Pystone benchmark: Win vs. Linux (again)

Discussion in 'Python' started by Franco Fiorese, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. Hi all,
    I am relatively new about Python benchmarks.
    After some experiments I found that Python on my PC Windows XP has a
    relevant higher performance than on Linux. The simple test using
    pystone.py shows this:

    * Windows XP Pro: 16566.7 pystones/second
    * Linux (kernel 2.6.9 NPTL): 12346.2 pystones/second

    I have repeated the test, on Linux, also with other distributions and
    kernel but a relevant difference still exists with Windows offering a
    better performance.

    Is there any way, that you know, to get better performance under Linux?

    regards
    Franco
    Franco Fiorese, Jan 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. Franco Fiorese

    Simon John Guest

    Franco Fiorese wrote:

    > Is there any way, that you know, to get better performance under

    Linux?

    Build Python yourself, using relevant CFLAGS and TARGET for your
    processor?

    I've always noticed that Windows Python takes a lot longer to startup
    than Linux, but never really looked at runtime performance.
    Simon John, Jan 29, 2005
    #2
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  3. Franco Fiorese wrote:

    > I am relatively new about Python benchmarks.
    > After some experiments I found that Python on my PC Windows XP has a relevant higher performance
    > than on Linux. The simple test using pystone.py shows this:
    >
    > * Windows XP Pro: 16566.7 pystones/second
    > * Linux (kernel 2.6.9 NPTL): 12346.2 pystones/second


    what Python version are you using for these tests? what Windows build?

    </F>
    Fredrik Lundh, Jan 29, 2005
    #3
  4. Franco Fiorese

    Paul Rubin Guest

    Franco Fiorese <> writes:
    > * Windows XP Pro: 16566.7 pystones/second
    > * Linux (kernel 2.6.9 NPTL): 12346.2 pystones/second
    >
    > I have repeated the test, on Linux, also with other distributions and
    > kernel but a relevant difference still exists with Windows offering a
    > better performance.
    >
    > Is there any way, that you know, to get better performance under Linux?


    I hate to say this but the Windows C compiler may be beating GCC in
    output code. Doing anything about it may require a lot of careful
    profiling and tuning.
    Paul Rubin, Jan 29, 2005
    #4
  5. Paul Rubin <http://> wrote:

    > Franco Fiorese <> writes:
    > > * Windows XP Pro: 16566.7 pystones/second
    > > * Linux (kernel 2.6.9 NPTL): 12346.2 pystones/second
    > >
    > > I have repeated the test, on Linux, also with other distributions and
    > > kernel but a relevant difference still exists with Windows offering a
    > > better performance.
    > >
    > > Is there any way, that you know, to get better performance under Linux?

    >
    > I hate to say this but the Windows C compiler may be beating GCC in
    > output code. Doing anything about it may require a lot of careful
    > profiling and tuning.


    ....or (just as hypothetically) purchasing some commercial compiler might
    help, under the assumption that the optimization and code generation of
    the compiler are the issues here. I have nothing but hearsay to go on,
    but IBM's compiler for PPC chips, and Intel's compiler for Intel chips,
    appear to claim that they have excellent code generation, for example.


    Alex
    Alex Martelli, Jan 29, 2005
    #5
  6. Franco Fiorese

    Paul Rubin Guest

    (Alex Martelli) writes:
    > ...or (just as hypothetically) purchasing some commercial compiler might
    > help, under the assumption that the optimization and code generation of
    > the compiler are the issues here. I have nothing but hearsay to go on,
    > but IBM's compiler for PPC chips, and Intel's compiler for Intel chips,
    > appear to claim that they have excellent code generation, for example.


    Perhaps so. Actually that benchmark difference may have come from
    differing Python versions. I've heard that Intel cc typically beats
    gcc by 5% or so for integer code. There are various benchmarks
    floating around. But that Pystone measurement differed by
    considerably more.
    Paul Rubin, Jan 29, 2005
    #6
  7. Fredrik Lundh wrote:
    > Franco Fiorese wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I am relatively new about Python benchmarks.
    >>After some experiments I found that Python on my PC Windows XP has a relevant higher performance
    >>than on Linux. The simple test using pystone.py shows this:
    >>
    >> * Windows XP Pro: 16566.7 pystones/second
    >> * Linux (kernel 2.6.9 NPTL): 12346.2 pystones/second

    >
    >
    > what Python version are you using for these tests? what Windows build?
    >
    > </F>
    >
    >
    >

    I have performed the test under Linux Fedora Core 3 and Windows XP
    Professional SP2.
    This is the info about my system and Python (from /proc/cpuinfo):

    processor : 0
    vendor_id : GenuineIntel
    cpu family : 6
    model : 8
    model name : Pentium III (Coppermine)
    stepping : 10
    cpu MHz : 896.418
    cache size : 256 KB
    fdiv_bug : no
    hlt_bug : no
    f00f_bug : no
    coma_bug : no
    fpu : yes
    fpu_exception : yes
    cpuid level : 2
    wp : yes
    flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 mtrr pge mca cmov
    pat pse36 mmx fxsr sse
    bogomips : 1769.47

    System RAM: 256MB
    -------------------------------------

    Under Linux The python version is 2.3.4 (release 11) stock Fedora 3 RPM
    (compiled from python-2.3.4-11.src.rpm)

    Under Windows the Python version is 2.3.4
    -------------------------------------

    Anyway I will try to build the latest version (2.4) from source using
    the best possible optmizations with the gcc compiler.

    Being the pystone a benchmark that exercises mostly the compiler
    optimizations I wonder if there is a benchmark that could bring up the
    whole capabilities of the operating system (I/O, multithreading, memory
    allocation, etc.).
    Franco Fiorese, Jan 29, 2005
    #7
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