Possible to use Codewarrior 7 to program under WinXT?

Discussion in 'Java' started by BillJosephson, Jan 15, 2007.

  1. Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++, and just discovered on my
    bookshelve Codewarrior 7. It says Windows 95, 98, NT, 2000, ME. Can I
    develop a command line application that will work on my XT machine? A
    grahpical interface?

    Thanks a lot for any thoughts on this. I know I should get a newer
    compiler but if I could save the money for the time being that would be
    great.

    Thanks.
     
    BillJosephson, Jan 15, 2007
    #1
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  2. BillJosephson wrote:
    > Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++, and just discovered on my
    > bookshelve Codewarrior 7. It says Windows 95, 98, NT, 2000, ME. Can I
    > develop a command line application that will work on my XT machine? A
    > grahpical interface?
    >
    > Thanks a lot for any thoughts on this. I know I should get a newer
    > compiler but if I could save the money for the time being that would be
    > great.


    My guess is that it just means that those where the Windows
    versions available when Codewarrior 7 was released.

    It will probably work fine on XP.

    I don't know the product, but if it is professionally
    grade, then you can configure it to use a newer Java version
    (even though maybe syntax highlighting may not work optimal
    with the new Java 1.5 syntaxes).

    Arne
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Jan 15, 2007
    #2
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  3. BillJosephson

    IR Guest

    BillJosephson wrote:

    > Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++, and just discovered
    > on my bookshelve Codewarrior 7. It says Windows 95, 98, NT, 2000,
    > ME. Can I develop a command line application that will work on my
    > XT machine? A grahpical interface?


    Are you meaning Windows XP? If so, you should already be aware that XP
    is a descendant of the NT/2000 family (in opposition to the 9x
    family). So the answer to your question is: yes.

    > Thanks a lot for any thoughts on this. I know I should get a newer
    > compiler but if I could save the money for the time being that
    > would be great.


    FWIW, Microsoft's Visual C++ 2005 Express edition is free for
    download. Just google for it.

    Cheers,
    --
    IR
     
    IR, Jan 15, 2007
    #3
  4. BillJosephson

    IR Guest

    IR wrote:

    > BillJosephson wrote:
    >
    >> Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++


    I forgot to mention Eclipse for Java development (which is free also).

    Incidentally, you could also use it's CDT plugin for C++ development.


    Cheers,
    --
    IR
     
    IR, Jan 15, 2007
    #4
  5. BillJosephson

    Guest

    BillJosephson wrote:
    > Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++, and just discovered on my
    > bookshelve Codewarrior 7. It says Windows 95, 98, NT, 2000, ME. Can I
    > develop a command line application that will work on my XT machine? A
    > grahpical interface?


    Windows 2.11 (the earliest version I've ever seen), which requires an
    80286 processor, won't even run on an XT, let alone any of the Windows
    versions you mentioned. The XT is primarily useful as a DOS machine
    since it's limited to a maximum of ~1 MB of RAM. Since Windows 3.x and
    earlier, and those older DOS versions, don't support long filenames, it
    simply won't be possible to do real Java development.

    If you're looking to write Java code, you're going to need newer
    hardware. I recommend at least a Pentium I (80586 processor) as an
    absolute minimum. And then, for the Microsoft Windows family, you'll
    need Windows 2000 or newer (e.g., Windows XP) to use the current
    version of Java -- scrap Windows 95/98/ME since these are no longer
    supported by Microsoft (and Windows ME will be soon if it hasn't been
    discontinued already).

    You might also consider using Unix or Linux (I recommend NetBSD Unix
    with Gnome {GUI} because they aren't known to be memory hogs, and
    NetBSD has a very novice-friendly support community in IRC, etc.) if
    you can't afford the newest hardware since the hefty cost of a Windows
    license can be used to purchase better hardware.

    As for C++, you can probably do it with an XT, but that's beyond the
    scope of the Java newsgroup you posted this in.

    > Thanks a lot for any thoughts on this. I know I should get a newer
    > compiler but if I could save the money for the time being that would be
    > great.


    If I were you, I'd worry about getting a newer computer -- you
    obviously got more value out of your XT than anyone I know given that
    the 8088 processor is ancient hardware nowadays. Given the speed
    difference between an XT processor (typically up to 8 MHz) and modern
    PC processors (typically measured in GHz which is well over 1,000 times
    faster given additional enhancements such as Caching, Pipelining,
    HyperThreading, and so much more), it doesn't really make sense to
    consider using an XT for any levels of serious software development
    anymore.

    > Thanks.


    You're welcome, and congratulations on having an XT that actually still
    works (maybe the Guiness Book of World Records will add an entry for
    you in their next book?). =)
     
    , Jan 15, 2007
    #5
  6. wrote:
    > BillJosephson wrote:
    >> Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++, and just discovered on my
    >> bookshelve Codewarrior 7. It says Windows 95, 98, NT, 2000, ME. Can I
    >> develop a command line application that will work on my XT machine? A
    >> grahpical interface?

    >
    > Windows 2.11 (the earliest version I've ever seen), which requires an
    > 80286 processor, won't even run on an XT, let alone any of the Windows
    > versions you mentioned. The XT is primarily useful as a DOS machine
    > since it's limited to a maximum of ~1 MB of RAM. Since Windows 3.x and
    > earlier, and those older DOS versions, don't support long filenames, it
    > simply won't be possible to do real Java development.


    The other replies has assumed that XT was typo and the
    poster meant XP.

    Well - it do say XT.

    Arne
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Jan 15, 2007
    #6
  7. BillJosephson

    Guest

    Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    [sNip]
    > The other replies has assumed that XT was typo and the
    > poster meant XP.
    >
    > Well - it do say XT.


    Considering that one of my clients just got rid of their XT less than 2
    years ago (they sure got their money's worth out of it), it didn't seem
    all that unrealistic. Anyway, good-bye DOS, and hello Java & friends!
     
    , Jan 15, 2007
    #7
  8. BillJosephson

    Lew Guest

    BillJosephson wrote:
    >>> Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++


    IR wrote:
    > I forgot to mention Eclipse for Java development (which is free also).
    >
    > Incidentally, you could also use it's [sic] CDT plugin for C++ development.


    There are many IDEs (integrated development environments) available for Java
    development, and few not-so-I DEs like emacs, many of which are free. Java
    itself is free ("as in beer").

    GIYF.

    - Lew
     
    Lew, Jan 15, 2007
    #8
  9. BillJosephson

    red floyd Guest

    Lew wrote:
    > Java itself is free ("as in beer").
    >

    And in Speech. Sun is GPL'ing Java.
     
    red floyd, Jan 15, 2007
    #9
  10. BillJosephson

    red floyd Guest

    wrote:
    >
    >
    > Windows 2.11 (the earliest version I've ever seen), which requires an
    > 80286 processor, won't even run on an XT, let alone any of the Windows
    > versions you mentioned. The XT is primarily useful as a DOS machine
    > since it's limited to a maximum of ~1 MB of RAM. Since Windows 3.x and
    > earlier, and those older DOS versions, don't support long filenames, it
    > simply won't be possible to do real Java development.
    >


    No, 2.11 would run on a straight 8088. Not very well, but it *would* run.

    Even Windows 3.0 would run on an 8088 in real mode. Windows 3.1 was the
    first version (not counting Windows/386) which would not run on an 8088.
     
    red floyd, Jan 15, 2007
    #10
  11. BillJosephson

    IR Guest

    Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > The other replies has assumed that XT was typo and the
    > poster meant XP.
    >
    > Well - it do say XT.


    Two things make me think that the OP actually meant XP:

    - "WinXT" in the post subject
    - the mention of a _newer_ compiler

    But well, I guess only the OP can tell ;-)


    Cheers,
    --
    IR
     
    IR, Jan 15, 2007
    #11
  12. wrote:
    > BillJosephson wrote:
    > > Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++, and just discovered on my
    > > bookshelve Codewarrior 7. It says Windows 95, 98, NT, 2000, ME. Can I
    > > develop a command line application that will work on my XT machine? A
    > > grahpical interface?

    >
    > Windows 2.11 (the earliest version I've ever seen), which requires an
    > 80286 processor, won't even run on an XT, let alone any of the Windows
    > versions you mentioned. The XT is primarily useful as a DOS machine
    > since it's limited to a maximum of ~1 MB of RAM. Since Windows 3.x and
    > earlier, and those older DOS versions, don't support long filenames, it
    > simply won't be possible to do real Java development.
    >
    > If you're looking to write Java code, you're going to need newer
    > hardware. I recommend at least a Pentium I (80586 processor) as an
    > absolute minimum. And then, for the Microsoft Windows family, you'll
    > need Windows 2000 or newer (e.g., Windows XP) to use the current
    > version of Java -- scrap Windows 95/98/ME since these are no longer
    > supported by Microsoft (and Windows ME will be soon if it hasn't been
    > discontinued already).
    >
    > You might also consider using Unix or Linux (I recommend NetBSD Unix
    > with Gnome {GUI} because they aren't known to be memory hogs, and
    > NetBSD has a very novice-friendly support community in IRC, etc.) if
    > you can't afford the newest hardware since the hefty cost of a Windows
    > license can be used to purchase better hardware.
    >
    > As for C++, you can probably do it with an XT, but that's beyond the
    > scope of the Java newsgroup you posted this in.
    >
    > > Thanks a lot for any thoughts on this. I know I should get a newer
    > > compiler but if I could save the money for the time being that would be
    > > great.

    >
    > If I were you, I'd worry about getting a newer computer -- you
    > obviously got more value out of your XT than anyone I know given that
    > the 8088 processor is ancient hardware nowadays. Given the speed
    > difference between an XT processor (typically up to 8 MHz) and modern
    > PC processors (typically measured in GHz which is well over 1,000 times
    > faster given additional enhancements such as Caching, Pipelining,
    > HyperThreading, and so much more), it doesn't really make sense to
    > consider using an XT for any levels of serious software development
    > anymore.
    >
    > > Thanks.

    >
    > You're welcome, and congratulations on having an XT that actually still
    > works (maybe the Guiness Book of World Records will add an entry for
    > you in their next book?). =)




    Hi, sorry for my mistake, I meant a PC running windows XT. I have
    several machines I can use from my Dell D800 laptop to my dual opteron
    workstations.

    I fuzzily recall that there machines called XTs.

    I also remember going to a little dumpy shop in a strip mall that sold
    computers back in the 80s. They had two kinds, and I think the least
    powerful was an XT, and the more powerful was an AT and that was the
    only kinds of PCs then. The AT was an 80286 I think and the XT was just
    an 8086. The person who owned that little shop in Austin was named
    Michael Dell.
     
    BillJosephson, Jan 15, 2007
    #12
  13. BillJosephson wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > BillJosephson wrote:
    > > > Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++, and just discovered on my
    > > > bookshelve Codewarrior 7. It says Windows 95, 98, NT, 2000, ME. Can I
    > > > develop a command line application that will work on my XT machine? A
    > > > grahpical interface?

    > >
    > > Windows 2.11 (the earliest version I've ever seen), which requires an
    > > 80286 processor, won't even run on an XT, let alone any of the Windows
    > > versions you mentioned. The XT is primarily useful as a DOS machine
    > > since it's limited to a maximum of ~1 MB of RAM. Since Windows 3.x and
    > > earlier, and those older DOS versions, don't support long filenames, it
    > > simply won't be possible to do real Java development.
    > >
    > > If you're looking to write Java code, you're going to need newer
    > > hardware. I recommend at least a Pentium I (80586 processor) as an
    > > absolute minimum. And then, for the Microsoft Windows family, you'll
    > > need Windows 2000 or newer (e.g., Windows XP) to use the current
    > > version of Java -- scrap Windows 95/98/ME since these are no longer
    > > supported by Microsoft (and Windows ME will be soon if it hasn't been
    > > discontinued already).
    > >
    > > You might also consider using Unix or Linux (I recommend NetBSD Unix
    > > with Gnome {GUI} because they aren't known to be memory hogs, and
    > > NetBSD has a very novice-friendly support community in IRC, etc.) if
    > > you can't afford the newest hardware since the hefty cost of a Windows
    > > license can be used to purchase better hardware.
    > >
    > > As for C++, you can probably do it with an XT, but that's beyond the
    > > scope of the Java newsgroup you posted this in.
    > >
    > > > Thanks a lot for any thoughts on this. I know I should get a newer
    > > > compiler but if I could save the money for the time being that would be
    > > > great.

    > >
    > > If I were you, I'd worry about getting a newer computer -- you
    > > obviously got more value out of your XT than anyone I know given that
    > > the 8088 processor is ancient hardware nowadays. Given the speed
    > > difference between an XT processor (typically up to 8 MHz) and modern
    > > PC processors (typically measured in GHz which is well over 1,000 times
    > > faster given additional enhancements such as Caching, Pipelining,
    > > HyperThreading, and so much more), it doesn't really make sense to
    > > consider using an XT for any levels of serious software development
    > > anymore.
    > >
    > > > Thanks.

    > >
    > > You're welcome, and congratulations on having an XT that actually still
    > > works (maybe the Guiness Book of World Records will add an entry for
    > > you in their next book?). =)

    >
    >
    >
    > Hi, sorry for my mistake, I meant a PC running windows XT. I have
    > several machines I can use from my Dell D800 laptop to my dual opteron
    > workstations.
    >
    > I fuzzily recall that there machines called XTs.
    >
    > I also remember going to a little dumpy shop in a strip mall that sold
    > computers back in the 80s. They had two kinds, and I think the least
    > powerful was an XT, and the more powerful was an AT and that was the
    > only kinds of PCs then. The AT was an 80286 I think and the XT was just
    > an 8086. The person who owned that little shop in Austin was named
    > Michael Dell.



    Duh.....WindowsXP !! My brain took MLK day off.
     
    BillJosephson, Jan 15, 2007
    #13
  14. BillJosephson

    Lew Guest

    Lew wrote:
    >> Java itself is free ("as in beer").


    red floyd wrote:
    > And in Speech. Sun is GPL'ing Java.


    Personally I only care about the "as in beer" part.

    - Lew
     
    Lew, Jan 15, 2007
    #14
  15. BillJosephson

    Guest

    red floyd wrote:
    > wrote:
    >
    > > Windows 2.11 (the earliest version I've ever seen), which requires an
    > > 80286 processor, won't even run on an XT, let alone any of the Windows
    > > versions you mentioned. The XT is primarily useful as a DOS machine
    > > since it's limited to a maximum of ~1 MB of RAM. Since Windows 3.x and
    > > earlier, and those older DOS versions, don't support long filenames, it
    > > simply won't be possible to do real Java development.

    >
    > No, 2.11 would run on a straight 8088. Not very well, but it *would* run.
    >
    > Even Windows 3.0 would run on an 8088 in real mode. Windows 3.1 was the
    > first version (not counting Windows/386) which would not run on an 8088.


    Oh yeah, that's right. It wouldn't be of much use though because most
    of the useful applications for Windows 2.x required an 80286 processor,
    and for Windows 3.0 required an 80386 processor respectively. It was
    certainly enough for countless hours of Solitaire and Reversi [0]
    though.

    [0] "Othello" is the better-known name for that game.
     
    , Jan 16, 2007
    #15
  16. BillJosephson

    Guest

    BillJosephson wrote:
    > BillJosephson wrote:
    > > wrote:
    > > > BillJosephson wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++, and just discovered on my
    > > > > bookshelve Codewarrior 7. It says Windows 95, 98, NT, 2000, ME. Can I
    > > > > develop a command line application that will work on my XT machine? A
    > > > > grahpical interface?
    > > >
    > > > Windows 2.11 (the earliest version I've ever seen), which requires an
    > > > 80286 processor, won't even run on an XT, let alone any of the Windows
    > > > versions you mentioned. The XT is primarily useful as a DOS machine
    > > > since it's limited to a maximum of ~1 MB of RAM. Since Windows 3.x and
    > > > earlier, and those older DOS versions, don't support long filenames, it
    > > > simply won't be possible to do real Java development.
    > > >
    > > > If you're looking to write Java code, you're going to need newer
    > > > hardware. I recommend at least a Pentium I (80586 processor) as an
    > > > absolute minimum. And then, for the Microsoft Windows family, you'll
    > > > need Windows 2000 or newer (e.g., Windows XP) to use the current
    > > > version of Java -- scrap Windows 95/98/ME since these are no longer
    > > > supported by Microsoft (and Windows ME will be soon if it hasn't been
    > > > discontinued already).
    > > >
    > > > You might also consider using Unix or Linux (I recommend NetBSD Unix
    > > > with Gnome {GUI} because they aren't known to be memory hogs, and
    > > > NetBSD has a very novice-friendly support community in IRC, etc.) if
    > > > you can't afford the newest hardware since the hefty cost of a Windows
    > > > license can be used to purchase better hardware.
    > > >
    > > > As for C++, you can probably do it with an XT, but that's beyond the
    > > > scope of the Java newsgroup you posted this in.
    > > >
    > > > > Thanks a lot for any thoughts on this. I know I should get a newer
    > > > > compiler but if I could save the money for the time being that would be
    > > > > great.
    > > >
    > > > If I were you, I'd worry about getting a newer computer -- you
    > > > obviously got more value out of your XT than anyone I know given that
    > > > the 8088 processor is ancient hardware nowadays. Given the speed
    > > > difference between an XT processor (typically up to 8 MHz) and modern
    > > > PC processors (typically measured in GHz which is well over 1,000 times
    > > > faster given additional enhancements such as Caching, Pipelining,
    > > > HyperThreading, and so much more), it doesn't really make sense to
    > > > consider using an XT for any levels of serious software development
    > > > anymore.
    > > >
    > > > > Thanks.
    > > >
    > > > You're welcome, and congratulations on having an XT that actually still
    > > > works (maybe the Guiness Book of World Records will add an entry for
    > > > you in their next book?). =)

    > >
    > > Hi, sorry for my mistake, I meant a PC running windows XT. I have
    > > several machines I can use from my Dell D800 laptop to my dual opteron
    > > workstations.
    > >
    > > I fuzzily recall that there machines called XTs.
    > >
    > > I also remember going to a little dumpy shop in a strip mall that sold
    > > computers back in the 80s. They had two kinds, and I think the least
    > > powerful was an XT, and the more powerful was an AT and that was the
    > > only kinds of PCs then. The AT was an 80286 I think and the XT was just
    > > an 8086. The person who owned that little shop in Austin was named
    > > Michael Dell.

    >
    > Duh.....WindowsXP !! My brain took MLK day off.


    Heheh, that was fascinating! Thanks for not giving up on us. =)
     
    , Jan 16, 2007
    #16
  17. Lew wrote:
    > BillJosephson wrote:
    > >>> Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++

    >
    > IR wrote:
    > > I forgot to mention Eclipse for Java development (which is free also).
    > >
    > > Incidentally, you could also use it's [sic] CDT plugin for C++ development.

    >
    > There are many IDEs (integrated development environments) available for Java
    > development, and few not-so-I DEs like emacs, many of which are free. Java
    > itself is free ("as in beer").
    >
    > GIYF.
    >
    > - Lew


    Yeah, I looked at this a while back. I like the sound of jEdit but
    never could figure out how to get it configured like an IDE, with
    debugger window and a way to watch variables, etc. There just doesn't
    seem to be much approachable documentation.

    Would you recommend an IDE that sort of looke like Visual IDEs or
    Codewarrior? With an editor window, a debugger with conditional
    breakpoints, a way to watch varibles, an output window....all at the
    same time?
    Preferrably with lots of clear documentation?

    Thanks.....
     
    BillJosephson, Jan 16, 2007
    #17
  18. BillJosephson

    Ian Wilson Guest

    BillJosephson wrote:
    > Would you recommend an IDE that sort of looke like Visual IDEs or
    > Codewarrior? With an editor window, a debugger with conditional
    > breakpoints, a way to watch varibles, an output window....all at the
    > same time?
    > Preferrably with lots of clear documentation?


    I'm not familiar with Codewarrior but I suspect most IDEs would fit the
    requirements stated. I use Eclipse, it does all the above.
     
    Ian Wilson, Jan 16, 2007
    #18
  19. BillJosephson

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > Lew wrote:
    > > BillJosephson wrote:
    > > >>> Hi, I want to write a program in Java or C++

    > >
    > > IR wrote:
    > > > I forgot to mention Eclipse for Java development (which is free also).
    > > >
    > > > Incidentally, you could also use it's [sic] CDT plugin for C++ development.

    > >
    > > There are many IDEs (integrated development environments) available for Java
    > > development, and few not-so-I DEs like emacs, many of which are free. Java
    > > itself is free ("as in beer").
    > >
    > > GIYF.
    > >
    > > - Lew

    >
    > Yeah, I looked at this a while back. I like the sound of jEdit but
    > never could figure out how to get it configured like an IDE, with
    > debugger window and a way to watch variables, etc. There just doesn't
    > seem to be much approachable documentation.
    >
    > Would you recommend an IDE that sort of looke like Visual IDEs or
    > Codewarrior? With an editor window, a debugger with conditional
    > breakpoints, a way to watch varibles, an output window....all at the
    > same time?


    Eclipse. If you only need java support, you could also look at the free
    version of NetBeans.

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
    David Kerber, Jan 16, 2007
    #19
  20. BillJosephson

    Lew Guest

    David Kerber wrote:
    > Eclipse. If you only need java support, you could also look at the free
    > version of NetBeans.


    All versions of NetBeans are free.

    - Lew
     
    Lew, Jan 16, 2007
    #20
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