Python book for a non-programmer

Discussion in 'Python' started by Simon Brunning, Nov 25, 2005.

  1. I have a non-programming friend who wants to learn Python. It's been
    so long since I've been in her shoes that I don't feel qualified to
    judge the books aimed at people in her situation. I know of two such
    books:

    <http://www.freenetpages.co.uk/hp/alan.gauld/>
    <http://www.ibiblio.org/obp/thinkCSpy/>

    Any recommendations, or otherwise?

    --
    Cheers,
    Simon B,
    ,
    http://www.brunningonline.net/simon/blog/
     
    Simon Brunning, Nov 25, 2005
    #1
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  2. Simon Brunning

    Guest

    Simon Brunning wrote:
    > I have a non-programming friend who wants to learn Python. It's been
    > so long since I've been in her shoes that I don't feel qualified to
    > judge the books aimed at people in her situation. I know of two such
    > books:


    These are not books but a very good intro to programming in general
    (http://hetland.org/python/instant-hacking.php) and to Python basics
    (http://hetland.org/python/instant-python.php).

    I also liked A Byte of Python which, instead, is a full book:
    http://www.byteofpython.info/

    Lorenzo
     
    , Nov 25, 2005
    #2
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  3. Simon Brunning

    Guest

    , Nov 25, 2005
    #3
  4. Simon Brunning wrote:
    > I have a non-programming friend who wants to learn Python. It's been
    > so long since I've been in her shoes that I don't feel qualified to
    > judge the books aimed at people in her situation. I know of two such
    > books:
    >
    > <http://www.freenetpages.co.uk/hp/alan.gauld/>
    > <http://www.ibiblio.org/obp/thinkCSpy/>
    >
    > Any recommendations, or otherwise?
    >
    > --
    > Cheers,
    > Simon B,
    > ,
    > http://www.brunningonline.net/simon/blog/


    If you want real (dead-tree) books, you will find Chris Fehily's Visual
    Quickstart Guide recommended by others here (though it's ageing -
    2002). I'm about 2/3 through and it's been great for me:

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/asin/0201748843/richarddooling/

    And a brand new one which I just ordered: Beginning Python (Programmer
    To Programmer) which despite the title has a great intro to programming
    before it quickly accelerates:

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/asin/0764596543/richarddooling/

    Cheers,

    bs
     
    BartlebyScrivener, Nov 25, 2005
    #4
  5. Simon Brunning, Nov 25, 2005
    #5
  6. Read my reply here from another thread:
    http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.python/browse_thread/thread/25aada3c22ce6e66/cc69fd0c78384e5b?q=luis+cogliati's&rnum=1#cc69fd0c78384e5b
     
    Luis M. Gonzalez, Nov 25, 2005
    #6
  7. Simon Brunning

    Shane Guest

    Simon Brunning wrote:
    > I wouldn't have thought either of those was suitable for a
    > non-programmer. Great for cross-trainers, yes, but neither is intended
    > as a programming tutorial.


    I agree, I just thought that the other replies had provided more than
    enough resources to cover the basics, so I was just suggesting some
    material that could be used when the basics had been absorbed.

    Sorry about the confusion.
     
    Shane, Nov 25, 2005
    #7
  8. Simon Brunning

    Kent Johnson Guest

    Simon Brunning wrote:
    > I have a non-programming friend who wants to learn Python. It's been
    > so long since I've been in her shoes that I don't feel qualified to
    > judge the books aimed at people in her situation.


    Python Programming for the absolute beginner
    http://premierpressbooks.com/ptr_detail.cfm?group=Programming&isbn=1-59200-073-8

    Python Programming: An Introduction to Computer Science
    http://www.fbeedle.com/99-6.html

    And the Introductory Books page in the wiki lists many:
    http://wiki.python.org/moin/IntroductoryBooks

    Kent
     
    Kent Johnson, Nov 25, 2005
    #8
  9. Simon Brunning

    Steve Guest

    I recommend "The Quick Python Book" by Daryl Harms. What makes it
    different from all other introductory books is that it is actually
    *readable*. You can just sit down and read it like a novel and enjoy
    it.
     
    Steve, Nov 25, 2005
    #9
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