Python and binary compatibility

Discussion in 'Python' started by Ambush Commander, Jan 25, 2008.

  1. I'm a newbie to Python; various packages I've used in the past (Lyx,
    LilyPond and Inkscape, to name a few) have bundled Python with them
    for various scripting needs, and Cygwin also had an install lying
    around, so when I started to use Mercurial (also Python) I decided
    that I'd consolidate all of these installations into a single Windows
    installation for general use, as well as for me to properly learn the
    language.

    Whoo, it's been a journey.

    The primary problem involves binary extensions to the Python
    interpreter itself, which Mercurial uses. The only C compiler I have
    on my machine is Visual Studio 2005 Express, but Python's binary
    distribution was compiled with VS 2003, so the installer refuses to
    compile the package. I understand that Python 3 uses VS 2008, but
    that's no good for me as it will probably break all of the scripts.

    So, I'm trying to figure out what I should do. Mercurial's binary
    distribution was built using MingW, and I do have Cygwin lying around
    but I'd like to go for the "native" solution for the most speed. If I
    use MingW, I might as well use their pre-packaged binary. I could
    recompile Python with MSVC 2005, but I expect that will be its own can
    of worms. ActiveState is closed source and appears to have the wrong
    MSVC dependencies. All my troubles could apparently be fixed if I
    could acquire a copy of VS 2003, but Microsoft has made it incredibly
    difficult to find the download for it (I don't think it exists).

    Any suggestions?
     
    Ambush Commander, Jan 25, 2008
    #1
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  2. > All my troubles could apparently be fixed if I
    > could acquire a copy of VS 2003, but Microsoft has made it incredibly
    > difficult to find the download for it (I don't think it exists).
    >
    > Any suggestions?


    You can get copies of VS 2003 from ebay fairly easily.

    Regards,
    Martin
     
    Martin v. Löwis, Jan 25, 2008
    #2
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  3. Ambush Commander schrieb:
    > I'm a newbie to Python; various packages I've used in the past (Lyx,
    > LilyPond and Inkscape, to name a few) have bundled Python with them
    > for various scripting needs, and Cygwin also had an install lying
    > around, so when I started to use Mercurial (also Python) I decided
    > that I'd consolidate all of these installations into a single Windows
    > installation for general use, as well as for me to properly learn the
    > language.
    >
    > Whoo, it's been a journey.
    >
    > The primary problem involves binary extensions to the Python
    > interpreter itself, which Mercurial uses. The only C compiler I have
    > on my machine is Visual Studio 2005 Express, but Python's binary
    > distribution was compiled with VS 2003, so the installer refuses to
    > compile the package. I understand that Python 3 uses VS 2008, but
    > that's no good for me as it will probably break all of the scripts.
    >
    > So, I'm trying to figure out what I should do. Mercurial's binary
    > distribution was built using MingW, and I do have Cygwin lying around
    > but I'd like to go for the "native" solution for the most speed. If I
    > use MingW, I might as well use their pre-packaged binary. I could
    > recompile Python with MSVC 2005, but I expect that will be its own can
    > of worms. ActiveState is closed source and appears to have the wrong
    > MSVC dependencies. All my troubles could apparently be fixed if I
    > could acquire a copy of VS 2003, but Microsoft has made it incredibly
    > difficult to find the download for it (I don't think it exists).
    >
    > Any suggestions?


    Maybe this helps?

    http://www.develer.com/oss/GccWinBinaries

    Thomas
     
    Thomas Heller, Jan 25, 2008
    #3
  4. Ambush Commander wrote:
    > The primary problem involves binary extensions to the Python
    > interpreter itself, which Mercurial uses. The only C compiler I have
    > on my machine is Visual Studio 2005 Express, but Python's binary
    > distribution was compiled with VS 2003, so the installer refuses to
    > compile the package. I understand that Python 3 uses VS 2008, but
    > that's no good for me as it will probably break all of the scripts.


    Python 2.6 and 3.0 will use VS 2008. It's not recommended to compile
    Python extension with a different compiler but you can compile the
    extension with 2003. It will work as long as the extensions don't
    exchange file handlers or other handlers. Google for "Mixing CRTs" will
    reveal more details.

    > So, I'm trying to figure out what I should do. Mercurial's binary
    > distribution was built using MingW, and I do have Cygwin lying around
    > but I'd like to go for the "native" solution for the most speed. If I
    > use MingW, I might as well use their pre-packaged binary. I could
    > recompile Python with MSVC 2005, but I expect that will be its own can
    > of worms. ActiveState is closed source and appears to have the wrong
    > MSVC dependencies. All my troubles could apparently be fixed if I
    > could acquire a copy of VS 2003, but Microsoft has made it incredibly
    > difficult to find the download for it (I don't think it exists).


    You can use MinGW32 to compile the extension, too. Or use the free
    toolchain as described at
    http://wiki.python.org/moin/Building_Python_with_the_free_MS_C_Toolkit

    Christian
     
    Christian Heimes, Jan 25, 2008
    #4
  5. Christian Heimes wrote:
    > You can use MinGW32 to compile the extension, too. Or use the free
    > toolchain as described at
    > http://wiki.python.org/moin/Building_Python_with_the_free_MS_C_Toolkit


    That page has a link to the Microsoft Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 page, which
    then says it's been discontinued and to use Visual C++ 2005 Express
    Edition. Sigh...

    j
     
    Joshua Kugler, Jan 25, 2008
    #5
  6. Joshua Kugler wrote:
    > That page has a link to the Microsoft Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 page, which
    > then says it's been discontinued and to use Visual C++ 2005 Express
    > Edition. Sigh...


    You can still find some copies of the free toolkit on the internet.

    Christian
     
    Christian Heimes, Jan 26, 2008
    #6
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