Proffesional programming

Discussion in 'C++' started by The Count, Mar 15, 2007.

  1. The Count

    The Count Guest

    I studied C++ programming in BSc3.Now I want to know more about C++
    programming in industry.What types of problems are solved using C++ in
    industry?What qualities should I have in order to become a successful C
    ++ developer? How good do I have to be in order to run my own software
    development company and what other requirements are necessary?
    The Count, Mar 15, 2007
    #1
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  2. The Count

    Guest

    On Mar 15, 1:38 am, "The Count" <> wrote:
    > I studied C++ programming in BSc3.Now I want to know more about C++
    > programming in industry.What types of problems are solved using C++ in
    > industry?What qualities should I have in order to become a successful C
    > ++ developer? How good do I have to be in order to run my own software
    > development company and what other requirements are necessary?



    Start with learning how to spell "Proffesional."
    , Mar 15, 2007
    #2
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  3. Re: Professional programming

    "The Count" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    : I studied C++ programming in BSc3.Now I want to know more
    : about C++ programming in industry. What types of problems
    : are solved using C++ in industry?

    C++ (like C) is most relevant to performance-oriented
    applications. Example uses in the industry are:
    - networking and server infrastructure
    - 3D rendering / virtual reality (including gaming...)
    - image processing (e.g. medical), signal processing
    - some automation/motion control applications
    - a number of embedded applications
    - desktop applications with a performance-critical component
    - other advanced data processing applications...
    In all these fields, small development teams may be using
    a high-level language and domain-specific libraries provided
    by third parties. But when something new/fundamental needss
    to be developed, C++ is usually the way to go.

    You will also find C++ used in a number of legacy applications,
    or in teams that have a C++ expertise. In many applications,
    a high-level language (C#, Java, and in some cases even VB) or
    a scripting language (Python, Ruby, ...) should be preferred
    nowadays.

    : What qualities should I have in order to become a successful
    : C++ developer?

    Keep learning. Be fast. Do not consider C++ as a solution,
    but as a tool to develop value-added solutions for a customer.
    Master other tools as well.

    : How good do I have to be in order to run my own software
    : development company and what other requirements are necessary?

    First of all, it takes some experience. Lots of reading too.
    A good starting point is probably:
    http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/ppbook/index.shtml


    I hope this helps,
    Ivan
    --
    http://ivan.vecerina.com/contact/?subject=NG_POST <- email contact form
    Ivan Vecerina, Mar 15, 2007
    #3
  4. The Count

    isoftor Guest

    Re: Professional programming

    On 3ÔÂ15ÈÕ, ÏÂÎç5ʱ36·Ö, "Ivan Vecerina"
    <> wrote:
    > "The Count" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    > : I studied C++ programming in BSc3.Now I want to know more
    > : about C++ programming in industry. What types of problems
    > : are solved using C++ in industry?
    >
    > C++ (like C) is most relevant to performance-oriented
    > applications. Example uses in the industry are:
    > - networking and server infrastructure
    > - 3D rendering / virtual reality (including gaming...)
    > - image processing (e.g. medical), signal processing
    > - some automation/motion control applications
    > - a number of embedded applications
    > - desktop applications with a performance-critical component
    > - other advanced data processing applications...
    > In all these fields, small development teams may be using
    > a high-level language and domain-specific libraries provided
    > by third parties. But when something new/fundamental needss
    > to be developed, C++ is usually the way to go.
    >
    > You will also find C++ used in a number of legacy applications,
    > or in teams that have a C++ expertise. In many applications,
    > a high-level language (C#, Java, and in some cases even VB) or
    > a scripting language (Python, Ruby, ...) should be preferred
    > nowadays.
    >
    > : What qualities should I have in order to become a successful
    > : C++ developer?
    >
    > Keep learning. Be fast. Do not consider C++ as a solution,
    > but as a tool to develop value-added solutions for a customer.
    > Master other tools as well.
    >
    > : How good do I have to be in order to run my own software
    > : development company and what other requirements are necessary?
    >
    > First of all, it takes some experience. Lots of reading too.
    > A good starting point is probably:
    > http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/ppbook/index.shtml
    >
    > I hope this helps,
    > Ivan
    > --http://ivan.vecerina.com/contact/?subject=NG_POST<- email contact form

    yeah,that's very useful! I learn much .
    isoftor, Mar 15, 2007
    #4
  5. Re: Professional programming

    "The Count" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >: How good do I have to be in order to run my own software
    >: development company and what other requirements are necessary?


    Running a software development company takes much more than technical skills.
    Most failed businesses are started by technically competent people with no
    business or management skills.

    Come to think of it, this is off-topic for this newsgroup.

    -dr
    Dave Rahardja, Mar 15, 2007
    #5
  6. On 15 Mar 2007 00:06:05 -0700, ""
    <> wrote:

    >On Mar 15, 1:38 am, "The Count" <> wrote:
    >> I studied C++ programming in BSc3.Now I want to know more about C++
    >> programming in industry.What types of problems are solved using C++ in
    >> industry?What qualities should I have in order to become a successful C
    >> ++ developer? How good do I have to be in order to run my own software
    >> development company and what other requirements are necessary?

    >
    >
    >Start with learning how to spell "Proffesional."


    Or how to misspell it.

    http://www.answers.com/professional&r=67

    -dr
    Dave Rahardja, Mar 15, 2007
    #6
  7. The Count

    mlimber Guest

    On Mar 15, 2:38 am, "The Count" <> wrote:
    > I studied C++ programming in BSc3.Now I want to know more about C++
    > programming in industry.What types of problems are solved using C++ in
    > industry?What qualities should I have in order to become a successful C
    > ++ developer? How good do I have to be in order to run my own software
    > development company and what other requirements are necessary?


    See the Creator's notes:

    http://www.research.att.com/~bs/applications.html

    and

    http://www.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq.html#use-C

    Cheers! --M
    mlimber, Mar 15, 2007
    #7
  8. wrote:
    > On Mar 15, 1:38 am, "The Count" <> wrote:
    >> I studied C++ programming in BSc3.Now I want to know more about C++
    >> programming in industry.What types of problems are solved using C++ in
    >> industry?What qualities should I have in order to become a successful C
    >> ++ developer? How good do I have to be in order to run my own software
    >> development company and what other requirements are necessary?

    >
    >
    > Start with learning how to spell "Proffesional."


    Reminds me of a business professor I know. He'd start each class in each
    semester by writing the following words on the board:

    business
    entrepreneur
    their there they're
    your you're
    its it's
    to too two

    and stated that any misspelling of any of those words on any homework,
    paper, or exam meant an automatic "F" on the work, regardless of its
    other merit.
    Walter Bright, Mar 16, 2007
    #8
  9. The Count

    kwikius Guest

    On 16 Mar, 03:01, Walter Bright <>
    wrote:

    > Reminds me of a business professor I know. He'd start each class in each
    > semester by writing the following words on the board:
    >
    > business
    > entrepreneur
    > their there they're
    > your you're
    > its it's
    > to too two
    >
    > and stated that any misspelling of any of those words on any homework,
    > paper, or exam meant an automatic "F" on the work, regardless of its
    > other merit.


    hmmm... accompanied with the words "Spell this f*cker!", a
    sledgehammer applied to the side of the head would certainly benefit
    this character. What a w*nker.

    I suggest you spelling enthusiasts should head for a suitable
    newsgroup. This stuff is O.T. on comp.lang.c++.


    regards
    Andy Little
    kwikius, Mar 16, 2007
    #9
  10. "kwikius" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    : On 16 Mar, 03:01, Walter Bright <>
    : wrote:
    :
    : > Reminds me of a business professor I know. He'd start each class in
    each
    : > semester by writing the following words on the board:
    : >
    : > business
    : > entrepreneur
    : > their there they're
    : > your you're
    : > its it's
    : > to too two
    : >
    : > and stated that any misspelling of any of those words on any
    homework,
    : > paper, or exam meant an automatic "F" on the work, regardless of its
    : > other merit.
    :
    : hmmm... accompanied with the words "Spell this f*cker!", a
    : sledgehammer applied to the side of the head would certainly benefit
    : this character. What a w*nker.
    Well, this is totally O.T. and uncalled for.

    : I suggest you spelling enthusiasts should head for a suitable
    : newsgroup. This stuff is O.T. on comp.lang.c++.

    In business, some spelling mistakes can seriously
    damage your credibility.
    In a critical C++ embedded system, you may have a strict
    requirement for use of RAII, or use of functions that are
    free of buffer overruns. Given simple rules, I would
    support a C++ teacher who would say upfront that some
    programming mistakes will guarantee you an F.

    Yet I'd be kinder with a poster in this NG, who might
    not be a native English speaker. (as a few of us...)

    Regards,
    Ivan
    --
    http://ivan.vecerina.com/contact/?subject=NG_POST <- email contact form
    Ivan Vecerina, Mar 16, 2007
    #10
  11. The Count

    kwikius Guest

    On 16 Mar, 08:13, "Ivan Vecerina"
    <> wrote:
    > "kwikius" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    > : On 16 Mar, 03:01, Walter Bright <>: wrote:
    >
    > :
    > : > Reminds me of a business professor I know. He'd start each class in
    > each
    > : > semester by writing the following words on the board:
    > : >
    > : > business
    > : > entrepreneur
    > : > their there they're
    > : > your you're
    > : > its it's
    > : > to too two
    > : >
    > : > and stated that any misspelling of any of those words on any
    > homework,
    > : > paper, or exam meant an automatic "F" on the work, regardless of its
    > : > other merit.
    > :
    > : hmmm... accompanied with the words "Spell this f*cker!", a
    > : sledgehammer applied to the side of the head would certainly benefit
    > : this character. What a w*nker.


    > Well, this is totally O.T. and uncalled for.


    Well. I shall have to mark You with an F. You declared my post O.T.
    but that post was already declaring the previous post O.T. haha!

    I suggest you point your finger at Walter Bright, not me. It was him
    that started this whole O.T discussion.

    I guess that using two sledge hammers simultaneously applied on each
    side, the guys head should end up like a pizza. I could put the O.E.D
    in a shredder and mix it with some scrambled egg and pump it back into
    the guys head. Lets see him trying to spell "Bigot" after that!

    regards
    Andy Little
    kwikius, Mar 16, 2007
    #11
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