printing web page containing uncommon font

Discussion in 'HTML' started by ynoteh, Jan 17, 2008.

  1. ynoteh

    ynoteh Guest

    I know that a web page will not look as intended if the visitor does
    not have the specified font installed on their computer..
    But what about printing the web page? If the same visitor tries to
    print that page and does not have the font installed, will they get
    the intended font, or a substitute on their printout? I think a
    substitution?... I'm trying to grasp what the printer sees, but having
    a mental block!
     
    ynoteh, Jan 17, 2008
    #1
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  2. Scripsit ynoteh:

    > I know that a web page will not look as intended if the visitor does
    > not have the specified font installed on their computer..
    > But what about printing the web page?


    The situation is mostly the same. In rare cases, the system might lack a
    named font as a printer font but have it as a screen font, or vice
    versa.

    > If the same visitor tries to
    > print that page and does not have the font installed, will they get
    > the intended font, or a substitute on their printout?


    Of course he does not get the intended font. He might get a substitute
    font selected by the browser (e.g., specifying "Times" might result in
    "Times New Roman" being used, if "Times" does not exist), but more
    often, the browser's default font will be used.

    You might affect this by using a print style sheet, e.g.

    <style type="text/css">
    @media print { body { font-family: Cambria, sans-serif; } }
    </style>

    --
    Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
    http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Jan 17, 2008
    #2
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  3. ynoteh wrote:
    > I know that a web page will not look as intended if the visitor does
    > not have the specified font installed on their computer..
    > But what about printing the web page? If the same visitor tries to
    > print that page and does not have the font installed, will they get
    > the intended font, or a substitute on their printout? I think a
    > substitution?... I'm trying to grasp what the printer sees, but having
    > a mental block!


    Viewing or printing, same thing. if the user does have the font, it will
    not print. The font is not *embedded* in an HTML document. Look at it
    this way and HTML document is like script for a play, it test what the
    actors say and do, but not who the actors are. So on Broadway Lang and
    Broderick may stared. If the play is in your hometown, the play will be
    the same, but the actors will most likely not be Lang and Broderick but
    who is available. Same as your font in a HTML document. Unlike in media
    where fonts are embedded like PDFs, to complete the analogy, like a copy
    of a movie. If you have a copy of the '68 movie then wherever you play
    it the actors are always Mostel and Wilder.

    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
     
    Jonathan N. Little, Jan 17, 2008
    #3
  4. ynoteh

    mrcakey Guest

    "Jonathan N. Little" <> wrote in message
    news:9f838$478f715c$40cba7cd$...
    > ynoteh wrote:
    >> I know that a web page will not look as intended if the visitor does
    >> not have the specified font installed on their computer..
    >> But what about printing the web page? If the same visitor tries to
    >> print that page and does not have the font installed, will they get
    >> the intended font, or a substitute on their printout? I think a
    >> substitution?... I'm trying to grasp what the printer sees, but having
    >> a mental block!

    >
    > Viewing or printing, same thing. if the user does have the font, it will
    > not print. The font is not *embedded* in an HTML document. Look at it this
    > way and HTML document is like script for a play, it test what the actors
    > say and do, but not who the actors are. So on Broadway Lang and Broderick
    > may stared. If the play is in your hometown, the play will be the same,
    > but the actors will most likely not be Lang and Broderick but who is
    > available. Same as your font in a HTML document. Unlike in media where
    > fonts are embedded like PDFs, to complete the analogy, like a copy of a
    > movie. If you have a copy of the '68 movie then wherever you play it the
    > actors are always Mostel and Wilder.
    >
    > --
    > Take care,
    >
    > Jonathan


    Cool analogy!!!

    I was analogising to my friend for whom I'm building a site. I had (X)HTML
    as the building, CSS as the decor and JavaScript as the light switches. Was
    quietly chuffed with myself!

    +mrcakey
     
    mrcakey, Jan 17, 2008
    #4
  5. Jonathan N. Little wrote:
    > ynoteh wrote:
    >> I know that a web page will not look as intended if the visitor does
    >> not have the specified font installed on their computer..
    >> But what about printing the web page? If the same visitor tries to
    >> print that page and does not have the font installed, will they get
    >> the intended font, or a substitute on their printout? I think a
    >> substitution?... I'm trying to grasp what the printer sees, but having
    >> a mental block!

    >
    > Viewing or printing, same thing. if the user does have the font, it will
    > not print. The font is not *embedded* in an HTML document. Look at it
    > this way and HTML document is like script for a play, it test what the
    > actors say and do, but not who the actors are. So on Broadway Lang


    Lane.

    > and
    > Broderick may stared. If the play is in your hometown, the play will be
    > the same, but the actors will most likely not be Lang and Broderick but
    > who is available.


    It already wasn't Lane and Broderick by the time I got to the show on
    Broadway. It was Steven Weber and some English guy, and the English guy
    was terrible and Weber not so hot, and they were removed from the roles
    within weeks.

    > Same as your font in a HTML document. Unlike in media
    > where fonts are embedded like PDFs, to complete the analogy, like a copy
    > of a movie. If you have a copy of the '68 movie then wherever you play
    > it the actors are always Mostel and Wilder.


    But if you have a copy of the 2005 version of the movie then it's Lane
    and Broderick again.

    A better analogy might have been a script for Robin Hood where Robin's
    lines are annotated, "Spoken in an English accent", which means that
    actors who have an English accent installed will speak their parts in an
    English accent, while Kevin Costner, who evidently doesn't have an
    English accent installed, will speak American all through the film.
     
    Harlan Messinger, Jan 17, 2008
    #5
  6. Harlan Messinger wrote:

    > ..while Kevin Costner, who evidently doesn't have an English accent
    > installed, will speak American all through the film.


    Kevin Costner always just plays himself.

    I laughed all through the Robin Hood movie, every time he spoke. Not
    only American, but 20th century American slang.

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Vista
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Jan 17, 2008
    #6
  7. Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > Harlan Messinger wrote:
    >
    >> ..while Kevin Costner, who evidently doesn't have an English accent
    >> installed, will speak American all through the film.

    >
    > Kevin Costner always just plays himself.
    >
    > I laughed all through the Robin Hood movie, every time he spoke. Not
    > only American, but 20th century American slang.
    >

    The only movie Costner was any good in was "The War", and mostly because
    his part was small!

    And I have no idea how Lane became Lang? I meant Nathan not Jessica.

    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
     
    Jonathan N. Little, Jan 17, 2008
    #7
  8. ynoteh

    dorayme Guest

    In article <2d64a$478f93d8$40cba7cd$>,
    "Jonathan N. Little" <> wrote:

    > Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
    > > Harlan Messinger wrote:
    > >
    > >> ..while Kevin Costner, who evidently doesn't have an English accent
    > >> installed, will speak American all through the film.

    > >
    > > Kevin Costner always just plays himself.
    > >
    > > I laughed all through the Robin Hood movie, every time he spoke. Not
    > > only American, but 20th century American slang.
    > >

    > The only movie Costner was any good in was "The War", and mostly because
    > his part was small!


    Perhaps, but I liked his schmalzy Elliot Ness and Dancing with
    Wolves. I don't know why.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Jan 17, 2008
    #8
  9. ynoteh

    Neredbojias Guest

    Well bust mah britches and call me cheeky, on Thu, 17 Jan 2008 17:43:54
    GMT Jonathan N. Little scribed:

    >> Kevin Costner always just plays himself.
    >>
    >> I laughed all through the Robin Hood movie, every time he spoke. Not
    >> only American, but 20th century American slang.
    >>

    > The only movie Costner was any good in was "The War", and mostly
    > because his part was small!


    I partially agree but liked him in "Open Range". Also thought he was
    adequate in "Dances _With_ Wolves" although the excellence of the movie
    may have had something to do with it.

    --
    Neredbojias
    Riches are their own reward.
     
    Neredbojias, Jan 18, 2008
    #9
  10. dorayme wrote:

    > Perhaps, but I liked his schmalzy Elliot Ness and Dancing with
    > Wolves. I don't know why.
    >

    Can't imagine!

    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
     
    Jonathan N. Little, Jan 18, 2008
    #10
  11. ynoteh

    dorayme Guest

    In article <81c09$478ff395$40cba7cd$>,
    "Jonathan N. Little" <> wrote:

    > dorayme wrote:
    >
    > > Perhaps, but I liked his schmalzy Elliot Ness and Dancing with
    > > Wolves. I don't know why.
    > >

    > Can't imagine!


    I liked when he said to a young officer in a car, while they were
    waiting to make a bust, are you married, and when the yes came
    back he said, "It is nice being married". And in Wolves, I liked
    his early reading of his diary. With most films there is nothing
    at all I like about them, not a thing.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Jan 18, 2008
    #11
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