it throws errors, I debug, it works, end of story. The sheer
    > vastness of Visual Studio, the .NET framework, all of these things that
    > need to be in place, etc etc etc - it's overwhelming. I am very
    > interested in viewing an online resource that sort of walks through the
    > ins and outs of a MS-based developer's world.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    > Thanks so much -
    >
    > Brian Mc
    >
    OHM \( One Handed Man \), Apr 14, 2006
    #2
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  3. Trevor Braun Guest

    I'm not sure that I can offer a good starting point, other than to pick up a
    book. Personally, I find the Apress/Wrox books the best bunch of books to
    read without being bored to tears.

    I hired a programmer to do some work for me recently and he had pretty much
    the same background as you. He was very overwhelmed at the start, but
    quickly saw how much the power of ASP.NET simplified life overall.
    Unfortunately, there is simply no substitute for experience because the
    transition from tradional "web design" to "web application" is huge. I
    would never recommend that a company doing webites should switch to .NET
    unless their websites are growing into more web application development.
    And if that is the case with your company, then you will find the transition
    to make a lot of sense, and while painful by times will simplify things over
    the longer term.

    To describe the .NET Framework in a single statement would be an immense
    unjustice to the team that developed it, but I'll say this: picture it as a
    massive library of cohesive functions that are designed to simplify your
    programming life in every way imaginable.

    I generally write Windows apps, but have recently been forced into some web
    development. In doing so, I've seen how similar the two development types
    have become. If your company is moving to .NET development, let me
    recommend this: learn C# but don't stop there, you must read some books on
    developing n-tier applications. One of the best, most flexible frameworks
    you're likely to find are Rockford Lhotka's Business Objects (the framework
    has many years of support behind it, and has just had a face lift for .NET
    2.0, and is free/open source). There are two versions of his book which
    describe the framework, and he is an excellent writer. The two books are
    for C# and VB.NET; the only difference in the two are the language of the
    example code.

    If you learn just C# and put that to use you'll have gained very little on
    the switch from classic ASP to ASP.NET. If you learn how to build and use
    the various layers of the n-tier model, you'll gain the "ability" to build
    some very impressive web applications.

    I am an absolute .NET fanatic. When I used .NET 1.0/1.1, I really couldn't
    see how Microsoft would simplify my life in the switch to 2.0; I was
    absolutely blown away when I made the switch to .NET 2 and VS2005. Your
    company has (IMO) made a very wise choice in making the switch to .NET
    development. You'll open many more doors as many of your customers will
    want to see better and better use of CRM and other "web-enablements" on
    their websites.

    For online resources there are a ton of them. The ones I use are:
    msdn.microsoft.com - mostly for reference material, but there is a ton of
    articles, how-to's and tutorials
    www.codeproject.com - it is rare that there isn't an article here telling
    you how to accomplish exactly what you're trying to accomplish!!
    www.gotdotnet.com - excellent information and forums that are reviewed by
    Microsoft staff and some of the best technical experts out there

    I hope this helps you out. Enjoy .NET!!

    Trevor B




    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello -
    >
    > I work for a large corporation that has developed and maintained
    > several dozen web sites for various clients in the insurance industry.
    > My responsibilities involve the maintenance of all of these sites from
    > a content standpoint - performing updates, modifying existing code,
    > occasionally writing new code, etc. Almost 100% of our live sites are
    > written in classic ASP. We (finally) are in the midst of a transition
    > to .NET, and as such, we have a small amount of live content written in
    > .NET and several .NET projects on the table. After some hemming and
    > hawing, the decision was made to utilize C# in the .NET environment.
    >
    > Here is my dilemma. I have a solid HTML background, and I have taken
    > the time to educate myself in the world of PHP to a decent level
    > primarily for fun. Because of my work as the content admin for these
    > sites, I have a cursory understanding of classic ASP. I have an
    > opportunity to really buckle down and learn a lot of stuff - and get
    > paid for it - but I am struggling to find a solid starting point. We
    > have VS 2005 (which I am not experienced at using), the .NET Framework
    > (which frankly I have very little understanding of what that even is)
    > and now the decision has been made to program upcoming "web app"
    > projects in C#.....
    >
    > Is there an online resource that explains to an absolute beginner what
    > the .NET framwork *is*? I guess what I am driving at is that in
    > learning PHP, I found that it was lacking sophistication - in a *good*
    > way. I have a free text editor, I connect to a web server via FTP, I
    > code, it throws errors, I debug, it works, end of story. The sheer
    > vastness of Visual Studio, the .NET framework, all of these things that
    > need to be in place, etc etc etc - it's overwhelming. I am very
    > interested in viewing an online resource that sort of walks through the
    > ins and outs of a MS-based developer's world.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    > Thanks so much -
    >
    > Brian Mc
    >
    Trevor Braun, Apr 14, 2006
    #3
  4. Guest

    Thank you so much. I appreciate your feedback. I am actually attending
    a weeklong course toward the end of May, so I will try and bone up
    before then.

    Thanks again!
    , Apr 14, 2006
    #4
  5. Brian,
    Surprisingly nobody mentioned the asp.net Quickstarts. They install with
    both Visyal Studio.NET and the .NET Framework SDK, and online versions are
    also available.

    Best place to start.
    Peter

    --
    Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    UnBlog:
    http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com




    "" wrote:

    > Hello -
    >
    > I work for a large corporation that has developed and maintained
    > several dozen web sites for various clients in the insurance industry.
    > My responsibilities involve the maintenance of all of these sites from
    > a content standpoint - performing updates, modifying existing code,
    > occasionally writing new code, etc. Almost 100% of our live sites are
    > written in classic ASP. We (finally) are in the midst of a transition
    > to .NET, and as such, we have a small amount of live content written in
    > ..NET and several .NET projects on the table. After some hemming and
    > hawing, the decision was made to utilize C# in the .NET environment.
    >
    > Here is my dilemma. I have a solid HTML background, and I have taken
    > the time to educate myself in the world of PHP to a decent level
    > primarily for fun. Because of my work as the content admin for these
    > sites, I have a cursory understanding of classic ASP. I have an
    > opportunity to really buckle down and learn a lot of stuff - and get
    > paid for it - but I am struggling to find a solid starting point. We
    > have VS 2005 (which I am not experienced at using), the .NET Framework
    > (which frankly I have very little understanding of what that even is)
    > and now the decision has been made to program upcoming "web app"
    > projects in C#.....
    >
    > Is there an online resource that explains to an absolute beginner what
    > the .NET framwork *is*? I guess what I am driving at is that in
    > learning PHP, I found that it was lacking sophistication - in a *good*
    > way. I have a free text editor, I connect to a web server via FTP, I
    > code, it throws errors, I debug, it works, end of story. The sheer
    > vastness of Visual Studio, the .NET framework, all of these things that
    > need to be in place, etc etc etc - it's overwhelming. I am very
    > interested in viewing an online resource that sort of walks through the
    > ins and outs of a MS-based developer's world.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    > Thanks so much -
    >
    > Brian Mc
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?UGV0ZXIgQnJvbWJlcmcgW0MjIE1WUF0=?=, Apr 14, 2006
    #5
  6. Guest

    QuickStarts - these are tutorials of some sort?

    Also I am curious if the free version of VS (I think it's called
    Express) allows access to the framework. I actually was fortunate
    enough to attend MIX '06 in Vegas last month so I have a complimentary
    VS Standard license but I have more than one machine, so I thought
    perhaps I would run the express on one. Is the framework itself free?
    What is the difference between the MSDN Library and the Framework?
    , Apr 14, 2006
    #6
  7. nakedCode Guest

    The MSDN Library is a source of information, documentation and loads of other
    bells, whistles and trumbones.

    The .Net Framewwork its self and indeed an sdk with a command line compiler
    are free

    If its webapps you plan to do, why not start reading here http://www.asp.net

    > QuickStarts - these are tutorials of some sort?
    >
    > Also I am curious if the free version of VS (I think it's called
    > Express) allows access to the framework. I actually was fortunate
    > enough to attend MIX '06 in Vegas last month so I have a complimentary
    > VS Standard license but I have more than one machine, so I thought
    > perhaps I would run the express on one. Is the framework itself free?
    > What is the difference between the MSDN Library and the Framework?
    >
    nakedCode, Apr 14, 2006
    #7
  8. Brian,

    Your situation is not that great, and this is why:

    ASP.NET is a fairly complex topic; much more sophisticated than
    classic ASP. Even an experienced developer gets challenged and
    overwhelmed by it, especially if he/she wants to do things the right
    way.

    What usually happens is that companies decide to move to ASP.NET
    without having a slightest experience with the obvious prerequisite:
    ..NET and C# in general. As the result, the developers struggle right
    from the start, because they never get the above prerequisite under
    their belt. A persistent person would eventually succeed, of course,
    but he would face a very difficult route. In majority of cases,
    however, you'd get a half-breed "ASP.NET developers" who hack
    bad-to-mediocre solutions and still get puzzled by trivial
    ..NET-related problems. This is very sad and annoying reality, I must
    admit.

    A much better way is to start with generic .NET programming and C# and
    not move to ASP.NET at all, until you get really proficient and
    understand the concept of .NET clearly. Unfortunately, not everyone
    has a choice to go this way due to immediate business needs.



    On 14 Apr 2006 09:18:11 -0700, wrote:

    >Hello -
    >
    > I work for a large corporation that has developed and maintained
    >several dozen web sites for various clients in the insurance industry.
    >My responsibilities involve the maintenance of all of these sites from
    >a content standpoint - performing updates, modifying existing code,
    >occasionally writing new code, etc. Almost 100% of our live sites are
    >written in classic ASP. We (finally) are in the midst of a transition
    >to .NET, and as such, we have a small amount of live content written in
    >.NET and several .NET projects on the table. After some hemming and
    >hawing, the decision was made to utilize C# in the .NET environment.
    >
    > Here is my dilemma. I have a solid HTML background, and I have taken
    >the time to educate myself in the world of PHP to a decent level
    >primarily for fun. Because of my work as the content admin for these
    >sites, I have a cursory understanding of classic ASP. I have an
    >opportunity to really buckle down and learn a lot of stuff - and get
    >paid for it - but I am struggling to find a solid starting point. We
    >have VS 2005 (which I am not experienced at using), the .NET Framework
    >(which frankly I have very little understanding of what that even is)
    >and now the decision has been made to program upcoming "web app"
    >projects in C#.....
    >
    >Is there an online resource that explains to an absolute beginner what
    >the .NET framwork *is*? I guess what I am driving at is that in
    >learning PHP, I found that it was lacking sophistication - in a *good*
    >way. I have a free text editor, I connect to a web server via FTP, I
    >code, it throws errors, I debug, it works, end of story. The sheer
    >vastness of Visual Studio, the .NET framework, all of these things that
    >need to be in place, etc etc etc - it's overwhelming. I am very
    >interested in viewing an online resource that sort of walks through the
    >ins and outs of a MS-based developer's world.
    >
    >Any ideas?
    >
    >Thanks so much -
    >
    >Brian Mc
    Usenet User, Apr 15, 2006
    #8
  9. Some of the very first programs I wrote with the .NET Beta 1.0 Framwork CDs
    from Tech-Ed Orlando in 2000 were web applications. I was a VB programmer and
    C# was alien to me. But I was so motivated by what you could do with it that
    I was hooked, and my skills got better and better, partly thanks to
    constructive comments from gurus on these very forums.
    Peter

    --
    Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    UnBlog:
    http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com




    "Usenet User" wrote:

    > Brian,
    >
    > Your situation is not that great, and this is why:
    >
    > ASP.NET is a fairly complex topic; much more sophisticated than
    > classic ASP. Even an experienced developer gets challenged and
    > overwhelmed by it, especially if he/she wants to do things the right
    > way.
    >
    > What usually happens is that companies decide to move to ASP.NET
    > without having a slightest experience with the obvious prerequisite:
    > ..NET and C# in general. As the result, the developers struggle right
    > from the start, because they never get the above prerequisite under
    > their belt. A persistent person would eventually succeed, of course,
    > but he would face a very difficult route. In majority of cases,
    > however, you'd get a half-breed "ASP.NET developers" who hack
    > bad-to-mediocre solutions and still get puzzled by trivial
    > ..NET-related problems. This is very sad and annoying reality, I must
    > admit.
    >
    > A much better way is to start with generic .NET programming and C# and
    > not move to ASP.NET at all, until you get really proficient and
    > understand the concept of .NET clearly. Unfortunately, not everyone
    > has a choice to go this way due to immediate business needs.
    >
    >
    >
    > On 14 Apr 2006 09:18:11 -0700, wrote:
    >
    > >Hello -
    > >
    > > I work for a large corporation that has developed and maintained
    > >several dozen web sites for various clients in the insurance industry.
    > >My responsibilities involve the maintenance of all of these sites from
    > >a content standpoint - performing updates, modifying existing code,
    > >occasionally writing new code, etc. Almost 100% of our live sites are
    > >written in classic ASP. We (finally) are in the midst of a transition
    > >to .NET, and as such, we have a small amount of live content written in
    > >.NET and several .NET projects on the table. After some hemming and
    > >hawing, the decision was made to utilize C# in the .NET environment.
    > >
    > > Here is my dilemma. I have a solid HTML background, and I have taken
    > >the time to educate myself in the world of PHP to a decent level
    > >primarily for fun. Because of my work as the content admin for these
    > >sites, I have a cursory understanding of classic ASP. I have an
    > >opportunity to really buckle down and learn a lot of stuff - and get
    > >paid for it - but I am struggling to find a solid starting point. We
    > >have VS 2005 (which I am not experienced at using), the .NET Framework
    > >(which frankly I have very little understanding of what that even is)
    > >and now the decision has been made to program upcoming "web app"
    > >projects in C#.....
    > >
    > >Is there an online resource that explains to an absolute beginner what
    > >the .NET framwork *is*? I guess what I am driving at is that in
    > >learning PHP, I found that it was lacking sophistication - in a *good*
    > >way. I have a free text editor, I connect to a web server via FTP, I
    > >code, it throws errors, I debug, it works, end of story. The sheer
    > >vastness of Visual Studio, the .NET framework, all of these things that
    > >need to be in place, etc etc etc - it's overwhelming. I am very
    > >interested in viewing an online resource that sort of walks through the
    > >ins and outs of a MS-based developer's world.
    > >
    > >Any ideas?
    > >
    > >Thanks so much -
    > >
    > >Brian Mc

    >
    =?Utf-8?B?UGV0ZXIgQnJvbWJlcmcgW0MjIE1WUF0=?=, Apr 15, 2006
    #9
  10. Well said !

    --
    ( OHM ) - One Handed Man
    AKA Terry Burns - http://TrainingOn.net

    "Peter Bromberg [C# MVP]" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Some of the very first programs I wrote with the .NET Beta 1.0 Framwork
    > CDs
    > from Tech-Ed Orlando in 2000 were web applications. I was a VB programmer
    > and
    > C# was alien to me. But I was so motivated by what you could do with it
    > that
    > I was hooked, and my skills got better and better, partly thanks to
    > constructive comments from gurus on these very forums.
    > Peter
    >
    > --
    > Co-founder, Eggheadcafe.com developer portal:
    > http://www.eggheadcafe.com
    > UnBlog:
    > http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Usenet User" wrote:
    >
    >> Brian,
    >>
    >> Your situation is not that great, and this is why:
    >>
    >> ASP.NET is a fairly complex topic; much more sophisticated than
    >> classic ASP. Even an experienced developer gets challenged and
    >> overwhelmed by it, especially if he/she wants to do things the right
    >> way.
    >>
    >> What usually happens is that companies decide to move to ASP.NET
    >> without having a slightest experience with the obvious prerequisite:
    >> ..NET and C# in general. As the result, the developers struggle right
    >> from the start, because they never get the above prerequisite under
    >> their belt. A persistent person would eventually succeed, of course,
    >> but he would face a very difficult route. In majority of cases,
    >> however, you'd get a half-breed "ASP.NET developers" who hack
    >> bad-to-mediocre solutions and still get puzzled by trivial
    >> ..NET-related problems. This is very sad and annoying reality, I must
    >> admit.
    >>
    >> A much better way is to start with generic .NET programming and C# and
    >> not move to ASP.NET at all, until you get really proficient and
    >> understand the concept of .NET clearly. Unfortunately, not everyone
    >> has a choice to go this way due to immediate business needs.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> On 14 Apr 2006 09:18:11 -0700, wrote:
    >>
    >> >Hello -
    >> >
    >> > I work for a large corporation that has developed and maintained
    >> >several dozen web sites for various clients in the insurance industry.
    >> >My responsibilities involve the maintenance of all of these sites from
    >> >a content standpoint - performing updates, modifying existing code,
    >> >occasionally writing new code, etc. Almost 100% of our live sites are
    >> >written in classic ASP. We (finally) are in the midst of a transition
    >> >to .NET, and as such, we have a small amount of live content written in
    >> >.NET and several .NET projects on the table. After some hemming and
    >> >hawing, the decision was made to utilize C# in the .NET environment.
    >> >
    >> > Here is my dilemma. I have a solid HTML background, and I have taken
    >> >the time to educate myself in the world of PHP to a decent level
    >> >primarily for fun. Because of my work as the content admin for these
    >> >sites, I have a cursory understanding of classic ASP. I have an
    >> >opportunity to really buckle down and learn a lot of stuff - and get
    >> >paid for it - but I am struggling to find a solid starting point. We
    >> >have VS 2005 (which I am not experienced at using), the .NET Framework
    >> >(which frankly I have very little understanding of what that even is)
    >> >and now the decision has been made to program upcoming "web app"
    >> >projects in C#.....
    >> >
    >> >Is there an online resource that explains to an absolute beginner what
    >> >the .NET framwork *is*? I guess what I am driving at is that in
    >> >learning PHP, I found that it was lacking sophistication - in a *good*
    >> >way. I have a free text editor, I connect to a web server via FTP, I
    >> >code, it throws errors, I debug, it works, end of story. The sheer
    >> >vastness of Visual Studio, the .NET framework, all of these things that
    >> >need to be in place, etc etc etc - it's overwhelming. I am very
    >> >interested in viewing an online resource that sort of walks through the
    >> >ins and outs of a MS-based developer's world.
    >> >
    >> >Any ideas?
    >> >
    >> >Thanks so much -
    >> >
    >> >Brian Mc

    >>
    OHM \( One Handed Man \), Apr 15, 2006
    #10
  11. On 14 Apr 2006 09:18:11 -0700, wrote:

    >Hello -
    >
    > I work for a large corporation that has developed and maintained
    >several dozen web sites for various clients in the insurance industry.
    >My responsibilities involve the maintenance of all of these sites from
    >a content standpoint - performing updates, modifying existing code,
    >occasionally writing new code, etc. Almost 100% of our live sites are
    >written in classic ASP. We (finally) are in the midst of a transition
    >to .NET, and as such, we have a small amount of live content written in
    >.NET and several .NET projects on the table. After some hemming and
    >hawing, the decision was made to utilize C# in the .NET environment.
    >
    > Here is my dilemma. I have a solid HTML background, and I have taken
    >the time to educate myself in the world of PHP to a decent level
    >primarily for fun. Because of my work as the content admin for these
    >sites, I have a cursory understanding of classic ASP. I have an
    >opportunity to really buckle down and learn a lot of stuff - and get
    >paid for it - but I am struggling to find a solid starting point. We
    >have VS 2005 (which I am not experienced at using), the .NET Framework
    >(which frankly I have very little understanding of what that even is)
    >and now the decision has been made to program upcoming "web app"
    >projects in C#.....
    >
    >Is there an online resource that explains to an absolute beginner what
    >the .NET framwork *is*? I guess what I am driving at is that in
    >learning PHP, I found that it was lacking sophistication - in a *good*
    >way. I have a free text editor, I connect to a web server via FTP, I
    >code, it throws errors, I debug, it works, end of story. The sheer
    >vastness of Visual Studio, the .NET framework, all of these things that
    >need to be in place, etc etc etc - it's overwhelming. I am very
    >interested in viewing an online resource that sort of walks through the
    >ins and outs of a MS-based developer's world.
    >
    >Any ideas?
    >
    >Thanks so much -
    >
    >Brian Mc


    One way to learn would be to purchase one of the Express editions of .NET and
    get your feet wet at home. I believe the Express versions were created with
    beginning programmers in mind. You can read about them at the URL below.

    http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2004/jun04/06-29expressdebutpr.mspx

    Good luck with your project,

    Otis Mukinfus
    http://www.arltex.com
    http://www.tomchilders.com
    Otis Mukinfus, Apr 15, 2006
    #11
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