presenting an alternative when browser can't handle unicode symbols

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Jim Higson, Aug 23, 2004.

  1. Jim Higson

    Jim Higson Guest

    On my site I have:

    Русский

    which, normally written is:

    РуÑÑкий (Russian for "Russian")

    Now, most browsers handle this fine, but a few have problems. I there a way
    I can give alternate latin-alphabet text, such as:

    Russkij (nearest equivalent)

    to be used when the browser can't handle the full version? Hopefully this
    can be done with some simple markup.
     
    Jim Higson, Aug 23, 2004
    #1
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  2. Jim Higson <> wrote:

    > Русский

    - -
    > Now, most browsers handle this fine,


    Unfortunately this depends on what has been installed on the user's
    system. Unfortunately, Windows

    but a few have problems. I there
    > a way I can give alternate latin-alphabet text, such as:
    >
    > Russkij (nearest equivalent)
    >
    > to be used when the browser can't handle the full version? Hopefully
    > this can be done with some simple markup.
    >




    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Aug 23, 2004
    #2
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  3. Jim Higson <> wrote:

    > Русский - -
    > Now, most browsers handle this fine,


    Unfortunately this depends on what has been installed on the user's
    system. Unfortunately, Windows systems are often shipped without
    "internationalization support" pre-installed, and many users don't know
    what to do. Most modern browsers handle it fine _if_ the font in use
    contains Cyrillic letters. But this depends. There's not much you can do
    about it, as an author.

    > I there
    > a way I can give alternate latin-alphabet text, such as:
    >
    > Russkij (nearest equivalent)
    >
    > to be used when the browser can't handle the full version? Hopefully
    > this can be done with some simple markup.


    No, unfortunately not. It would be fine if there were - especially for
    characters that are very rarely available in common fonts, such as
    phonetic symbols.

    There's _something_ you can do, though (in addition to the apparent
    solution of putting a transliterated version in parentheses after the
    text). You can use the title attribute to suggest a "tooltip":

    <span lang="ru" title="Russkij (= Russian)"
    >Русский</span>


    (In the general case, transliteration of Russian is very problematic on
    the Web, since so many conflicting transliteration systems exist. For
    example, "russkij", "russkiy" and "russki" are all standard - by
    different standards. But in this case, the reader probably gets the idea
    anyway.)

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Aug 23, 2004
    #3
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