problem

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by wahid, Jan 10, 2010.

  1. wahid

    wahid Guest

    I m in a problem, i need those solution i will never disturb u people
    again ok but send me those .
     
    wahid, Jan 10, 2010
    #1
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  2. wahid

    Seebs Guest

    On 2010-01-10, Francis Glassborow <> wrote:
    > wahid wrote:
    >> I m in a problem, i need those solution i will never disturb u people
    >> again ok but send me those .

    >
    > If you use any solution given here you really will be stupid. The
    > regulars here are masters of writing programs for homework questions
    > that are either riddled with errors or use such contorted C that no
    > teacher is going to believe they are your work.
    >
    > If you cannot do any of the problems you have posted then you need to
    > talk with your teacher because it is only going to get harder from now
    > on. If you cannot do the basics you have already failed even if you do
    > not know it yet.


    Francis is, of course, correct. When I write answers to homework
    problems, they are such that they would make excellent study projects to
    learn interesting things about C, but horrible things to hand in to a
    teacher.

    -s
    --
    Copyright 2010, all wrongs reversed. Peter Seebach /
    http://www.seebs.net/log/ <-- lawsuits, religion, and funny pictures
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Game_(Scientology) <-- get educated!
     
    Seebs, Jan 10, 2010
    #2
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  3. On 01/09/2010 11:29 PM, wahid wrote:
    > I m in a problem, i need those solution i will never disturb u people
    > again ok but send me those .


    Out of curiosity, would you tell us why you need these answers so badly?
    These are really basic questions; if they're a prerequisite for
    something, you're going to be screwed later no matter what kind of help
    you get from this group.

    -Beej
     
    Beej Jorgensen, Jan 10, 2010
    #3
  4. On 10 Jan 2010 at 8:12, Seebs wrote:
    > On 2010-01-10, Francis Glassborow <> wrote:
    >> The regulars here are masters of writing programs for homework
    >> questions that are either riddled with errors or use such contorted C
    >> that no teacher is going to believe they are your work.

    >
    > Francis is, of course, correct. When I write answers to homework
    > problems, they are such that they would make excellent study projects to
    > learn interesting things about C, but horrible things to hand in to a
    > teacher.


    Yes, like the rest of the "regulars", your attitude stinks.

    In post after post, you bitch and complain when people ask questions
    that are "not about ISO C". Then when someone DOES ask an ISO C
    question, you don't want to answer that either - and not only do you
    refuse to answer it, but you pretend to give an answer which in reality
    is deliberately misleading.

    Hardly a constructive attitude, is it? To say nothing of being
    completely mean-spirited. Exactly what I've come to expect from you and
    your pals amongst the "regulars".
     
    Antoninus Twink, Jan 10, 2010
    #4
  5. wahid

    osmium Guest

    "Beej Jorgensen" wrote:

    > On 01/09/2010 11:29 PM, wahid wrote:
    >> I m in a problem, i need those solution i will never disturb u people
    >> again ok but send me those .

    >
    > Out of curiosity, would you tell us why you need these answers so badly?
    > These are really basic questions; if they're a prerequisite for
    > something, you're going to be screwed later no matter what kind of help
    > you get from this group.


    The questions are not from any decently designed course. There are trivial
    questions and then out of the blue, the towers of Hanoi. That looks more
    like he is browsing a text book, rather than taking a course. An
    alternative would be questions collected over the total span of a course.
    If it IS a course in process, it is pretty awful.
     
    osmium, Jan 10, 2010
    #5
  6. wahid

    scattered Guest

    On Jan 10, 8:26 am, "osmium" <> wrote:
    > "Beej Jorgensen" wrote:
    > > On 01/09/2010 11:29 PM, wahid wrote:
    > >> I m in a problem, i need those solution i will never  disturb u people
    > >> again ok but send me those .

    >
    > > Out of curiosity, would you tell us why you need these answers so badly?
    > > These are really basic questions; if they're a prerequisite for
    > > something, you're going to be screwed later no matter what kind of help
    > > you get from this group.

    >
    > The questions are not from any decently designed course.  There are trivial
    > questions and then out of the blue, the towers of Hanoi.  That looks more
    > like he is browsing a text book, rather than taking a course.  An
    > alternative would be questions collected over the total span of a course.


    I think this is the most likely explanation. An end of the semester
    deadline would also explain the apparent desperation. Perhaps these
    are missed assignments and the professor is giving him the opportunity
    to turn them in for partial credit.


    > If it IS a course in process, it is pretty awful.
     
    scattered, Jan 10, 2010
    #6
  7. In article <hicl0i$ivs$-september.org>,
    Richard <> wrote:
    ....
    >You have, after Heathfield, the biggest head in c.l.c.


    And we don't mean that in a good way...
     
    Kenny McCormack, Jan 10, 2010
    #7
  8. wahid

    Flash Gordon Guest

    Francis Glassborow wrote:
    > Antoninus Twink wrote:


    <snip>

    > Are you for real? How would doing someone's homework be helpful? It is


    <snip>

    Do you really think he posted them to be helpful? He's a troll and did
    it to try and get a rise out of people, because he knows a lot of people
    actually think it's a good idea if students at least attempt their homework.
    --
    Flash Gordon
     
    Flash Gordon, Jan 10, 2010
    #8
  9. On 10 Jan 2010 at 15:16, Francis Glassborow wrote:
    > Antoninus Twink wrote:
    >> Then when someone DOES ask an ISO C question, you don't want to
    >> answer that either - and not only do you refuse to answer it, but you
    >> pretend to give an answer which in reality is deliberately
    >> misleading.

    >
    > Are you for real? How would doing someone's homework be helpful? It is
    > the worst thing you could do for the OP. Yes the regulars are dead
    > right to try to persuade such students to do their work or at least
    > try to do so.


    Interesting. The "regulars" usually claim that the purpose of this group
    is to answer questions about ISO C. Making moral judgments about the
    motives of the questioners doesn't usually appear on the agenda - and in
    this case, on grounds of pure speculation (the OP hasn't said that the
    questions are homework).

    > Now what you have done is to provide him with answers that he will not
    > understand and will result in his having a very embarrassing meeting
    > with his teacher.


    With respect, that is a very patronizing attitude. I have given him some
    answers; what he does with them is his business.

    If I were him, I'd work through them, make sure I understood them (and
    look up or ask about anything that wasn't familiar), try to spot any
    errors or weaknesses or possible improvements, maybe try to understand
    some of the implementation choices made, and think for myself why they
    were made and what benefits and problems there would be with alternative
    choices.

    Personally, I think analyzing a solution to a problem one has thought
    about and failed to solve can be *extremely* conducive to understanding
    - in fact, it's one of the main ways I learn new things.

    As you say, maybe the questions are indeed homework and he will just
    turn the solutions in directly. That is his business - he has to take
    personal responsibility for his actions.

    > That assumes he will know where to find a curses library (which I
    > somewhat doubt he will manage)


    Then he can always ask here! But as the question explicitly required a
    solution using getch(), presumably the textbook or class he's using has
    covered this.

    > No we are not mean spirited, just the contrary we are trying to get an
    > apparently lazy or inattentive student to face up to his problems
    > early enough to remedy them.


    What evidence do you have that he's lazy or inattentive? Once again,
    that is pure speculation on your part. Judging someone in the worst
    possible light based on the evidence available - yes, I'd say that's
    mean-spirited.
     
    Antoninus Twink, Jan 10, 2010
    #9
  10. On 10 Jan 2010 at 19:47, Francis Glassborow wrote:
    > And we also decline to do 'homework' unless there is some evidence of
    > effort by the OP. Look up the phrase 'tough love'.


    I disagree with the policy of this royal "we", for the good reasons that
    I supplied in my previous post and which you didn't bother to address,
    or even acknowledge.

    > Oh and the OP will have plenty of examples of code to work through
    > either from the text book or from the class he is attending.


    Seeing different people's different styles of C can be enlightening. For
    example, many textbooks adopt a rather less careful approach to error
    handling than I used - the contrast may be instructive.
     
    Antoninus Twink, Jan 10, 2010
    #10
  11. In article <>,
    Antoninus Twink <> wrote:
    >On 10 Jan 2010 at 15:16, Francis Glassborow wrote:
    >> Antoninus Twink wrote:
    >>> Then when someone DOES ask an ISO C question, you don't want to
    >>> answer that either - and not only do you refuse to answer it, but you
    >>> pretend to give an answer which in reality is deliberately
    >>> misleading.

    >>
    >> Are you for real? How would doing someone's homework be helpful? It is
    >> the worst thing you could do for the OP. Yes the regulars are dead
    >> right to try to persuade such students to do their work or at least
    >> try to do so.

    >
    >Interesting. The "regulars" usually claim that the purpose of this group
    >is to answer questions about ISO C. Making moral judgments about the
    >motives of the questioners doesn't usually appear on the agenda - and in
    >this case, on grounds of pure speculation (the OP hasn't said that the
    >questions are homework).


    Yes. The hypocrisy is so thick you can cut it with a fork.
    As you say, there is no evidence (in the scientific, not legal sense)
    that this is homework. Just a bunch of speculation. Hint: If you
    (I'm talking to the regs here) actually think these problems *are* homework,
    then you are being thick as usual.
     
    Kenny McCormack, Jan 10, 2010
    #11
  12. On 2010-01-10, Antoninus Twink <> wrote:
    > On 10 Jan 2010 at 19:47, Francis Glassborow wrote:
    >> Oh and the OP will have plenty of examples of code to work through
    >> either from the text book or from the class he is attending.

    >
    > Seeing different people's different styles of C can be enlightening. For
    > example, many textbooks adopt a rather less careful approach to error
    > handling than I used - the contrast may be instructive.
    >


    A noble goal, but given that the OP has not constructed /any/ code,
    even code from his (possibly incompetent) professor or textbook, it
    seems a little unlikely that he'll choose to study /your/ code in
    depth.

    Had he posted his own solution and asked for criticism, he would
    have gotten excellent criticism, inincluding advice on making his
    code stable and more portable - and there almost always is good
    advice here, at least initially.

    (After that, once the OP has probably left, somehow it always turns
    into a fight about Standard this or real-life that, who has a Cray
    in his bedroom and why all the world's a Vax.)
     
    Andrew Poelstra, Jan 10, 2010
    #12
  13. On 10 Jan 2010 at 21:56, Andrew Poelstra wrote:
    > Had he posted his own solution and asked for criticism, he would
    > have gotten excellent criticism


    Really? That would make a change.

    He'd probably get the usual bullshit about having his main() function
    return an int, and not casting the return value of malloc(), and not
    returning an undefined status to the implementation, and the rest of the
    pedantic details the "regulars" delight in banging on about.

    Useful criticism about C style above the level of minute details, or
    choice of algorithm, or trade-offs to consider when implementing it? I
    doubt it, not if history is anything to go by C style above the level of
    minute details, or choice of algorithm, or trade-offs to consider when
    implementing it? I doubt it, not if history is anything to go by.

    > (After that, once the OP has probably left, somehow it always turns
    > into a fight about Standard this or real-life that, who has a Cray in
    > his bedroom and why all the world's a Vax.)


    Yeah, funny how that works, isn't it?
     
    Antoninus Twink, Jan 11, 2010
    #13
  14. wahid

    Eric Sosman Guest

    On 1/11/2010 3:54 PM, Tim Streater wrote:
    > On 11/01/2010 20:50, Antoninus Twink wrote:
    >> [...] [...]

    > Got the hiccups, Twinky? Spent too much time brown-nosing Spinny?


    Careful, Tim! He may threaten to sue!

    --
    Eric Sosman
    lid
     
    Eric Sosman, Jan 11, 2010
    #14
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