Popular Python projects with lots of pure Python code

Discussion in 'Python' started by Brett C., Aug 9, 2004.

  1. Brett C.

    Brett C. Guest

    For my thesis (once the bloody thing stops throwing bugs at me) I am
    going to need to collect stats on the frequency that atomic types in
    local variables are applied to various opcodes and methods. That means
    that I need something to collect stats off of.

    So I am trying to come up with a list of projects I can use to get my
    stats from. the stdlib is a no-brainer. Also plan to use Docutils.
    But beyond those most of the big Python projects I can think of have a
    ton of C code which is of no use to me. I don't need to be able to run
    it, just going to be compiling to .py files.

    Any suggestions?

    -Brett
    Brett C., Aug 9, 2004
    #1
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  2. Brett C.

    Roger Binns Guest

    Brett C. wrote:
    > So I am trying to come up with a list of projects I can use to get my
    > stats from. the stdlib is a no-brainer. Also plan to use Docutils.
    > But beyond those most of the big Python projects I can think of have a
    > ton of C code which is of no use to me. I don't need to be able to
    > run it, just going to be compiling to .py files.


    ZOPE/Plone. BitTorrent.

    Have a look on SourceForge.

    http://sourceforge.net/softwaremap/trove_list.php?form_cat=178

    Other than the 10,000 clones of BitTorrent and projects that
    use Python very peripherally, there are many appropriate
    projects.

    My BitPim project has 30,000 lines of Python, 2,500 lines of
    description files which are compiled into 41,000 lines of
    Python and 500 lines of C/C++. It does GUI stuff, talks on
    serial ports to cell phones, has XML-RPC remoting over secure
    connections, has installation code, uses external data sources
    such as CSV, vCards as well as Outlook, Evolution etc. Consequently
    that gives you a nice wide spread of things the code does. If you do
    use it, feel free to send me email if you have any questions
    or need help. There is also a presentation I did which gives a
    good overview:

    http://bitpim.org/papers/baypiggies/

    Roger
    Roger Binns, Aug 9, 2004
    #2
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  3. Brett C.

    Larry Bates Guest

    ReportLab?

    HTH,
    Larry Bates
    Syscon, Inc.

    "Brett C." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > For my thesis (once the bloody thing stops throwing bugs at me) I am
    > going to need to collect stats on the frequency that atomic types in
    > local variables are applied to various opcodes and methods. That means
    > that I need something to collect stats off of.
    >
    > So I am trying to come up with a list of projects I can use to get my
    > stats from. the stdlib is a no-brainer. Also plan to use Docutils.
    > But beyond those most of the big Python projects I can think of have a
    > ton of C code which is of no use to me. I don't need to be able to run
    > it, just going to be compiling to .py files.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > -Brett
    Larry Bates, Aug 9, 2004
    #3
  4. In article <>, Brett C. wrote:
    > For my thesis (once the bloody thing stops throwing bugs at me) I am
    > going to need to collect stats on the frequency that atomic types in
    > local variables are applied to various opcodes and methods. That means
    > that I need something to collect stats off of.
    >
    > So I am trying to come up with a list of projects I can use to get my
    > stats from. the stdlib is a no-brainer. Also plan to use Docutils.
    > But beyond those most of the big Python projects I can think of have a
    > ton of C code which is of no use to me. I don't need to be able to run
    > it, just going to be compiling to .py files.
    >
    > Any suggestions?


    What about MoinMoin and Mailman? Those are fairly large-ish pure-python
    projects.

    If 100% pure python isn't a must, PIL might also be able to yield useful stats
    as all of the abstraction is done in python.

    Hope this helps,

    Troels Therkelsen
    Troels Therkelsen, Aug 9, 2004
    #4
  5. Brett C.

    Roy Smith Guest

    In article <>,
    "Brett C." <> wrote:

    > For my thesis (once the bloody thing stops throwing bugs at me) I am
    > going to need to collect stats on the frequency that atomic types in
    > local variables are applied to various opcodes and methods. That means
    > that I need something to collect stats off of.
    >
    > So I am trying to come up with a list of projects I can use to get my
    > stats from. the stdlib is a no-brainer. Also plan to use Docutils.
    > But beyond those most of the big Python projects I can think of have a
    > ton of C code which is of no use to me. I don't need to be able to run
    > it, just going to be compiling to .py files.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > -Brett


    Ilya Etingof's PySNMP package is a pretty large collection of Python
    code. See http://pysnmp.sourceforge.net/
    Roy Smith, Aug 10, 2004
    #5
  6. Brett C. wrote:

    > For my thesis (once the bloody thing stops throwing bugs at me) I am
    > going to need to collect stats on the frequency that atomic types in
    > local variables are applied to various opcodes and methods. That means
    > that I need something to collect stats off of.
    >
    > So I am trying to come up with a list of projects I can use to get my
    > stats from. the stdlib is a no-brainer. Also plan to use Docutils.
    > But beyond those most of the big Python projects I can think of have a
    > ton of C code which is of no use to me. I don't need to be able to run
    > it, just going to be compiling to .py files.
    >
    > Any suggestions?


    well, scipy is not pure python (lots of fortran/C), but it does have a lot of
    python in it. Given that it's probably a decent representative of typical
    scientific code (and scientific use of python is growing fast, see scipy'04),
    it might be an interesting addition to your sample.

    Best,

    f
    Fernando Perez, Aug 10, 2004
    #6
  7. Brett C. wrote:
    > For my thesis (once the bloody thing stops throwing bugs at me) I am
    > going to need to collect stats on the frequency that atomic types in
    > local variables are applied to various opcodes and methods. That
    > means that I need something to collect stats off of.
    >
    > So I am trying to come up with a list of projects I can use to get my
    > stats from. the stdlib is a no-brainer. Also plan to use Docutils.
    > But beyond those most of the big Python projects I can think of have a
    > ton of C code which is of no use to me. I don't need to be able to
    > run it, just going to be compiling to .py files.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > -Brett


    BoaConstructor
    Patrick Ellis, Aug 10, 2004
    #7
  8. Brett C.

    Dan Sommers Guest

    On Mon, 09 Aug 2004 15:01:29 -0700,
    "Brett C." <> wrote:

    > For my thesis (once the bloody thing stops throwing bugs at me) I am
    > going to need to collect stats on the frequency that atomic types in
    > local variables are applied to various opcodes and methods. That means
    > that I need something to collect stats off of.


    > So I am trying to come up with a list of projects I can use to get my
    > stats from. the stdlib is a no-brainer. Also plan to use Docutils. But
    > beyond those most of the big Python projects I can think of have a ton
    > of C code which is of no use to me. I don't need to be able to run it,
    > just going to be compiling to .py files.


    > Any suggestions?


    It's not a project, as such, but how about Python's standard library?

    Tons and tons of python code, written by the best python coders around.

    Regards,
    Dan

    --
    Dan Sommers
    <http://www.tombstonezero.net/dan/>
    Never play leapfrog with a unicorn.
    Dan Sommers, Aug 10, 2004
    #8
  9. Troels Therkelsen <> wrote in message news:<slrnchfvom.t6.t_therkelsen@abattoir.2-10.org>...
    > In article <>, Brett C. wrote:
    > >[/snipped]
    > >
    > > Any suggestions?

    yeah, why don't you go to sourcforge and search under python projects,
    you'll get a ton
    Michael Scarlett, Aug 10, 2004
    #9
  10. Brett C. wrote:

    > For my thesis (once the bloody thing stops throwing bugs at me) I am
    > going to need to collect stats on the frequency that atomic types in
    > local variables are applied to various opcodes and methods. That means
    > that I need something to collect stats off of.
    >
    > So I am trying to come up with a list of projects I can use to get my
    > stats from. the stdlib is a no-brainer. Also plan to use Docutils.
    > But beyond those most of the big Python projects I can think of have a
    > ton of C code which is of no use to me. I don't need to be able to run
    > it, just going to be compiling to .py files.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > -Brett


    How about eric3 (http://www.die-offenbachs.de/detlev/eric3.html). It has
    about 50 klines of code.

    Detlev
    --
    Detlev Offenbach
    Detlev Offenbach, Aug 10, 2004
    #10
  11. Brett C.

    Brett C. Guest

    "Brett C." <> wrote in message news:
    > Any suggestions?
    >


    Just a quick thanks to everyone who has responded. I truly
    appreciate the help on this! This is why the Python community is just
    so damn cool!

    And here are some quick answers to some questions that have come up in
    the thread...

    "Big" is relative; not looking for simple scripts, but otherwise I am
    open. No real minimum size or anything.

    The projects do not have to be devoid of C; just have enough Python
    code to warrant using.

    "Popular" is also relative. Since Python is not used here at my
    school (Cal Poly SLO), I wanted to also use my thesis as a slight PR
    piece within the department. Being able to list big, popular Python
    projects would help to show the legitimacy of the language to
    professors.

    Please suggest only open source projects. While I have no issue with
    proprietary projects personally I don't want to have to worry about
    what I can and cannot discuss in my thesis.

    I personally don't need any more web projects listed. Go for it if
    this thread just keeps going, but with the ones listed so far that is
    plenty. I would love to get a wide swath of projects so as to make
    sure my thesis can't be accused of not being representative of non-web
    projects.

    Something I should have mentioned in the OP is anything that has a
    benchmark is an uber-plus! I am going to end up having to benchmark
    some code that I did not gather stats on along with some that I did to
    try to show that this was all worth it. Already plan to use pystone
    and parrotbench.

    Anyway, here is the current list that I have going. Ignore the
    question marks; just means I have not decided whether I am definitely
    using it or not.

    ----------------

    -----------------------------------
    Projects for stat collection
    -----------------------------------
    + Stdlib (w/o test)
    + Docutils
    + Twisted?
    + Zope?
    * Plone?
    + ReportLab?
    + wxPython?
    + BitTorrent?
    + SpamBayes?
    + Mailman?
    + SiGeFi ?
    + Plucker ?
    + Universal Feed Parser ?
    + Shtoom?
    + Divmod Quotient?
    + MoinMoin?
    + PIL?
    + PySNMP ?
    + scipy ?
    + Boa Constructor ?
    + PythonCard ?
    + OpenGLContext ?
    + PyTable ?

    ------------------
    Benchmarks
    ------------------
    + pystone
    + parrotbench
    Brett C., Aug 10, 2004
    #11
  12. Brett C.

    Greg Ewing Guest

    Brett C. wrote:
    > For my thesis (once the bloody thing stops throwing bugs at me) I am
    > going to need to collect stats on the frequency that atomic types in
    > local variables are applied to various opcodes and methods. That means
    > that I need something to collect stats off of.


    You're welcome to munge through the code of
    my 3 main Python projects:

    http://www.cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/~greg/python/Pyrex
    http://www.cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/~greg/python/Plex
    http://www.cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/~greg/python_gui

    --
    Greg Ewing, Computer Science Dept,
    University of Canterbury,
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    http://www.cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/~greg
    Greg Ewing, Aug 13, 2004
    #12
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