Python and Flaming Thunder

Discussion in 'Python' started by Dave Parker, May 13, 2008.

  1. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Guest

    I've read that one of the design goals of Python was to create an easy-
    to-use English-like language. That's also one of the design goals of
    Flaming Thunder at http://www.flamingthunder.com/ , which has proven
    easy enough for even elementary school students, even though it is
    designed for scientists, mathematicians and engineers.
     
    Dave Parker, May 13, 2008
    #1
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  2. Dave Parker

    Guest

    On May 12, 6:39 pm, Dave Parker <> wrote:
    > I've read that one of the design goals of Python was to create an easy-
    > to-use English-like language.  That's also one of the design goals of
    > Flaming Thunder athttp://www.flamingthunder.com/ , which has proven
    > easy enough for even elementary school students, even though it is
    > designed for scientists, mathematicians and engineers.


    Can you render some furniture for me... to try to see some human
    posture to lowest energy levels.
     
    , May 13, 2008
    #2
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  3. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Guest

    On May 12, 6:32 pm, wrote:
    > Can you render some furniture for me... to try to see some human
    > posture to lowest energy levels.


    Not yet; Flaming Thunder doesn't have built-in graphics yet. But
    we're incorporating the graphics from www.dpgraph.com , so when that's
    finished, then yes Flaming Thunder will be able to render furniture
    and calculate energy levels.

    If I remember correctly, I think that NASA did some experiments many
    years ago on human posture and found that laying back (like the
    astronauts do at takeoff) minimized stress on the human body due to
    high g-forces.
     
    Dave Parker, May 13, 2008
    #3
  4. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Guest

    On May 12, 6:32 pm, wrote:
    > Can you render some furniture for me... to try to see some human
    > posture to lowest energy levels.


    I couldn't find any furniture created using DPGraph, but the math art
    gallery at http://www.dpgraph.com/math-art.html has a sailboat, an
    F15, Tux (the Linux penguin), a lampshade, and lots of other things
    that will soon be doable in Flaming Thunder.
     
    Dave Parker, May 13, 2008
    #4
  5. Dave Parker

    Guest

    On May 12, 7:59 pm, Dave Parker <> wrote:
    > On May 12, 6:32 pm, wrote:
    >
    > > Can you render some furniture for me... to try to see some human
    > > posture to lowest energy levels.

    >
    > I couldn't find any furniture created using DPGraph, but the math art
    > gallery athttp://www.dpgraph.com/math-art.htmlhas a sailboat, an
    > F15, Tux (the Linux penguin), a lampshade, and lots of other things
    > that will soon be doable in Flaming Thunder.


    Mine's been always messing up the color wheel. Do you see anything
    analytic* / theoretically necessary / a priori / physical / physically
    induced about that?

    *Now that's a word from Philosophy Syntax--- pertaining to inherent
    definitions of words, any and all.
     
    , May 13, 2008
    #5
  6. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Guest

    On May 12, 7:12 pm, wrote:
    > Mine's been always messing up the color wheel.


    Messing up in what way? Are you using the colors to visualize
    something?
     
    Dave Parker, May 13, 2008
    #6
  7. Dave Parker

    Guest

    On May 12, 8:18 pm, Dave Parker <> wrote:
    > On May 12, 7:12 pm, wrote:
    >
    > > Mine's been always messing up the color wheel.

    >
    > Messing up in what way?  Are you using the colors to visualize
    > something?


    In a manner of speaking. I'm a first-time-live Information scientist,
    just out of work. LIS at school and plenty of computer study, which
    is fine. Yes, I am trying to visualize something.
     
    , May 13, 2008
    #7
  8. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Guest

    On May 12, 7:20 pm, wrote:
    > Yes, I am trying to visualize something.


    If it is related to making furniture comfortable for humans, have you
    considered painting the furniture with thermochromic paint (
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermochromism )? It changes color in
    response to temperature, which in part is determined by how hard a
    body is pressed against it because close contact tends to trap heat.
    An evenly distributed color might indicated evenly distributed
    pressure.
     
    Dave Parker, May 13, 2008
    #8
  9. Dave Parker

    Guest

    On May 12, 8:36 pm, Dave Parker <> wrote:
    > On May 12, 7:20 pm, wrote:
    >
    > > Yes, I am trying to visualize something.

    >
    > If it is related to making furniture comfortable for humans, have you
    > considered painting the furniture with thermochromic paint (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermochromism)?  It changes color in
    > response to temperature, which in part is determined by how hard a
    > body is pressed against it because close contact tends to trap heat.
    > An evenly distributed color might indicated evenly distributed
    > pressure.


    I do hold an argument that one can make too much money for one's own
    good quality of life. Am I trying to visualize thermal (and ergo
    possibly chemical too) gradients (thermovoltaic)? Yes in part. I'm
    pretty generally interested, but where can print layout take you?
    Microsales?
     
    , May 13, 2008
    #9
  10. Dave Parker wrote:

    > On May 12, 7:20 pm, wrote:
    >>Yes, I am trying to visualize something.

    >
    > If it is related to making furniture comfortable for humans, have you
    > considered painting the furniture with thermochromic paint (
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermochromism )? It changes color in
    > response to temperature, which in part is determined by how hard a
    > body is pressed against it because close contact tends to trap heat.
    > An evenly distributed color might indicated evenly distributed
    > pressure.


    Don't let yourself be irritated by castironpi - he's the virtual equivalent
    of a mumbling mad man in this group. Ignorance serves best as remedy - and
    getting a filter to work, as I did (so I only see his postings being
    quoted... a huge relief!)

    Diez
     
    Diez B. Roggisch, May 13, 2008
    #10
  11. Dave Parker

    Guest

    On May 13, 4:18 am, "Diez B. Roggisch" <> wrote:
    > Dave Parker wrote:
    > > On May 12, 7:20 pm, wrote:
    > >>Yes, I am trying to visualize something.

    >
    > > If it is related to making furniture comfortable for humans, have you
    > > considered painting the furniture with thermochromic paint (
    > >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermochromism)?  It changes color in
    > > response to temperature, which in part is determined by how hard a
    > > body is pressed against it because close contact tends to trap heat.
    > > An evenly distributed color might indicated evenly distributed
    > > pressure.

    >
    > Don't let yourself be irritated by castironpi - he's the virtual equivalent
    > of a mumbling mad man in this group. Ignorance serves best as remedy - and
    > getting a filter to work, as I did (so I only see his postings being
    > quoted... a huge relief!)
    >
    > Diez


    I hate to ignore work. Who is the non-virtual equivalent mumble?
     
    , May 13, 2008
    #11
  12. Dave Parker

    Guest

    On May 13, 4:52 am, wrote:
    > On May 13, 4:18 am, "Diez B. Roggisch" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Dave Parker wrote:
    > > > On May 12, 7:20 pm, wrote:
    > > >>Yes, I am trying to visualize something.

    >
    > > > If it is related to making furniture comfortable for humans, have you
    > > > considered painting the furniture with thermochromic paint (
    > > >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermochromism)? It changes color in
    > > > response to temperature, which in part is determined by how hard a
    > > > body is pressed against it because close contact tends to trap heat.
    > > > An evenly distributed color might indicated evenly distributed
    > > > pressure.

    >
    > > Don't let yourself be irritated by castironpi - he's the virtual equivalent
    > > of a mumbling mad man in this group. Ignorance serves best as remedy - and
    > > I only see his postings being
    > > quoted... a huge relief!)

    >
    > > Diez

    >
    > I hate to ignore work.  Who is the non-virtual equivalent mumble?- Hide quoted text -


    However, that's just the sunrise I would be talking about. How are
    the soft drinks here? Does anyone else have a t.v.? I don't like
    mine or have one.
     
    , May 13, 2008
    #12
  13. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Guest

    On May 12, 11:52 pm, wrote:
    > I do hold an argument that one can make too much money for one's own
    > good quality of life.


    As do I; I think there is an optimal amount. Too little, and you
    waste time gathering food. Too much, and you waste time gathering
    money.

    > Am I trying to visualize thermal (and ergo
    > possibly chemical too) gradients (thermovoltaic)?  Yes in part.


    Some of those DPGraph (and soon, Flaming Thunder) may be able to help
    with.

    > I'm pretty generally interested, but where can print layout take you?


    Not far, especially with books disappearing. Our library says that
    these days, only 25% of their checkouts are books; the other 75% are
    DVDs, CDs, etc.

    > Microsales?


    And getting microer every day.
     
    Dave Parker, May 13, 2008
    #13
  14. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Guest

    > Don't let yourself be irritated by castironpi

    I'm not the sort to get irritated by anyone. There is value in all
    interaction. Flaming Thunder is itself the averaging of interactions
    with many computer languages and conversations with many people, so as
    to create a language that allows people to tell a computer what they
    want it to do, without having to know very much about how the computer
    does it.

    On May 13, 3:18 am, "Diez B. Roggisch" <> wrote:
    > Dave Parker wrote:
    > > On May 12, 7:20 pm, wrote:
    > >>Yes, I am trying to visualize something.

    >
    > > If it is related to making furniture comfortable for humans, have you
    > > considered painting the furniture with thermochromic paint (
    > >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermochromism)?  It changes color in
    > > response to temperature, which in part is determined by how hard a
    > > body is pressed against it because close contact tends to trap heat.
    > > An evenly distributed color might indicated evenly distributed
    > > pressure.

    >
    > Don't let yourself be irritated by castironpi - he's the virtual equivalent
    > of a mumbling mad man in this group. Ignorance serves best as remedy - and
    > getting a filter to work, as I did (so I only see his postings being
    > quoted... a huge relief!)
    >
    > Diez
     
    Dave Parker, May 13, 2008
    #14
  15. Dave Parker

    Guest

    On May 13, 8:32 am, Dave Parker <> wrote:
    > > Don't let yourself be irritated by castironpi

    >
    > I'm not the sort to get irritated by anyone.  There is value in all
    > interaction.  Flaming Thunder is itself the averaging of interactions
    > with many computer languages and conversations with many people, so as
    > to create a language that allows people to tell a computer what they
    > want it to do, without having to know very much about how the computer
    > does it.
    >
    > On May 13, 3:18 am, "Diez B. Roggisch" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Dave Parker wrote:
    > > > On May 12, 7:20 pm, wrote:
    > > >>Yes, I am trying to visualize something.

    >
    > > > If it is related to making furniture comfortable for humans, have you
    > > > considered painting the furniture with thermochromic paint (
    > > >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermochromism)? It changes color in
    > > > response to temperature, which in part is determined by how hard a
    > > > body is pressed against it because close contact tends to trap heat.
    > > > An evenly distributed color might indicated evenly distributed
    > > > pressure.

    >
    > > Don't let yourself be irritated by castironpi - he's the virtual equivalent
    > > of a mumbling mad man in this group. Ignorance serves best as remedy - and
    > > getting a filter to work, as I did (so I only see his postings being
    > > quoted... a huge relief!)

    >
    > > Diez- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I got hung-up on your sailboat and it took me to coffee. But I return
    empty-handed, and castironpi does not bother me. All I try to do in
    life is write video games. I am not convinced that the colorspace
    occupies three dimensions necessarily. But I do like sailboats and
    furniture.

    I am into city planning, roadways, infrastructure, but don't work -
    too- hard. Furniture can be pretty stock and utility on the micro
    level--- there's just been runs on the banks before to microize to
    certain energy/mass/volume/metabolism levels. People like stuff and
    pull.

    If I can get a word in, I also like to distribute economy, and
    microize currency. So long as currency stays current, nobody minds.
    Do you need something done... or said?
     
    , May 13, 2008
    #15
  16. Dave Parker

    Paul McGuire Guest

    On May 13, 8:32 am, Dave Parker <> wrote:
    > > Don't let yourself be irritated by castironpi

    >
    > I'm not the sort to get irritated by anyone.  There is value in all
    > interaction.


    Not this interaction, I'm afraid. What irritates *me* about
    castironpi is that he uses a chatterbot to clutter up the threads
    here. If you go back to his postings from a year ago (and selected
    ones since), his comments are coherent and sensible. These rambling
    stream-of-consciousness rants about t.v.'s and coffee are (I guess)
    his idea of a joke. But they are certainly not worth your time in
    trying to respond to them.

    -- Paul
     
    Paul McGuire, May 13, 2008
    #16
  17. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Guest

    On May 13, 7:44 am, wrote:
    > I am not convinced that the colorspace occupies three dimensions necessarily.


    Apparently there are some people -- called tetrachromats -- who can
    see color in four dimensions. They have extra sets of cones in their
    retinas containing a different photopigment. So, the dimensions of
    color appear to be an artifact of our visual systems, and not inherent
    in the colors themselves which are linear (one-dimensional) in
    frequency. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrachromacy
     
    Dave Parker, May 13, 2008
    #17
  18. Dave Parker

    Guest

    On May 13, 9:05 am, Dave Parker <> wrote:
    > On May 13, 7:44 am, wrote:
    >
    > > I am not convinced that the colorspace occupies three dimensions necessarily.

    >
    > Apparently there are some people -- called tetrachromats -- who can
    > see color in four dimensions.  They have extra sets of cones in their
    > retinas containing a different photopigment.  So, the dimensions of
    > color appear to be an artifact of our visual systems, and not inherent
    > in the colors themselves which are linear (one-dimensional) in
    > frequency.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrachromacy


    My conspiracy theorists know too much. They would question that
    mathematical claim of science, that retinas only detect one dimension
    of one force. Are we asking if something like that is fundamental to
    life? I have been very sceptical about emperical claims, especially
    since I just try to render stuff and play Tron.
     
    , May 13, 2008
    #18
  19. Dave Parker

    hdante Guest

    On May 13, 10:58 am, Paul McGuire <> wrote:
    > On May 13, 8:32 am, Dave Parker <> wrote:
    >
    > > > Don't let yourself be irritated by castironpi

    >
    > > I'm not the sort to get irritated by anyone.  There is value in all
    > > interaction.

    >
    > Not this interaction, I'm afraid.  What irritates *me* about
    > castironpi is that he uses a chatterbot to clutter up the threads
    > here.  If you go back to his postings from a year ago (and selected
    > ones since), his comments are coherent and sensible.  These rambling
    > stream-of-consciousness rants about t.v.'s and coffee are (I guess)
    > his idea of a joke.  But they are certainly not worth your time in
    > trying to respond to them.
    >
    > -- Paul


    I don't think castironpi so annoying that I should filter its
    messages. It would be enough if he were better tuned. He is much
    smarter than the emacs shrink, for example. :p

    The "Flaming Thunder" looks promising, but without being free
    software, it's unlikely it will create a large developer community,
    specially considering both free general purpose and scientific
    programming languages.
     
    hdante, May 13, 2008
    #19
  20. Dave Parker

    Guest

    On May 13, 9:34 am, hdante <> wrote:
    > On May 13, 10:58 am, Paul McGuire <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On May 13, 8:32 am, Dave Parker <> wrote:

    >
    > > > > Don't let yourself be irritated by castironpi

    >
    > > > I'm not the sort to get irritated by anyone.  There is value in all
    > > > interaction.

    >
    > > Not this interaction, I'm afraid.  What irritates *me* about
    > > castironpi is that he uses a chatterbot to clutter up the threads
    > > here.  If you go back to his postings from a year ago (and selected
    > > ones since), his comments are coherent and sensible.  These rambling
    > > stream-of-consciousness rants about t.v.'s and coffee are (I guess)
    > > his idea of a joke.  But they are certainly not worth your time in
    > > trying to respond to them.

    >
    > > -- Paul

    >
    >  I don't think castironpi so annoying that I should filter its
    > messages. It would be enough if he were better tuned. He is much
    > smarter than the emacs shrink, for example. :p
    >
    >  The "Flaming Thunder" looks promising, but without being free
    > software, it's unlikely it will create a large developer community,
    > specially considering both free general purpose and scientific
    > programming languages.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    What is a tank a tank of? Even if it does, developer communities are
    willing to sustain it. That's a pretty colinear judgement, that I
    find the community sustainable. Does anyone commute to out of
    control? What is to out? No jumping down thrown. Tut tut.
     
    , May 13, 2008
    #20
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