putting a link on a logo

Discussion in 'HTML' started by wesbao, Aug 4, 2006.

  1. wesbao

    wesbao Guest

    How do I put a link on my logo?

    Thank you
    wesbao, Aug 4, 2006
    #1
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  2. wesbao wrote:

    > How do I put a link on my logo?


    With an anchor element, just like anything else.

    --
    David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
    Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
    David Dorward, Aug 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. wesbao

    mbstevens Guest

    On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 07:53:02 -0700, wesbao wrote:

    > How do I put a link on my logo?


    Same as any other image.

    <a href="someOther.html">
    <img
    src="images/mylogo.jpg"
    width="50"
    height="41"
    alt="logo" />
    </a>
    mbstevens, Aug 4, 2006
    #3
  4. mbstevens wrote:
    > alt="logo" />


    "logo" is pretty poor alt text. It should be a replacement for an image, not
    a brief description of it (sometimes a brief description is a good
    replacement, but not usually).

    Remember, if images are turned off, this is the same as:

    <a href="someOther.html">logo</a>

    Does that make sense?


    --
    David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
    Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
    David Dorward, Aug 4, 2006
    #4
  5. wesbao

    mbstevens Guest

    On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 16:09:00 +0100, David Dorward wrote:

    > mbstevens wrote:
    >> alt="logo" />

    >
    > "logo" is pretty poor alt text. It should be a replacement for an image, not
    > a brief description of it (sometimes a brief description is a good
    > replacement, but not usually).
    >
    > Remember, if images are turned off, this is the same as:
    >
    > <a href="someOther.html">logo</a>
    >
    > Does that make sense?


    Certainly does, but in the absence of more information about
    what his business or lack thereof is, 'logo' was about the best
    I could come up with.
    mbstevens, Aug 4, 2006
    #5
  6. wesbao wrote:
    > How do I put a link on my logo?


    Question is a little vague, a URL of your current efforts would help.

    If you mean make an image a clickable link then

    <a href="http://example.com"><img src="logoImage.jpg" alt="My Site"></a>

    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
    Jonathan N. Little, Aug 4, 2006
    #6
  7. On Fri, 4 Aug 2006, mbstevens wrote:

    > [...] in the absence of more information about
    > what his business or lack thereof is, 'logo' was about the best
    > I could come up with.


    alt="Foo corporation" (if the name of the corporation isn't already
    there in text alongside), or alt="" if it isn't. Works for any
    unspecified corporation, and it's obvious how to adapt it.

    alt="logo" is almost certainly wrong, and sets others a bad model to
    work from.
    Alan J. Flavell, Aug 4, 2006
    #7
  8. wesbao

    mbstevens Guest

    On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 16:52:37 +0100, Alan J. Flavell wrote:

    > On Fri, 4 Aug 2006, mbstevens wrote:
    >
    >> [...] in the absence of more information about
    >> what his business or lack thereof is, 'logo' was about the best
    >> I could come up with.

    >
    > alt="Foo corporation" (if the name of the corporation isn't already
    > there in text alongside), or alt="" if it isn't. Works for any
    > unspecified corporation, and it's obvious how to adapt it.
    >
    > alt="logo" is almost certainly wrong, and sets others a bad model to
    > work from.


    Well, as long as we're going to be _fanciful_, I would prefer:
    alt = "logo of the Foo corporation -- flock of vultures attacking a
    rabbit which is sitting atop a pyramid with an eye on it"

    The information that it _is_ a logo is of some importance to
    _some_ people.
    mbstevens, Aug 4, 2006
    #8
  9. mbstevens wrote:

    > Well, as long as we're going to be _fanciful_, I would prefer:
    > alt = "logo of the Foo corporation -- flock of vultures attacking a
    > rabbit which is sitting atop a pyramid with an eye on it"
    >
    > The information that it _is_ a logo is of some importance to
    > _some_ people.


    But is it important in the context of the document?

    In most cases the purpose of displaying a logo is to brand a page, not to
    inform people what the logo looks like. Your example might be reasonable on
    a page where the purpose is to display the company logo (although such a
    page would probably have some or all of that information in prose anyway).

    --
    David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
    Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
    David Dorward, Aug 4, 2006
    #9
  10. wesbao

    mbstevens Guest

    On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 17:49:38 +0100, David Dorward wrote:

    > mbstevens wrote:
    >
    >> Well, as long as we're going to be _fanciful_, I would prefer:
    >> alt = "logo of the Foo corporation -- flock of vultures attacking a
    >> rabbit which is sitting atop a pyramid with an eye on it"
    >>
    >> The information that it _is_ a logo is of some importance to
    >> _some_ people.

    >
    > But is it important in the context of the document?


    I believe that if I were blind, I would want to know not only
    what the company was, but that I was 'looking' at a logo.

    >
    > In most cases the purpose of displaying a logo is to brand a page, not to
    > inform people what the logo looks like.


    If the logo actually has an image that is not a
    non-objective image, the web author should also give a description of it.
    Again, that's what I would want to 'see' if I were unsighted. Do note that
    I peppered my last post with "some". I can't speak for everyone, but
    that's the kind of information I would want.

    (Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you and Allen are actually
    whacking me about what you might call sloppy pedagogy on my part.
    I shall consider myself properly chastised, and will include a full
    length, highly fanciful alt text on future examples -- or, at least
    I will if I feel energetic enough.)
    mbstevens, Aug 4, 2006
    #10
  11. wesbao

    wesbao Guest

    Thanks David:

    I must be doing something wrong or missing a character.

    I used this link code to my photo and if failed to link to my profile.

    <p><a href="URL/</p>

    Please help, what am i doing wrong?


    David Dorward wrote:
    > wesbao wrote:
    >
    > > How do I put a link on my logo?

    >
    > With an anchor element, just like anything else.
    >
    > --
    > David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
    > Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
    wesbao, Aug 4, 2006
    #11
  12. wesbao

    David Guest

    wesbao wrote:
    > Thanks David:
    >
    > I must be doing something wrong or missing a character.
    >
    > I used this link code to my photo and if failed to link to my profile.
    >
    > <p><a href="URL/</p>


    Note the missing ">" and the missing "</a>the correct way would be
    something like
    <p>
    <a href="URL">
    <img src="PATH TO SOME IMAGE" alt="This is my pic" height="height of
    image" width="width of image" />
    </a>
    </p>


    >
    > Please help, what am i doing wrong?
    >
    >
    > David Dorward wrote:


    <snip>
    David, Aug 4, 2006
    #12
  13. mbstevens wrote:
    > On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 17:49:38 +0100, David Dorward wrote:
    >> But is it important in the context of the document?


    > I believe that if I were blind, I would want to know not only
    > what the company was, but that I was 'looking' at a logo.


    If I'm trying to find out about the new Rocket Skates from Acme Inc then I'd
    want to know that I was looking at Acme Inc's website - but why would I
    care that it was a logo conveying that information?

    Oh, and alt text is not "for the blind", it is there for any user or bot
    that can't interpret images with their client and physical situation.

    BTW, the longdesc attribute provides a facility for providing a description
    of an image.

    > (Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you and Allen are actually
    > whacking me about what you might call sloppy pedagogy on my part.


    You gave a bad example, we called you on it, but now this has changed into a
    discussion on what constitutes appropriate alt text.

    --
    David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
    Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
    David Dorward, Aug 4, 2006
    #13
  14. wesbao

    mbstevens Guest

    On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 19:25:25 +0100, David Dorward wrote:

    > mbstevens wrote:
    >> On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 17:49:38 +0100, David Dorward wrote:
    >>> But is it important in the context of the document?

    >
    >> I believe that if I were blind, I would want to know not only
    >> what the company was, but that I was 'looking' at a logo.

    >
    > If I'm trying to find out about the new Rocket Skates from Acme Inc then I'd
    > want to know that I was looking at Acme Inc's website - but why would I
    > care that it was a logo conveying that information?


    It would be significant to me.

    I'm reminded of the scene in "Lost in
    Translation" where a director spends a full minute describing to Bill
    Murray exactly what he wants him to do. The translator then turns to
    Murray and says "He says, turn and smile to camera."

    If you're someone
    who has never seen a company's logo, and who will never be able to see
    it, it might be useful for the web author to give you a little extra
    information. When looking at future pages relating to that company,
    you can just see the word 'logo' toward the front of the description and
    will remember what you read previously.

    >
    > Oh, and alt text is not "for the blind", it is there for any user or bot
    > that can't interpret images with their client and physical situation.


    Of course, of course.
    Blind people are _one_ group that would depend on it.

    >
    > BTW, the longdesc attribute provides a facility for providing a description
    > of an image.


    ....and it is arguable just how much additional text should cause
    the move to a longdesc.
    mbstevens, Aug 4, 2006
    #14
  15. wesbao

    mbstevens Guest

    On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 10:31:06 -0700, wesbao wrote:

    > <p><a href="URL/</p>
    >
    > Please help, what am i doing wrong?


    The skeleton should look like:

    <p>
    <a href= <!-- insert URL here between quotation marks -->
    <img
    src=<!-- insert URL of image here between quotation marks -->
    height=<!-- insert height here between quotation marks -->
    width=<!-- insert width here between quotation marks -->
    alt="logo of the Foo corporation
    -- flock of vultures attacking a
    rabbit which is sitting atop a pyramid
    with an eye on it" />
    longdesc="...and the rabbit has tics,
    and the tics are full. It is a blustery day,
    but the vultures are of the particular Jamaican
    variety, known as John Crows, and are little affected
    (or 'impacted' as they say on the news) by this.
    The Pyrimid is Mayan, not Egyptian or Aztec. We're
    not altogether sure how a Mayan pyramid got onto
    Jamaica. But that's neither here nor there.
    Oh, and by the way, some people dislike longdescs."
    </a>
    </p>

    Hmm.
    Maybe that's too much information. :)

    Let's try something a little easier to read:


    <a href="*">
    <img
    src="*"
    height="*"
    width="*"
    alt="*" />
    </a>
    ________________
    ....where the asterisk ('*') is the stuff that _you_ fill in.
    mbstevens, Aug 4, 2006
    #15
  16. wesbao

    mbstevens Guest

    On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 18:54:09 +0000, mbstevens wrote:

    > On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 10:31:06 -0700, wesbao wrote:
    >
    >> <p><a href="URL/</p>
    >>
    >> Please help, what am i doing wrong?

    >
    > The skeleton should look like:
    >
    > <p>
    > <a href= <!-- insert URL here between quotation marks -->
    > <img
    > src=<!-- insert URL of image here between quotation marks -->
    > height=<!-- insert height here between quotation marks -->
    > width=<!-- insert width here between quotation marks -->
    > alt="logo of the Foo corporation
    > -- flock of vultures attacking a
    > rabbit which is sitting atop a pyramid
    > with an eye on it" />
    > longdesc="

    ___________________________________________________________________

    ....of course should have been a uri. But you can see
    why it sometimes is better to have a bit of a longer alt attribute
    than to send someone to another page, if the longdesc can be avoided.
    mbstevens, Aug 4, 2006
    #16
  17. mbstevens wrote:

    >> If I'm trying to find out about the new Rocket Skates from Acme Inc then
    >> I'd want to know that I was looking at Acme Inc's website - but why would
    >> I care that it was a logo conveying that information?

    >
    > It would be significant to me.


    Why? You are trying to find out about the Rocket Skates - what does the
    company logo have to do with that?

    > I'm reminded of the scene in "Lost in
    > Translation" where a director spends a full minute describing to Bill
    > Murray exactly what he wants him to do. The translator then turns to
    > Murray and says "He says, turn and smile to camera."


    I haven't see the film, but presumably the director is trying to describe
    exactly how he should act. The purpose of the conversation is to describe
    exactly how he should act. The purpose of the webpage is to describe the
    Rocket Skates, not the logo.

    > If you're someone
    > who has never seen a company's logo, and who will never be able to see
    > it, it might be useful for the web author to give you a little extra
    > information.


    Why? And what is wrong with longdesc?

    > When looking at future pages relating to that company,
    > you can just see the word 'logo' toward the front of the description and
    > will remember what you read previously.


    And then have more scrolling or listening to get past the description that
    you've already read / heard.

    The purpose of logos is usually to provide brand recognition. You see the
    logo, you associate it with the company at a glance. It isn't there so
    people can think of the company logo and go "Oooh, pretty".

    --
    David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
    Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
    David Dorward, Aug 4, 2006
    #17
  18. On Fri, 4 Aug 2006, mbstevens wrote:

    > On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 16:52:37 +0100, Alan J. Flavell wrote:
    >
    > > alt="Foo corporation" (if the name of the corporation isn't already
    > > there in text alongside), or alt="" if it isn't.


    By which, of course, I *meant* alt="" if it *is*. Sorry - changed
    horses in mid-sentence, and didn't spot it in proofreading.

    > Well, as long as we're going to be _fanciful_, I would prefer:
    > alt = "logo of the Foo corporation -- flock of vultures attacking a
    > rabbit which is sitting atop a pyramid with an eye on it"


    That is hardly ever a meaningful textual replacement for the author's
    intention in placing a logo on the page. It's there to establish or
    reinforce the brand (that's why it's a logo, after all).

    > The information that it _is_ a logo is of some importance to
    > _some_ people.


    Sure. Haven't you heard about the "title=" attribute, for supplying
    optional additional information about the element to which it's
    applied? Doesn't that seem to fit the description of what you
    just said that you wanted?
    Alan J. Flavell, Aug 4, 2006
    #18
  19. wesbao

    mbstevens Guest

    On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 21:25:23 +0100, Alan J. Flavell wrote:

    > That is hardly ever a meaningful textual replacement for the author's
    > intention in placing a logo on the page. It's there to establish or
    > reinforce the brand (that's why it's a logo, after all).
    > .........
    > Sure. Haven't you heard about the "title=" attribute, for supplying
    > optional additional information about the element to which it's
    > applied? Doesn't that seem to fit the description of what you
    > just said that you wanted?



    * It is a bad idea to try to guess an author's intention.
    Authors can intend a huge range of things.
    Their bosses can intend a huge range of things.

    * The title of a logo is not necessarily "logo".

    * It _is_ a good idea to try to guess what a visitor will want
    from a page. But an author should allow for a wide range
    of visitors. I explained to David why some blind persons
    might like to have the information that what they are 'looking'
    at is a logo.
    mbstevens, Aug 4, 2006
    #19
  20. wesbao

    mbstevens Guest

    On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 21:23:26 +0100, David Dorward wrote:

    > Why? You are trying to find out about the Rocket Skates - what does the
    > company logo have to do with that?


    You don't give the appearance of reading ahead. I explained it in a
    following paragraph: "When looking at future pages relating to that
    company, you can just see the word 'logo' toward the front of the
    description and will remember what you read previously."

    >
    >> I'm reminded of the scene in "Lost in
    >> Translation" where a director spends a full minute describing to Bill
    >> Murray exactly what he wants him to do. The translator then turns to
    >> Murray and says "He says, turn and smile to camera."

    >
    > I haven't see the film, but presumably the director is trying to describe
    > exactly how he should act. The purpose of the conversation is to describe
    > exactly how he should act. The purpose of the webpage is to describe the
    > Rocket Skates, not the logo.


    As I said to Alan: "It is a bad idea to try to guess an author's intention.
    Authors can intend a huge range of things.
    Their bosses can intend a huge range of things."

    We don't even know exactly what the page is at this point, and you're
    telling me the author's intentions. That is a very hard thing to support.

    >
    >> If you're someone
    >> who has never seen a company's logo, and who will never be able to see
    >> it, it might be useful for the web author to give you a little extra
    >> information.

    >
    > Why? And what is wrong with longdesc?


    I have no objection to it, but it is up to me as the author exactly
    what goes into it. You seem to want to second guess the intentions
    of any web page author that uses a logo.

    >
    >> When looking at future pages relating to that company,
    >> you can just see the word 'logo' toward the front of the description and
    >> will remember what you read previously.

    >
    > And then have more scrolling or listening to get past the description that
    > you've already read / heard.


    I don't have a reader, but I would imagine that when you hear "logo" you
    could hit some key to skip further reading.

    >
    > The purpose of logos is usually to provide brand recognition. You see the
    > logo, you associate it with the company at a glance. It isn't there so
    > people can think of the company logo and go "Oooh, pretty".


    No, but you may be taking away some of the 'poetry' of the logo by not
    describing it. I'd rather hear "logo, Nike Swoop!" than "Nike Company".
    I think you're being too literal. There are whole ranges of information
    that an author _might_ want to use, not all of them purely
    factual.
    mbstevens, Aug 4, 2006
    #20
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